Author Topic: Uberti Research Project  (Read 10076 times)

Offline greyhawk

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Re: Uberti Research Project
« Reply #25 on: March 01, 2018, 05:50:08 pm »
Thanks Badlands: your 66 indicates that the first variants in .38 were made in the period 1966/67 (XXIII = 1967).
Long Johns Wolf

This is really interesting - I have a strong memory of staring open mouthed at a beautiful hand engraved Brass frame repro model 66 on one of my many trips with a good mate of mine - we were chasing winchesters at the time (old 92's) and it had to be in this time frame from 1969 to 1972 - not earlier or later. Price was a tad over AU$300 and about half or a bit less for the plain version from memory - dont know that we even looked at the manufacturer (proly have assumed since, that it was a Uberti) and I always thought it was a 44/40 (I think 38 special woulda stuck in my craw some at that point in life) This either took place in the time frame I stated here or ALL of it is my imagination  

I have a 66 carbine in 22RF .....XX7 date mark , It has "Westerner's Arms" stamped in the prominent space on the top of the barrel and the Uberti barrel markings left side of barrel between the forend wood and the back sight , Cal 22LR on the top tang , Serial No, "Made in Italy" and the Uberti logo are on the underside of the action just behind the cartridge elevator opening

Had a 66 in 22magnum similar age I thought, but we sold it, have seen a couple others in 22 .

Have a 66 rifle in 44/40 ..... AA date mark    Uberti markings on the barrel much more prominent , serial number is near the end of the bottom tang  

Price quoted above ??? pre inflation days !!!  When our Aussie dollar floated in 1966 the US$ to AU$ was about the reverse of where it is now - one aussie now buys .76U$ -- back then one U$ bought about .74 AU$ ----- that $150 or so was a big heap of money = four to five weeks gross wages for me at the time
 
« Last Edit: March 02, 2018, 05:10:26 am by greyhawk »

Offline Fox Creek Kid

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Re: Uberti Research Project
« Reply #26 on: March 01, 2018, 11:29:40 pm »
...It has "Westerner's Arms" stamped in the prominent space on the top of the barrel and the Uberti barrel markings left side of barrel...

That would have been Western Arms who were threatened legally by Winchester-Western regarding the name so the owner/importer, Leonard Allen of Santa Fe, NM, changed the name to Allen Arms. He later sold out to Mike Harvey of Cimarron Firearms in the 1980's who was originally located in Houston, TX before moving to Fredericksburg.

I bought an Uberti Henry Rifle  in the Spring of 1982 from Primitive Arms in Ozark, MO, but the rifle was stamped Allen Arms, Santa Fe, NM. I paid $440 sawmill dollars which was dealer cost at the time and a boatload of cash if I may add.

A little history for the old farts here:

http://grrw.org/uberti-santa-fe-hawken/
« Last Edit: March 01, 2018, 11:39:32 pm by Fox Creek Kid »

Offline Cliff Fendley

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Re: Uberti Research Project
« Reply #27 on: March 02, 2018, 12:36:04 am »
Cool info there FCK
http://www.fendleyknives.com/

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Offline Major 2

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Re: Uberti Research Project
« Reply #28 on: March 02, 2018, 01:25:45 am »
I had a 66 Saddle ring carbine in 38 Special marker  XXX  for 1974 
I don't recall the purchase price...it was Navy Arms

and a Henry  in 44/40  [AE]  1979 Navy Arms  and it was  $385 ( March of 1980)  which including shipping to Florida and 10% to the receiving FFL.
At the time, I ordered it , listed as carbine (22" barrel) and was all NA had in stock.
I mentioned it in this thread earlier.

when planets align...do the deal !

Offline Mike

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Re: Uberti Research Project
« Reply #29 on: March 02, 2018, 02:17:57 am »
May have seen one a few years ago, would like one my self.
Buffalochip

Offline greyhawk

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Re: Uberti Research Project
« Reply #30 on: March 02, 2018, 04:19:44 am »
That would have been Western Arms who were threatened legally by Winchester-Western regarding the name so the owner/importer, Leonard Allen of Santa Fe, NM, changed the name to Allen Arms. He later sold out to Mike Harvey of Cimarron Firearms in the 1980's who was originally located in Houston, TX before moving to Fredericksburg.

I bought an Uberti Henry Rifle  in the Spring of 1982 from Primitive Arms in Ozark, MO, but the rifle was stamped Allen Arms, Santa Fe, NM. I paid $440 sawmill dollars which was dealer cost at the time and a boatload of cash if I may add.

A little history for the old farts here:

http://grrw.org/uberti-santa-fe-hawken/

Sounds right but it is most definitely written (stamped) as  "Westerner's Arms" ---100% on that I just checked it again

Offline wildman1

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Re: Uberti Research Project
« Reply #31 on: March 02, 2018, 06:02:14 am »
I have one of those Santa Fe Hawkens. I discovered thru trial and error that it took a .520 rb.
wM1
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Offline Fox Creek Kid

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Re: Uberti Research Project
« Reply #32 on: March 02, 2018, 11:29:41 pm »
I have one of those Santa Fe Hawkens. I discovered thru trial and error that it took a .520 rb.
wM1

I had a Jedediah Smith 1 of 1,000 model that was a nail driver with 0.520" balls and a 0.020" tight patch. I had to pay a legal bill in the early 2000's and unfortunately had to sell it.  :'(

Offline wildman1

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Re: Uberti Research Project
« Reply #33 on: March 03, 2018, 09:05:58 am »
 :'(
wM1
WARTHOG, Dirty Rat #600, BOLD #1056, CGCS,GCSAA, NMLRA, NRA, AF&AM, CBBRC.  If all that cowboy has ever seen is a stockdam, he ain't gonna believe ya when ya tell him about whales.

Offline AZAK44

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Re: Uberti Research Project
« Reply #34 on: March 03, 2018, 03:31:51 pm »
I am trying to get some information on a Uberti dragoon black powder revolver.  Back ground information. In 1862 the Confederate State of Texas contracted with Tucker, Sherrard & Co of Lancaster, TX to produce 3,000 .44 cal. revolvers to be of first model Colt Dragoon pattern.  Only about 400 of these revolvers were produced. Western Arms Corp was to produce a limited series of 400 (T 1 to T 400) of specially serial numbered reproductions.  This gun was part of the Heirloom Collector's Series and was named The Texas Dragoon of 1862.

I have a cased set, although the mould is missing.  Also, my revolver is a second model dragoon.  I do not know if all 400 were produced.

I have not been able to find anything about this firearm on the internet.  What I know is from the paper work that came with the gun.

If anyone has an idea of fair market value, I you appreciate that information. 


Offline Major 2

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Re: Uberti Research Project
« Reply #35 on: March 03, 2018, 04:05:57 pm »
The Tucker, Sherrard & Co. Texas Dragoon was made by both Uberti and Armi San Marco.

Uberti made being slightly rarer , cased (unfired) it is almost worth  what anyone might pay....

I'd think north of $650



The example below is a fired ASM with no case or box .... purchased for $300
« Last Edit: March 03, 2018, 04:09:33 pm by Major 2 »
when planets align...do the deal !

Offline AZAK44

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Re: Uberti Research Project
« Reply #36 on: March 04, 2018, 11:11:16 pm »
To Major 2  Thank you for the information.  It was most helpful.

I hope this gets to you.  I joined just hours before you replied and I am still learning to navigate through this system.