Author Topic: Did Lincoln Ever Even Read the Declaration of Independence? . . .  (Read 1079 times)

Offline redcliffsw

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Did Lincoln Ever Even Read the Declaration of Independence?

Or was he hoping that most Americans had never read it, and that he could bamboozle them into a war “for the union”?  You be the judge:

“It is safe to assume that no government proper ever had a provision in its organic law for its own termination.”
— Abraham Lincoln, first inaugural address

“[T]o secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, — That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or abolish it . . .”
— Declaration of Independence


https://www.lewrockwell.com/lrc-blog/lincoln-ever-even-read-declaration-independence/

Offline Warph

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Re: Did Lincoln Ever Even Read the Declaration of Independence? . . .
« Reply #1 on: December 01, 2015, 09:57:11 PM »
Did Lincoln Ever Even Read the Declaration of Independence?

Or was he hoping that most Americans had never read it, and that he could bamboozle them into a war “for the union”?  You be the judge:

“It is safe to assume that no government proper ever had a provision in its organic law for its own termination.”
— Abraham Lincoln, first inaugural address

“[T]o secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, — That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or abolish it . . .”
— Declaration of Independence
https://www.lewrockwell.com/lrc-blog/lincoln-ever-even-read-declaration-independence/




Thomas DiLorenzo is a fraudulent Author for LewRockwell.com... this is a clown that writes fraudulent misrepresentation of Abe Lincoln from his birth to his death.  This is the clown that wrote about wanting to tear-down the Lincoln Memorial in DC. and many other Lincoln memorials in the USA.  This guy is NUTS!!


Thomas DiLorenzo, Fraud?
November 16, 2012
Brooks D. Simpson
   
 

Thomas DiLorenzo is upset.  No, it’s not because Barack Obama won reelection (although who knows what he may think about that).  It’s because of Abraham Lincoln … or, more specifically, the release of a new movie on Lincoln directed by Stephen Spielberg, which is now in general release.  If anything, DiLorenzo is more bitter than I’ve ever seen him, although his material is getting old.

First, DiLorenzo reminds us of the work of Lerone Bennett, especially Forced Into Glory (2000). Nothing new here. DiLorenzo is incorrect that Bennett’s work was “mostly ignored” by what he calls “the Lincoln cult”; indeed, Bennett and I shared the platform (along with Allen Guelzo) at the Abraham Lincoln Association Symposium in Springfield, Illinois, in 2002. But DiLorenzo has never allowed facts to interfere with his ranting, so why should he change now?  He seems utterly unaware of the passing of David Donald, but he’s not unwilling to misrepresent what Donald had to say about Lincoln’s involvement in the passage by Congress of the Thirteenth Amendment.  “Not since 1862, when he tried hard to persuade border-state congressmen to support his gradual emancipation plan, had the president been so deeply involved in the legislative process,” Donald wrote in his 1995 biography, Lincoln (page 554). Donald simply questioned the claims of some historians who said that Lincoln went so far as to engage in some clever and perhaps even unsavory dealings with several Democrats to secure passage of the amendment.  As DiLorenzo says that Donald was (well, he says “is”) “the preeminent Lincoln scholar of our day,” one wonders why he failed to read what Donald had to say. Is DiLorenzo ignorant, or does he prefer willful distortion?

The remainder of DiLorenzo’s first outburst simply echoes Bennett’s argument. I was hoping for something a little more original.

DiLorenzo’s second rant chides Lincoln for not ending slavery on his own. He’s wonderfully oblivious to the fact that Lincoln understood that he was constrained by the Constitution in his efforts to end slavery, and that only the actions of the Confederates (who showed no interest in cooperating with emancipation) opened up the opportunity to Lincoln to act. Once more he revives Donald, only to distort what Donald said; once more he accepts Bennett at his word as an excuse to avoid doing any research on his own.  My undergraduates know that they have to do better than that, but then DiLorenzo’s trained in economics, not history. DiLorenzo declares that in acting to end slavery Lincoln did “something he refused to do for fifty-four of his fifty-six years”; one wonders why Lincoln as an infant, child, or teenager didn’t act sooner, since DiLorenzo thinks he should have acted from the cradle.

But DiLorenzo’s not finished.
After trashing Doris Kearns Goodwin (one of his favorite targets), DiLorenzo wanders back into saying that if Lincoln had really wanted to end slavery, he would have done so peacefully. Apparently he overlooks the fact that there was a war brought on by people who wanted to preserve and protect slavery and who saw in Lincoln a threat to that very institution  If only they had listened to Thomas DiLorenzo, they would have learned that they had nothing to worry about on that score.

