Author Topic: Common Core Education And More About Federal Government Control  (Read 76771 times)

Offline Bullwinkle

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Re: Common Core Education And More About Federal Government Control
« Reply #280 on: March 16, 2015, 10:34:39 AM »
       Or in other words, you haven't the foggiest how to use common core math to solve it.

      Point, game, set and match.

Ross

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Re: Common Core Education And More About Federal Government Control
« Reply #281 on: March 16, 2015, 12:26:13 PM »


   Please don't get me wrong. I'm not a big believer in Common Core math because it is just over the heads of most parents. I don't like to see parents frustrated.  It is Not MY Common Core Math!

The Common Core math is not over anyone’s head you pompous ass.

The math is a completey ludicrous way of teaching. But as a teacher that only follow organizational thinking it is understandable that it is way over your head. It is Beyond your comprehension.

By the way Ross, you say you have complained about the Dumbing Down of America, but NOT the schools? I can't imagine how you can separate the one from the other. Are you saying you DON"T think America's schools have been dumbed down? Can you prove that you don't? 8)


If you paid half attention and half way comprehended anything you would not be asking these questions or making these remarks.

I posted about our infallible West Elk and how well they are doing educating. I posted the state chart that shows that West Elk is average on the scale of all schools in Kansas. I have made remarks and posted information that showed the Educational Standards of American school declining educational standards.
I have stated if the school board paid a little attention to education and less attention to building a Taj Mahal of a building for a declining population and if they paid less attention to wanting to build a professional sports arena and wasting tens of thousands of dollars perhaps the kids would get a better education.

At least you admit there are some good teachers out there.

You just don’t pay attention do you. I have posted that I have schoolteachers and police in my family.
But neither one has to say I approve of wrong doing by other people in their chosen profession.

I stated a cousin of mine was an excellent teacher but that her husband was a terrible teacher. He managed to retire only because it is near impossible to fire a teacher. And the School Administration won’t be bothered by the effort it takes. Besides they might fire some important person’s relative and then lose their job. Yes ethics and honesty is lacking.

It would be nice if you would keep on finding a few positive things to say.

You organizational brain damaged people are told an awful lot to be positive in your thinking. There is only one thing wrong with that. If you do accept the failings you can not improve and be an even better  xchool.
It is only through by accepting the challenges of what is wrong (negative) can you accomplish some thing positive with in the establishment, for the establishment to do its job properly.

You really think your schools aren't any better than average? What yard stick are you using? I've seen winning academic teams in your paper.Aren't they Elk County kids? Or does that effort somehow not count? I see various honor roles listed in the paper.They don't count either? Is every child going to be on the honor roll every time? Nope. Every  good teacher wants to take every child as they receive them and take them as far as the child is able to go during that school year,Common Core or Not.That will vary from child to child and subject to subject.

Dummy the winning academic teams are a perfect point. That proves nothing! That is only a very few of the students.  And besides it can hinge on luck, Perhaps the other teams members had a bad day the day before or maybe not feeling up to par. Maybe a few of the other team showed up sick. It’s just a game anyway you look at it. Any of a number of factors can apply. Psychology even plays a factor in games.
Schools are not graded on games!
I stated the ruler I measured West Elk with , the States grading system and their charts as I stated above.
Do a little research on your own and learn something about education as a whole. Please. One of your teachers here on the for tried to re-design the meaning of the of the chart and failed miserably. I don’t think she is teaching grade school right now. I wonder why, no I don’t.

  What about the kids and schools that are doing fine with Common Core? How are they going to feel about all this? Where does all this flap leave them? There are  teachers who went to summer school to learn how to teach Common Core Math.Should they feel good about their success or feel like fools?

What happened to your statement of teaching fabricated as  “Mathematician Style”?
That was really dumb wasn’t it?

You mean the states and schools that buckled under for Meister Obama. Do you have any documentation they are doing well?  They buckle under for the worst reason of all ----- the threat of money.

Show me some facts that any are doing well?

Do you keep up with even the slightest attention to current events?

It sounds to me that you accept Meister Obama’s control over every facet of our children’s lives.
Him and his uber rich and New World Order because they are an organization.

We are well on our way to a Communist Government because of the wrong kind of thinking, in my opinion.

Why am I wasting my time?
Perhaps because I care?
But it is really getting old fast!


Ross

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Re: Common Core Education And More About Federal Government Control
« Reply #282 on: March 16, 2015, 12:29:51 PM »
       Or in other words, you haven't the foggiest how to use common core math to solve it.

      Point, game, set and match.

She told us  parents can't comprehend Common Core Math didn't she?

I guess she must be a parent? I don;t know?

