Author Topic: John Hall Arms (photos fixed)  (Read 3137 times)

Offline Cowtown Scout

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John Hall Arms (photos fixed)
« on: September 26, 2015, 10:54:50 am »
I just posted this over on the SASS Wire as a follow up to a question earlier this week on a photo that Sedalia posted of a rifle he saw in a movie.  Thought yall would enjoy the info and photos also.
Scout


Well it's the weekend and I'm back as promised with more info on the Hall and many photos.  Hope you enjoy.  

Sedalia your first photo is actually the model 1819 rifle that has been converted to percussion.  It has a distinctive metal extension down by the trigger and has a solid hammer.  You can see in my photos that the 1836 carbine does not have that extension and has a hole in the hammer.

Because of all the photos I've got to split this up into multiple posts, will try and see if I can do it in 2.

 
Hall History
09/26/2015

John Hancock Hall received a patent for his breach loading design in 1811.  Government testing was delayed by War of 1812 and lack of funds afterwards.  In 1817 US Army requested 100 rifles for testing and evaluation.  Government officially adopted the rifle in 1819 and ordered 1,000 rifles.  The production was to be done on the grounds of the National Armory at Harpers Ferry but it took Hall almost 5 years to produce the tools and machinery to make the rifles as they required parts interchangeability.  Hall was the first in the US to make arms with the precision of interchangeable parts.  The first rifles were assembled in 1824 and all 1,000 were completed that year.  The government ordered an additional 1,000 rifles and it took just over 1 year to fill that second order. In 1826 the government conducted a test were 100 rifles were disassembled and the parts mixed together and then reassembled into 100 newly manufactured stocks.  There were no problems and the successful test resulted in another order of 3,000 rifles in 1828.  Production of the Hall model 1819 continued at Harpers Ferry until 1840 totally about 20,000 rifles.





•   Hall – Harpers Ferry model 1819 rifle, dated 1831, .52 caliber, Flintlock
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•   Hall – Harpers Ferry model 1819 rifle, dated 1832, .52 caliber, Percussion Conversion









 






« Last Edit: November 18, 2017, 10:22:19 am by Cowtown Scout »
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Offline Cowtown Scout

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Re: John Hall Arms
« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2015, 10:57:46 am »
When demand increased for these rifles as state militias started requesting them the Army contracted with Simon North in 1828 who produced 5,700 Hall/North rifles between 1830 and 1836.  The Hall rifle first saw action in the Blackhawk War in Illinois and Wisconsin and then again in 1836 during the Seminole War in Florida.  Congress authorized raising the first regiment of Dragoons in 1833 and North developed a carbine based on the Hall rifle design for use by these mounted infantry units.  From 1834 to 1836 the Hall/North model 1833 carbine was produced by North.  Hall at Harpers Ferry produced the model 1836 carbine from 1836 through 1839.  The carbines were larger caliber smooth bore instead of the smaller caliber rifles.   Several improved versions of the Hall and Hall/North carbines were produced in 1840, 1842 and 1843 including side lever opener.  Hall at Harpers Ferry produced a model 1841 rifle with a “Fish Tail” opener, John Hall died that same year.  His design process and tools for making interchangeable parts for arms predates Eli Whitney’s process.

This is a link to a video from Forgotten Weapons on YouTube about the model 1836 carbine:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rlb0-Wk8xlg

•   Hall – Harpers Ferry model 1836 carbine, dated 1839, .64 caliber smoothbore, percussion
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•   Hall – Harpers Ferry model 1841 rifle, dated 1841, .52 caliber, percussion




















« Last Edit: November 18, 2017, 10:23:49 am by Cowtown Scout »
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Offline Trailrider

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Re: John Hall Arms
« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2015, 11:24:48 am »
 :o You mean Eli Whitney didn't invent interchangeable parts? You mean to say that demonstration Whitney did for Government officials was a put-up job, with the "interchangeable" parts guns hand-fitted to make it look like they were interchangeable?  Say it ain't so, Joe! Sounds to me like Eli was into some "gin" besides for cotton!  ::)  The fact that it took Hall over a year to design the tooling is something phenomenal, considering what tooling for modern machinery can take today! Interesting thing was the fact that at least some of the Hall firearms could have their breechblocks removed and used for a pocket pistol, in a pinch!
Ride to the sound of the guns, but watch out for bushwhackers! Godspeed to all in harm's way in the defense of Freedom! God Bless America!

Your obedient servant,
Trailrider,
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Offline Charles Isaac

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Re: John Hall Arms
« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2015, 01:43:34 pm »



  Hall Rifles! Those are nice-look still good enough to shoot!






 Hall firearms could have their breechblocks removed and used for a pocket pistol, in a pinch!





  ^
This!  :D

Offline Blair

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Re: John Hall Arms
« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2015, 03:20:03 pm »
The 1819 Hall and Hall/North Rifles and Carbines have a unique place in not only US History but the history of the world as being the first fully interchangeable Military firearm to be mass produced.
By 1840, the US Ord. Dept. was working hard to make all US Military manufactured firearms, and those private Companies who contracted for those model arms as 100% interchangeable as the two National Armories.
This effort results in the M-1841 Rifle (aka, the Mississippi Rifle) and the M-1842 Musket.
My best,
 Blair
A Time for Prayer.
"In times of war and not before,
God and the soldier we adore.
But in times of peace and all things right,
God is forgotten and the soldier slighted"
by Rudyard Kipling.
Blair Taylor
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Offline Cowtown Scout

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Re: John Hall Arms (just a bump)
« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2017, 02:29:06 pm »
This is just a bump for those that may have not seen this before.
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Offline Cowtown Scout

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Re: John Hall Arms (photos fixed)
« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2017, 10:24:43 am »
Fixed the photos so they show again.
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