I’m sure that those people who deplore the Lincoln movie or anything else about the sixteenth president will cite DiLorenzo as the ultimate authority on such matters. Maybe some of them are signing on to those secession petitions as we speak (one wonders whether DiLorenzo realizes that this is his moment to shine). For the rest of us, however, one is left to wonder whether DiLorenzo knows what he’s talking about or whether in his desperation to make a point he’s not above distorting the historical record. As I’ve argued before, he’s capable of either act, having committed both in the past.

"Every once in a while I just have a compelling need to shoot my mouth off." 
--Warph

"If you don't have a sense of humor, you probably don't have any sense at all."
-- Warph

"A gun is like a parachute.  If you need one, and don't have one, you'll probably never need one again."

Offline redcliffsw

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Re: Did Lincoln Ever Even Read the Declaration of Independence? . . .
« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2015, 07:21:41 AM »

Warph, it's kinda funny that you would post an article written by the northerner Brooks D. Simpson.  Don't recall ever seeing anything about this yankee dude. 

Brooks D. Simpson defends the yankee view.  Looks like he's from the Republican mold - the same as Obama.  Republicans get along with Obama much more than most people realize and there's a reason for that.



 

Offline Warph

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Re: Did Lincoln Ever Even Read the Declaration of Independence? . . .
« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2015, 03:24:34 AM »
Warph, it's kinda funny that you would post an article written by the northerner Brooks D. Simpson.  Don't recall ever seeing anything about this yankee dude. 

Well, Red, let me introduce him to you:



Brooks D. Simpson - BIO
Brooks D. Simpson is ASU Foundation Professor of History at Arizona State University, where he is a member of the College of Letters and Science faculty as well as Honors Faculty at Barrett, The Honors College. He graduated from the University of Virginia in 1979 with a BA in History and International Relations and earned his MA (1982) and PhD (1989) from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Areas of Expertise

Media Expert,  Spoken Languages, Expertise in: • Biography; Grant, Henry Adams, collective biographical studies
• History: American; American presidency, American national politics, Civil War and Reconstruction
• Politics: American; American presidency, American national politics
• Sports; Professional team sports (MLB, NHL, NFL); Teams, fans, facilities, community identity.
• War and War Crimes; Military history, military policy and strategy, dissent in wartime, presidential war powers





Research Interests
As a historian of the United States, Dr. Simpson studies American political and military history as well as the American presidency, specializing in the era of the Civil War and Reconstruction.


Publications and Other Intellectual Contributions

Simpson, Brooks D.. The Civil War in the East, 1861-1865. Potomac Books (2013).

Edited book: Simpson, Brooks D.. The Civil War: The Third Year Told By Those Who Lived It. Library of America (2013).

C-SPAN. Abraham Lincoln's War Policies in 1863. Abraham Lincoln Association (2013).
C-SPAN. Generalship at Gettysburg. National Park Service/Gettysburg National Military Park (2013).
C-SPAN. The Chattanooga Campaign. Tennessee Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission (2013).

Fox News. Gettysburg Sesquicentennial. Fox News (2013).

History (The History Channel). The Ultimate Guide to the Presidents. History (2013).
History (The History Channel). The Ultimate Guide to the Presidents (1). History (2013).
History (The History Channel). The Ultimate Guide to the Presidents (2). History (2013).
History (The History Channel). The Ultimate Guide to the Presidents (4). History (2013).

Book chapter: Brooks D. Simpson. "Hit Him Again!": The Caning of Charles Sumner. Congress and the Crisis of the 1850s. Ohio University Press (2012).
Book chapter: Brooks D. Simpson. "What Happened on Orchard Knob?". Chattanooga. Southern Illinois University Press (2012).
Book chapter: Brooks D. Simpson. Revisiting Republican Reconstruction Policy. A Political Nation: New

Directions in Mid-Nineteenth Century American Political History. University Press of Virginia (2012).
Loren Farr, interviewer; Brooks Simpson, interviewee.. Interview. Tulsa Studio 21 (2012).

Albert Castel with Brooks D. Simpson. Victors in Blue. University Press of Kansas (2011).

Simpson, Brooks D.. The Civil War in the East, 1861-1865. ABC-CLIO (2011).

Edited book: Brooks D. Simpson, Stephen W. Sears, and Aaron Sheehan-Dean. The Civil War: The First Year Told By Those Who Lived It. Library of America (2011).

Review of: Bluecoats and Tar Heels: Soldiers and Civilians in Reconstruction North Carolina. American Historical Review (2010).

Book chapter: Brooks D. Simpson. Fugitive Slave Law of 1850. Milestone Documents of African American History. Schlager (2010).