Ross

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Re: Common Core Education And More About Federal Government Control
« Reply #283 on: March 16, 2015, 09:46:20 PM »
ORWELLIAN NIGHTMARE
UNLEASHED ON
SCHOOLKIDS
Teachers now thought police with extreme new spy 'tools'

Technology is increasingly being used by schools to gather data on students, testing not just their knowledge of
subjects like reading, math and science but subjective “social skills.”

Parents and students have been “opting out” of high-stakes testing in record numbers over the past year, saying the standardized tests waste valuable instruction time, cause undue stress and often measure “skills” that have nothing to do with academic knowledge.

Rather than merely asking for a right or wrong answer to a math, history or science question, the new assessment industry is capable of boring into a child’s attitudes, values, opinions and beliefs, all of which parents and privacy advocates say is no business of the government’s.

The pushback has led some state education systems to recommend a reduction in the amount of high-stakes testing in public schools.

But, parents beware, the sudden realization that maybe too much testing is going on is not going to lead to less data being collected. Quite the opposite.

In fact, traditional testing may no longer be needed. Schools have found they have better, more efficient ways to collect even more data on your child, without resorting to paper and sharpened No. 2 pencils.

Oregon’s Gov. John Kitzhaber, for instance, assigned a task force to this problem recently and after a year of private meetings, the group is ready to unveil its recommendations which are expected to include replacing standardized tests with high-tech “observation” tools.

Fewer tests might sound like a relief to stressed-out students and wary parents.

But what if your child’s teacher could have access to a software application that allows her to collect data on your child in real time, without ever rolling out a test?

Enter the BOSS app. It is just one of countless new data-collection products available to school systems looking to collect data on the sneak.

BOSS stands for Behavioral Observation of Students in Schools. The app was designed to “enable psychologists to observe” patients but is now being marketed to schools interesting in tracking students’ behavioral patterns.

Created by the British-based textbook giant Pearson, the BOSS app can be loaded onto a smartphone and used to secretly monitor every move of targeted students in the classroom.

Does little Johnny fidget in his seat a bit too much? Does he socialize with the students around him in an appropriate manner? Does he tend to stare aimlessly out the window when he should be paying attention to the teacher?

All of this information can be pulled in and stored in an individual dossier for later analyzing and assigned an intervention and remediation that will deal with Johnny’s shortcomings, whether they be laziness, lack of assertiveness, over-aggressiveness or whatever psychological problem the app may discover.

BOSS app can be downloaded from iTunes for $29.99 and comes in age-appropriate versions from pre-K through 12th grade. The product description boasts that BOSS is able to “record students’ behaviors in real time. The BOSS software uses interactive buttons labeled to a particular behavior for the observer to press while observing a student during a given duration. The software keeps track of the amount of times a behavioral button is depressed during an observation.”

The app tracks “a student’s active or passive engagement in activities” and will collect data and email it to the teacher “for future use to help support a disability diagnosis,” the Pearson promotional material states.

The BOSS app is not the only new technology percolating in the education industry that has the ability to invisibly assess students in real time without their knowledge, or the knowledge of their parents.

Below is a small sampling of other apps being marketed to educators:


• “You Can Handle Them All”: This app, produced by Master Teacher, describes 124 behaviors that teachers may encounter in their students and identifies the primary cause of each. A teacher using this app places each student into a category, with options that include “The Blabbermouth,” “The Blurter,” “The Boss,” “The Bully,” “The Complainer,” “The Disengaged” and “The Class Clown.” It then prompts the teacher with suggestions on how to remedy each unwanted behavior.

• “Pearson Dash”: Another product by Pearson, Dash, according to the iTunes product description, enables teachers to “Organize and track your students” according to classroom seating charts, to “record, edit, and e-mail observational notes on your students,” to “View student performance and mastery of skills with SuccessTracker data.”

• “What Would You Do at School If”: This app focuses squarely on social skills. Put out by Super Duper Publications, it seeks to elicit answers to sensitive, revealing questions that help schools develop a psychological profile on each student. Instead of a test, this app is presented to a young child as a fun “game” while collecting data on the child’s parental upbringing and personality.


“Select the cards you want students to see, and have them work on solving problems and practicing good social skills as they discuss situations in and around school,” the product description says. “The prompts include questions like, ‘What would you do if … you forgot your homework?’ and, ‘What would you do if … your classmate teased you about the new shirt you wore?’”

Students are then graded based on how many “right” answers they give in what is clearly a test of one’s attitudes, behaviors, values and beliefs. The problem with such questions, say privacy experts, is that the “right” answer is clearly subjective and has nothing to do with a student’s ability to acquire and retain objective academic knowledge.

