Author Topic: Did they reload?  (Read 14859 times)

Offline Black River Smith

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Re: Did they reload?
« Reply #60 on: September 22, 2019, 06:53:06 PM »
Del, Thanks for bringing at up.

Yes, I finally found what I once read and heard.  I have been re-watching the Ken Burns 'The West' on Netflix just this week.  Well the comment about a 25 cent cartridge was made there.  Now if you have the corresponding book it is on page 263.  The comment was made by someone there and who wrote his own book about his buffalo hunting time in 1873, Frank H. Mayer.  The statement was...
"When I went into the business, I sat down and figured... There were 20 million buffalo, each worth at least $3-- $60 million.  At the very outside, cartridges cost 25 cents each, so every time I fired one I got my investment back....".

I was maybe wrong about the quote being related to Matterson.  I did find his comment stating that he practiced a lot to keep up his advantage and image.

Just another point about the crowd that quotes exact pricing from Sear.  Please read all the fine print.  They did not mail ammo to individuals.  They demanded cash payment for freighted items.  The ammo had to freighted to a central location, then had to be gotten to the distant towns.  That added more to the cost per box.  Who could afford to travel such distances just to pick up a box or two of ammo?  The only one who could or would buy like this would have been the Dry Good or General Stores, maybe mines and these bought in quantity.  The stores would, like now, add mark-ups, it business.  So my point is, if you are in an out of the way town or area the prices to the consumer will be increased for all the extra work to get it in remote areas.  Just like today on some goods.

BRS
Black River Smith

Offline Delmonico

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Re: Did they reload?
« Reply #61 on: September 22, 2019, 07:34:08 PM »
People often do not think about the differences back then compared to today.

Was looking at a microfilm of an 1877 Sidney Nebraska newspaper years ago, closest rail head to the Black Hills, offered Guiness and Bass's ale in bottles at a saloon, no price given.  Considering what it would have taken to get it there, would have made 44-77 Sharps rounds at 25 cents look cheap.
Mongrel Historian


Always get the water for the coffee upstream from the herd.

Ab Ovo Usque ad Mala

The time has passed so quick, the years all run together now.

Offline Delmonico

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Re: Did they reload?
« Reply #62 on: September 23, 2019, 01:22:41 AM »
Had a thought as I was laying down to sleep, did a very quick search for fun to compare modern prices. 

9mm ammo often can be bought for around 15-20 cents a round, depending on brand and load.

Took one of the new wiz bang rounds a coworker had and 270 WSM ammo runs around $2 a round not an exact percentage difference as the 45 Colt and Sharps rounds but pretty dang close.

Mongrel Historian


Always get the water for the coffee upstream from the herd.

Ab Ovo Usque ad Mala

The time has passed so quick, the years all run together now.

Offline LonesomePigeon

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Re: Did they reload?
« Reply #63 on: October 21, 2019, 08:50:08 AM »
The original question was about did gunslingers reload. Here is not exactly a gunslinger but a sheep rancher of West Texas who apparently did reload. Lawrence Haley of Eagle Pass in 1875 ordered a Sharps Model 1874 Sporting Rifle .45-70 along with "a set of reloading implements, 300 loaded cartridges, 1000 primers, 1000 lubricating disks, a cap awl and a leather case".

https://www.gunsinternational.com/guns-for-sale-online/rifles/sharps-rifles-antique/rare-historic-texas-1874-sharps.cfm?gun_id=101285397


 

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