Book chapter: Brooks D. Simpson. US v. Cruikshank. Milestone Documents of African American History. Schlager (2010).

Simpson, Brooks D.. Grant, Ulysses S.. The Yale Biographical Dictionary of American Law. Yale University Press (2009).

Simpson, Brooks D.. The Reconstruction Presidents. University Press of Kansas (2009).

Edited book: David W. Blight and Brooks D. Simpson. Union and Emancipation: Essays on Politics and Race in the Civil War Era. Kent State University Press (2009).

Book chapter: Brooks D. Simpson. After Shiloh: Grant, Sherman, and Survival. Shiloh. Southern Illinois University Press (2009).

Book chapter: Simpson, Brooks D.. Daniel Webster. Milestone Documents of American Leaders. Schlager Group (2009).

Book chapter: Simpson, Brooks D.. James Buchanan. Milestone Documents of American Leaders. Schlager Group (2009).

Book chapter: Simpson, Brooks D.. Robert E. Lee. Milestone Documents of American Leaders. Schlager Group (2009).

Book chapter: Simpson, Brooks D.. Robert F. Kennedy. Milestone Documents of American Leaders. Schlager Group (2009).

Book chapter: Simpson, Brooks D.. Ulysses S. Grant. Milestone Documents of American Leaders. Schlager Group (2009).

Brooks D. Simpson. Battles, Leaders, Stories. The Ambrose Bierce Journal (2008).

Book chapter: Brooks D. Simpson. Earvin "Magic" Johnson. African American Icons of Sport. Greenwood (2008).

Book chapter: Brooks D. Simpson with Rebecca A. Simpson. Derek Jeter. African American Icons of Sport. Greenwood (2008).

Review of: Vicksburg: The Campaign That Opened the Mississippi. Journal of Southern History (2006).

Simpson, Brooks D. Bobby Orr. Encyclopedia of New England. Yale University Press (2005).

Simpson, Brooks D. Boston Bruins. Encyclopedia of New England. Yale University Press (2005).

Review of: For Free Press and Equal Rights. Alabama Review (2005).

Review of: Frederickburg! Frwedericksburg!. H-Net (H-Civil War) (2005).

Book chapter: Simpson, Brooks D (Author) . Ex parte Milligan (1866). The Public Debate over Controversial Supreme Court Decisions. Congressional Quarterly (2005).

Book chapter: Simpson, Brooks D (Author) . The Doom of Slavery: Ulysses S. Grant, War Aims, and Emancipation, 1861-1863. Annual Editions/American History: Volume 1. McGraw Hill (2005).

Review of: In the Presence of Mine Enemies. Journal of American History (2004).




