Author Topic: Possible NWMP Uniform and Kit at 2020 … no, 2021 … no, 2022 National Muster  (Read 11496 times)

Offline Baltimore Ed

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RSJ, your thread has indeed spanned years so it must be a good one. Just reread it and thought that I’d mention a development in my NS. A fellow cas club member graciously gave me 25 pieces of C45S [Cowboy special] brass to play with. My initial plan was to use them in my short Trapper 1894 but I just resized 6 and tried them in my RNWMP NS Colt and they fit perfectly. I’ll reload them today and try them but they should work just fine. Need 50 more. Photos soon.
"Give'em hell, Pike"
 There is no horse so dead that you cannot continue to beat it.

Offline RattlesnakeJack

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Ed,

I have never tried the Cowboy Special case, even though all my cas guns are .45 Colt.  Might well have given it a try back at the very outset, when my rifle was a Trapper necessitating the dreaded “load one on the clock” …. But it didn’t exist yet back then!

Mind you, it is my understanding you can use shorter cartridges with the more “modern” lever-action designs which incorporate a “stop” at the action end of the magazine tube to control cartridge feed.  My present three cas rifles (repro ‘66, repro and original ‘73) lack that feature, so overall cartridge length is critical: if they are too short, the round on the lifter lets the next round protrude past the mouth of the magazine tube, stopping the lifter from rising … if too long, the bullet of the round on the lifter can protrude into the magazine tube and also prevent the lifter from rising.  In fact, I have learned that my .45 Colt cartridges, in addition to being within a narrow OAL range, must also have a firm factory crimp so bullets won’t get shifted back in their cases under magazine spring pressure, recoil jostling and such.
Rattlesnake Jack Robson, Scout, Rocky Mountain Rangers, North West Canada, 1885
Major John M. Robson, Royal Scots of Canada, 1883-1901
Sgt. John Robson, Queen's Own Rifles of Canada, 1885
Bvt. Col, Commanding International Dept. and Div.  of Canada, Grand Army of the Frontier

Offline Baltimore Ed

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Guess I was lucky in buying it as my Stoeger 1873 that I used in my 1873 Centennial / Spanish contract carbine can run the shorter .45 Schofield [w/255 gr bullets] fine as the lifter will cam the next loaded round back into the magazine tube as it rises.
"Give'em hell, Pike"
 There is no horse so dead that you cannot continue to beat it.

Offline smoke

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RattlesnakeJack....thanks for the update!  Looking forward to the pics of you in the complete kit.

I need to go back and re-read this thread especially the part where you dyed the jacket.

GAF#379

Offline RattlesnakeJack

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Smoke,

The first images I have posted about dyeing the jacket to a more suitable tone are the most recent ones.  At the time of my last "update" back in May I mentioned that I would be doing these further alterations and possibly dyeing the jacket if I got time before leaving for the Muster … but of course the border didn't open then, so I've had lots of time to finally get this done ...
Rattlesnake Jack Robson, Scout, Rocky Mountain Rangers, North West Canada, 1885
Major John M. Robson, Royal Scots of Canada, 1883-1901
Sgt. John Robson, Queen's Own Rifles of Canada, 1885
Bvt. Col, Commanding International Dept. and Div.  of Canada, Grand Army of the Frontier

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Offline RattlesnakeJack

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Well, time to resurrect this thread with an update …

It is definitely looking like my second amendment to the original title (when I added "… no, 2022") is actually going to come to fruition!  Two fellow Canucks from right here in Medicine Hat, and I, are registered and finalizing our travel plans …

The sole benefit of the hiatus of more than two years since I began this thread has at least afforded me plenty of time to tweak and fine-tune my uniforms and kit …  :-\

Recently, I finally got access to a copy of the premier reference "Uniforms of the Canadian Mounted Police" by Dr. James J. Boulton, which was published over 30 years ago, and is accordingly long out of print and very expensive to acquire if you can locate a copy for sale.  At almost 550 pages, it is the veritable "bible" on the subject, with the chapters covering the GAF time frame (1870s, 1880s, 1890s, and the first decade of the 1900s) occupying 202 pages of that number. (I know, because I have expended a great deal of time and effort to scan every single page covering those four decades, and converted them into PDF files for my ongoing reference!)

As a result of having access to this detailed further information, my fine-tuning continues!  One thing I was unaware of … because it was not specifically mentioned in any of my other references, and I had not actually noticed that detail in any colour uniform depictions I had previously seen … is that NWMP NCO rank insignia (chevrons, crowns, etc) were NOT worked on a red background as I had assumed … in fact, the background was dark blue  … and thus would contrast sharply with the red of the tunic material, rather than blending in.

As an example, here is an image I cropped from a colour photo of the Sergeant's insignia on a genuine NWMP tunic (very poor resolution and detail unfortunately when blown up this much) compared to the appearance of the red background insignia (posted a while back) which I had already sewn on my tunic (and also on my cotton duck fatigue jacket) …
 


I was aware a dark blue background was the case with later RNWMP and RCMP rank insignia, but had always been of the mistaken impression that this blue background was only introduced in 1904 when the Force was granted the "Royal" designation.  That is certainly when the dark blue "facing colour" (i.e. contrasting shoulder straps, collars (or collar gorgets) and sometimes contrasting cuffs, depending on the type of garment), reserved for "Royal" regiments in the British Army, first appeared on Mounted Police uniforms. 

Anyway, this late revelation (coupled with my well-known obsession for correct detail) has introduced a new task for me … I have removed the Sergeant's stripes and crown, with their red backgrounds, from both the dress tunic and fatigue jacket to which I had painstakingly sewn them … and have now applied them to a correct blue background. Now I will trim them out and sew them back onto the two garments …

Rattlesnake Jack Robson, Scout, Rocky Mountain Rangers, North West Canada, 1885
Major John M. Robson, Royal Scots of Canada, 1883-1901
Sgt. John Robson, Queen's Own Rifles of Canada, 1885
Bvt. Col, Commanding International Dept. and Div.  of Canada, Grand Army of the Frontier

 

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