Author Topic: The Gun-Flint & Flint-Lock, Learn About a Vanishing Weapon of America’s Frontier  (Read 178 times)

Offline Tsalagidave

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*I made this article to help reach our younger generations who will inherit this hobby.
The Gun-Flint & Flint-Lock, Learn About a Vanishing Weapon of America’s Frontier Past
The ‘pan-and-flint’ arms of the American Revolution and its following decades should be remembered as the signature weapon of the west generations before six-guns and Sharps rifles crossed the plains.

Whiteoak Hills (1844) - along the Illinois River, Indian Territory


It was early spring in the pre-dawn light as George “Kana’ti” Tucker and his nephew “Tsali” made their ways through the groves of oak and walnut in search of wild turkey. Winter was still in the air as Kana’ti adjusted his dark red turban and pulled the lapels of his coat tight. “Ah-geydutsi, why did we not go after that gobbler down in the run?” asked the young nephew.
The man being of many years’ experience in the hunt, paused and replied. “U-westi , that old Tom-gobbler only wanted to talk big but he’d nary come near us so we’ll leave him be.”

Tsali shrugged, “Why don’t we go to him then.”

“Dulegi have greater vision than man. That is their gift. If we approach, he will see us first and flee.”  said the old hunter.


Kana’ti paused to listen, then looked over the new Carolina fowler he had just bought from Johnston’s store in the previous week. It was iron-mounted with a dark red maple stock. Carefully he checked the priming powder in his pan and then set the hammer in place with a firm ‘snap’. He motioned for the boy’s silence and to get low as he now slid gently over the ground up alongside an old hickory log.

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Guns don't kill people; fathers with pretty daughters do.

Offline Dave T

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Excellent write up Dave. I've always thought of the muzzle loaders, both flint and percussion, as the guns of exploration and discovery "beyond the wide Missouri". The black powder cartridge guns that became common place after the War (the one between the states of course) were the guns of settlement and civilization of the Trans-Mississippi West.

Dave

Offline Tsalagidave

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Thanks Dave,

I'm looking forward to learning what you know about BP metallic cartridges.  I'm a rich man to have the kind of friends I can learn so much from.

-Dave
Guns don't kill people; fathers with pretty daughters do.

 

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