Author Topic: Bolo knife scabbard repair  (Read 713 times)

Offline Baltimore Ed

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Bolo knife scabbard repair
« on: July 21, 2018, 10:23:58 pm »
Troopers, what would be the best way to glue my bolo scabbard wood / brass insert back into it’s original Brauer Bros 1918 leather / canvas cover? I don’t want the glue to bleed through the canvas. The wood insert wants to pull out along with my bolo-bowie. Or is there any way to reduce the tension on the spring clips in the liner?
« Last Edit: July 22, 2018, 08:48:49 am by Baltimore Ed »
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Offline Pitspitr

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Re: Bolo knife scabbard repair
« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2018, 07:01:47 am »
Contact cement or something like that so it doesn't need through? For the spring tension fix, it would seem like a file would be called for
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Offline LongWalker

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Re: Bolo knife scabbard repair
« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2018, 08:05:25 am »
Was it glued originally, or did the maker rely on the friction fit between the liner and cover?  I don't know, I've never disassembled a scabbard of that vintage.

If you must glue it (if it was originally glued) use hide glue.  (Actually, for a job like this you probably want fish glue, with vinegar added to the water the glue granules are dissolved in.)  Between the fish glue and the added vinegar, you get a bond that is more resistant to heat and humidity (and occasional rain etc).  If you can't find fish glue granules, go to the grocery store and get Knox brand pure gelatin.  Pain in the tucchus to work with the first few times, but you can cheat to make it a little easier. 

Clean the surfaces to be glued.  Have your glue heated to the namufacturer's recommended temp (use a double boiler setup if you don't have a glue pot).  "Size" the wood and canvas surfaces (apply a very thin coat of thinned glue and let dry). Then assemble the scabbard and apply heat (I usually use an iron, with a folded hand towel in between) to the area to be bonded.  The heat will soften the glue; when it cools it will be glued together. 

Should you ever need to disassemble the scabbard for repairs or restoration, the process can be reversed.  Contact cement etc are permanent (yay!) but often have long-term negative effects.
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Offline St. George

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Re: Bolo knife scabbard repair
« Reply #3 on: July 22, 2018, 09:26:51 am »
The originals are friction-fit.

Put it on and wet it - then put it in the sun and it'll snug up.

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Offline Baltimore Ed

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Re: Bolo knife scabbard repair
« Reply #4 on: July 24, 2018, 09:43:13 pm »
St George, appears that you win the kewpie doll. Soaked the leather and canvas cover and put the liner in, had to wack the insert some to get it all the way. Put it under a desk lamp, flipped it occasionally for a day and sure enough it’s tight. Thanks.
"Give'em hell, Pike"
 There is no horse so dead that you cannot continue to beat it.