Presentations

Simpson, Brooks D. "The Rise of Ulysses. S. Grant". Liberty University Civil War Conference. (Sep 2012).
Simpson, Brooks D. The US Army and the Road to Emancipation. Sacred Trust Presentations @ Gettysburg NMP. (Jul 2012).
Simpson, Brooks D. The Rise of Ulysses S. Grant, 1862. 2012 Civil War Institute at Gettysburg College. (Jun 2012).
Simpson, Brooks D. Civil War Blogging. 2012 Civil War Institute. (Jun 2012).
Simpson, Brooks D. Mark Grimsley's The Hard Hand of War. 2012 Civil War Institute. (Jun 2012).
Simpson, Brooks D., and Grimsley, Mark Antietam Battlefield Tour. 2012 Civil War Institute. (Jun 2012).
Simpson, Brooks D. Lincoln, Grant, Congress, and the Lieutenant General Act. United States Capitol Historical Society. (May 2012).
Simpson, Brooks D. The Civil War and Its Aftermath. United States Capitol Historical Society. (May 2012).
Simpson, Brooks D. Civil War Generalship. Society of Military Historians Annual Meeting. (May 2012).
Simpson, Brooks D. The Road to Emancipation. Tulsa CC Series on the American Civil War. (Apr 2012).
Simpson, Brooks D. Barack Obama: Promise and Reality. Barack Obama and American Democracy Conference, Tufts Univ.. (Mar 2012).
Brooks D. Simpson The Fruits of Victory: Ulysses S. Grant and the Legacy of the Civil War. Great Lakes History Conference. (Oct 2011).
Brooks D. Simpson Origins of the Department of Justice. OAH Convention. (Apr 2011).
Simpson, Brooks D. "Union War Planning in 1861". US Capitol Historical Society. (May 2010).
Simpson, Brooks D. "Nationalism in the Civil War Era". Southern Historical Association Annual Meeting. (Nov 2009).
Simpson, Brooks D. "Lincoln, Congress, and the Management of Military Affairs". US Capitol Historical Society. (May 2009).
Simpson, Brooks D. "Lincoln and His Contemporaries". Lincoln Bicentennial: ALPLM. (Feb 2009).
Simpson, Brooks D. "Lincoln and the Civil War". Lincoln Bicentennial: ALPLM. (Feb 2009).
Simpson, Brooks NEW APPROACHES TO CIVIL WAR MILITARY HISTORY. Southern Historical Association. (Nov 2006).
Simpson, Brooks Abraham Lincoln: Flawed Warlord. The Art of Command in the Civil War Conference. (Oct 2005).
Simpson, Brooks Homefront and Battlefront in the Civil War. Grand Valley State University/Great Lakes History Conference. (Oct 2005).
Simpson, Brooks The Grant/Lincoln Relationship. The Art of Command in the Civil War. (Oct 2005).
Simpson, Brooks Ulysses S. Grant. The Ohio Eight: Ohio in Presidential Politics. (Oct 2004).
Simpson, Brooks Ulysses S. Grant and the 1864 Overland Campaign. Central Virginia Battlefield Trust. (May 2004).
Simpson, Brooks Declaration of Independence Presentation/Naturalization Ceremony.
Simpson, Brooks Home Front and Battle Front. Massachusetts School of Law Civil War Symposium.
Simpson, Brooks The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln.
Simpson, Brooks The Politics of Command. Massachusetts School of Law Civil War Symposium.
Simpson, Brooks The Road to Gettysburg. Blue and Gray Education Society.
Simpson, Brooks PFF and Graduate Training. American Historical Association.
Simpson, Brooks The Education of Historians in the 21st Century. American Historical Association Meeting.
Simpson, Brooks George B. McClellan. History America Tours, United States Military Academy.
Simpson, Brooks Searching for Ulysses. Illinois History Symposium.
Simpson, Brooks Explaining Victory. Southern Historical Association.
Simpson, Brooks Grant at Shiloh. Civil War Institute.
Simpson, Brooks Working to Define the Meaning of Victory: U. S. Grant and the Memory of the Civil War. Southern Historical Association.
Simpson, Brooks Combating Catastrophe: Ulysses S. Grant from Cold Harbor to the Crater. Deep Delta Civil War Symposium.
Simpson, Brooks Grant and the Wilderness Campaign. Mosby heritage Association.
Simpson, Brooks How Did Freedom Come?: A Reappraisal of the Emancipation Debate. Abraham Lincoln Symposium.
Simpson, Brooks The American Sphinx?. Conference on Presidential Rhetoric, Bush Presidential Library.



Books By Brooks D. Simpson



« Last Edit: December 05, 2015, 03:41:54 AM by Warph »
"Every once in a while I just have a compelling need to shoot my mouth off." 
--Warph

"If you don't have a sense of humor, you probably don't have any sense at all."
-- Warph

"A gun is like a parachute.  If you need one, and don't have one, you'll probably never need one again."

Offline redcliffsw

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Re: Did Lincoln Ever Even Read the Declaration of Independence? . . .
« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2015, 05:42:37 AM »

Warph, I don't agree with the guy any more than I agree with Obama.  Why compromise what our founders established with guys like Brooks D. Simpson or Barack Obama? 

But that's where we are today with emphasis on removing the landmarks of the country for political correctness and revision of history.

That's been the thrust of the Republican Party ever since Lincoln and Brooks D. Simpson is right there with 'em.




Offline Warph

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Re: Did Lincoln Ever Even Read the Declaration of Independence? . . .
« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2015, 02:59:50 PM »
Warph, I don't agree with the guy any more than I agree with Obama.  Why compromise what our founders established with guys like Brooks D. Simpson or Barack Obama? 

But that's where we are today with emphasis on removing the landmarks of the country for political correctness and revision of history.

That's been the thrust of the Republican Party ever since Lincoln and Brooks D. Simpson is right there with 'em.


Ay yi yi...
"Every once in a while I just have a compelling need to shoot my mouth off." 
--Warph

"If you don't have a sense of humor, you probably don't have any sense at all."
-- Warph

"A gun is like a parachute.  If you need one, and don't have one, you'll probably never need one again."

Offline Anmar

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Re: Did Lincoln Ever Even Read the Declaration of Independence? . . .
« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2015, 03:49:14 PM »

Ay yi yi...

welcome to modern times, where facts and logical thinking is unimportant and ignored.
"The chief source of problems is solutions"

Offline redcliffsw

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Re: Did Lincoln Ever Even Read the Declaration of Independence? . . .
« Reply #7 on: December 06, 2015, 07:45:31 AM »

Lincoln was America's first war criminal.



 

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