For instance, a parent may teach a boy to defend a weaker boy or a girl who is getting beat up by a bully. But what if the “right” answer in the role playing game is to go and tell a teacher or principal? Will the child get marked down if he answers that he would intervene and physically stop the bully’s attack? What will the remediation for this “wrong” behavioral skill be?

According to promotional details on iTunes, the “What Would You Do at School If” app lets teachers:

• Track correct and incorrect responses for an unlimited number of players.

• Receive feedback for incorrect and/or correct responses

• View results in a graph and see which questions a player missed during a session.

• Print, E-mail and share your results.

The same vendor, Super Duper Publications, puts out a separate app called “Super Duper Data Tracker” that allows teachers to “increase the accuracy and efficiency of your data collection” on each individual student.

There are literally dozens of these apps out there being downloaded by teachers, often at the behest of administrators, and many of them come tailored to the Common Core national education standards.

One teacher who reviewed the Super Duper Data Tracker on iTunes said he liked it but wished the data came with increased portability and could be more easily integrated into other platforms.

“It would also be great if this was tied to a website where teachers had an account and could input large amounts of data on something other than the small screen or tempermental (sic) keyboard of an iPad/iPhone,” the teacher said. “Then everything would be backed up, we could share data with other team members (especially in situations where many people see one student!). It is a great app, I just think in the day of icloud and spreadsheets it is BEGGING for a big overhaul.”

Playing video ‘games’

Another hot trend is using role-playing computer games to assess students. The games would be programmed to scoop up data based on every reaction the child has to the challenges presented in the game. The questions could then be changed “on the fly” to probe areas of weakness and collect more data.

One of these games, called the MineCraft Behavioral Improvement Plan, can be programmed to pose a series of ethical dilemmas to which students are asked to respond. It has the ability to adjust the line of questioning depending on the student’s answer to the original set of questions.

“How is it legal or even remotely ethical for untrained teachers to be expected to use devices like these to assess the psychological status of your child?” asks Charlotte Iserbyt, a former aide to President Ronald Reagan’s Education Department and now a blogger on education issues at The ABCs of Dumb Down.

Iserbyt calls the replacement of high-stakes testing with high-tech data-collecting a “bait and switch” tactic that many parents won’t pick up on.

As one YouTube instructional video cited by Iserbyt explains about the personified video games, “We know whenever you click. We know how long you stood waiting to make a jump. We can take in vast amounts of data and if we want, dynamically alter the experience [of the student] based on that data.”

The New York Times recently reported that MineCraft is highly addictive and can quickly become an obsession for many students. Schools around the world are taking advantage. Schools in Stockholm, Sweden, for instance, made the game mandatory for 13-year-old students to learn about sustainable city planning and environmental issues.

While these games might have some value if programmed to build and evaluate students’ knowledge of math equations or science principles, they could be dangerously invasive when used to gauge students’ personalities, ethical responses, political views and emotional makeup.

All of the above apps and games are marketed for use on students in general-instruction classrooms, not just students in special-ed classes with known, serious behavioral problems.

Privacy advocates say technology meant to collect data on a student’s academic knowledge is one thing, but they question whether teachers should be acting like psychologists and collecting data on a student’s “social skills” and personality traits?

Some critics are sounding the alarm that schools will be building a psychological dossier on their students through the use of this technology, and they are starting to ask questions.

Who will have access to this data besides the teacher in the classroom who is collecting it? Where will the data ultimately be stored and for how long?

Who ultimately owns a child’s private data? The school, the school system, the state or the parents? And who has the right to view it?

Will this data be made available to any third-party contractors outside the school, the school district or the state? President Obama took executive action to weaken the FERPA (Family Education Rights and Protection Act) in 2011 giving third-party contractors access to some student data, lending more reason for concern among parents.

And what rules will be set to make sure these new tools are transparent for parents who actually want to know what their children are being taught or tested on?

Iserbyt poses a chilling question:

“If parents can’t even get a hard copy of the current high stakes assessments that their children are taking now, how are they EVER going to get evidence, much less be aware of, the assessments given to their children via computer games or teacher smart phone apps based on a child’s experiential or project-based work, or any of the other invisible assessment model coming down the pike?”

So far, at least, the jury is out on all these questions.


Read more at http://www.wnd.com/2015/03/orwellian-nightmare-unleashed-on-schoolkids/#LCrAIYXbrgxQgeEh.99

Offline Diane Amberg

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Re: Common Core Education And More About Federal Government Control
« Reply #284 on: March 17, 2015, 09:24:32 AM »
When you go back to the name calling, I leave. Gone.

Ross

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Re: Common Core Education And More About Federal Government Control
« Reply #285 on: March 17, 2015, 12:17:16 PM »
When you go back to the name calling, I leave. Gone.

When you call names it's okay!

Actually it's not because of names it's failure to comprehend the subject and communicate intelligently.
Saying things without documentation just doesn't prove anything. Sorry.

To bad you are good for humor with all your diplomas.

That reminds me of this teacher that just made the news with his degree.
It seems a degree doesn't make a person very smart.

Miami elementary school teacher accused of attacking student.
http://www.wsvn.com/story/28521015/miami-elementary-school-teacher-accused-of-attacking-student

Bye-bye

Offline Diane Amberg

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Re: Common Core Education And More About Federal Government Control
« Reply #286 on: March 17, 2015, 12:41:59 PM »
After stewing all over the grocery store, I do have one more thing to say to Bull. He obviously has no clue what math principles are taught in math in any grade in today's schools, Common Core or not. He throws out a supposedly trick question that most adults won't get correct by ANY method they were taught, but expects me , to solve it by Common Core "methods". And which grade's Common Core do you think teaches trick questions?  Please explain the correct answer to me in YOUR version of Common Core math using the appropriate grade's principles.
I never taught math past 5th grade.I didn't teach algebra or geometry ( but I loved it) or physics or calculus. I never had computers to help me like today's kids do.  I did show you my work. What wasn't Common Core about it? Would you know? So, again you resort to insults. Just because I don't answer you doesn't mean I'm wrong.It just means I don't care to continue the conversation. There is no percentage in talking to a bull. They don't listen.... and are good for only one thing.
Ross, you call me a pompous ass for having an opinion? It's the parents who say they don't get it, not me. That's not the way they were taught .True.
(Pushing the sarcasm button.) There is an easy fix. Dumb it down again. Kids get easy A's .The parents are thrilled.The teachers will stop having sleepless nights and all will be well. The heck with the future and what the kids will do with their lives. Who cares? After all, everyone is just out for themselves,right? Just ask anyone in Elk County.HA!
 Done, again. I can't wait to read the School Board election results in the paper. Tee-Hee.

Ross

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Re: Common Core Education And More About Federal Government Control
« Reply #287 on: March 17, 2015, 05:00:26 PM »

Ross, you call me a pompous ass for having an opinion? It's the parents who say they don't get it, not me.

You are a pompous to think you can speak for all parents. The ones I have read about have not said they don't understand it they say it is ludicrous.

T0 be able to add 8+7= ?    Find 10?     Why?                   It's stupid?
Why subtract 2 from 7 and add 2+8 to get 10   and then   add 5+10 =15 makes for a lot of additional unnecessary steps and more procedures for the kids to memorize to come up with a simple 7+ 8=15.

See you would have known this had you read any of this thread.

Did you read the article ORWELLIAN NIGHTMARE UNLEASHED ON SCHOOLKIDS ?

Parents and students have been “opting out” of high-stakes testing in record numbers over the past year, saying the standardized tests waste valuable instruction time, cause undue stress and often measure “skills” that have nothing to do with academic knowledge.

Rather than merely asking for a right or wrong answer to a math, history or science question, the new assessment industry is capable of boring into a child’s attitudes, values, opinions and beliefs, all of which parents and privacy advocates say is no business of the government’s.

The pushback has led some state education systems to recommend a reduction in the amount of high-stakes testing in public schools.

But, parents beware, the sudden realization that maybe too much testing is going on is not going to lead to less data being collected. Quite the opposite.


Just plain gestapo?

Are schools suppose to teach or compile FBI Herbert Hoover style dossiers on kids thoughts?

You use the comment the teachers are using a mathematicians style of math for teaching which was totally fictitious, that makes you a pompous ass to think any one would believe any such fabrication.

I thought you said you were gone, I'm glad you aren't though because this is fun.



 

Give me a break.



Ross

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Re: Common Core Education And More About Federal Government Control
« Reply #288 on: March 17, 2015, 09:55:23 PM »
"One of the world’s largest education publishing companies, which crafted the standardized tests for the new Common Core curriculum, has been monitoring social media accounts to see if students refer to their exams."

They call it monitoring I call it spying.
Corporation Spying on kids
Where does it end?
Will corporations supply discipline in the form of jail time, is that what is next?




Government Control or Corporate Control what's the difference?
Thought Police are Thought Police?

« Last Edit: March 17, 2015, 10:03:34 PM by ROSS »

Offline jarhead

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Re: Common Core Education And More About Federal Government Control
« Reply #289 on: March 18, 2015, 09:01:23 AM »
Quote from Diane:
There is no percentage in talking to a bull. They don't listen.... and are good for only one thing.

 Be very careful Bull. The talking is over and I think some ol cow might need serviced. Hope you are up to the task, my friend. ;D

 

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