Author Topic: Carrying More Than One Gun  (Read 47354 times)

Offline yahoody

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Re: Carrying More Than One Gun
« Reply #100 on: July 15, 2014, 01:13:39 am »
Quote
The original thread was about 'cowboys' and not professional gun men - there's a big difference.


More than one man living at the time was both off and on in a life time.
Also amazing how modern movies get intertwined here as fact.  Trying to cover a lot of ground between 1860 and 1920.  Things changed a lot over that time period of 60 short years in our country.   Men often as not were soldier, cowboy, good man, desperate man, homesteader, farmer and finally gentleman city dweller all in one life time.  I knew of a couple that worked both sides of the law in the late 1880s.  One cared one or two guns every day until the day he died.  I never saw the other (once a US Deputy Marshal in IT) with a gun.   

Then there is the nonsense like Doc Holiday and Ringo carried nickeled 4 3/4" guns.   Short guns were for rich men with easy access to dry goods and hardware stores.  Long barrel guns were way more common early on and cheap later.  Men bought a long gun (lever gun) generally prior to a hand gun. 

What Farmer Tom said fer a quick reload and
"So, now that we're past a pistol being a primary fighting tool"

Better put previous.."never say never and never say always".
« Last Edit: July 15, 2014, 03:52:19 am by yahoody »
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Offline Cliff Fendley

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Re: Carrying More Than One Gun
« Reply #101 on: July 15, 2014, 08:32:50 am »
Regarding revolvers, the rare photographs I've seen of "real cowboys" actually out on the trail don't show them wearing guns at all, most were just young men not much more than kids and most didn't even own the horses they were riding.

I think for any documentation of someone carrying more than one revolver you need to look to lawmen, outlaws, or gamblers. JB Hickock was known to at least own more than one, how many he actually carried I can't say. I understand some the Missouri outlaw gang members carried as much firepower as they could manage to obtain and carry during some of their robberies.

I doubt if a young man working as a cowboy would have kept two, even if he happened to somehow obtain a second he would have likely sold or traded it seeing as other essentials (and non essentials which may have seemed essential to a young boy) may have been important to him.
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Offline yahoody

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Re: Carrying More Than One Gun
« Reply #102 on: July 15, 2014, 11:09:22 am »
"In The True Story of Kill or be Killed in the Real Old West the Frank "Pistol Pete" Eaton talks about carrying two pistols. I don't really know much about this book, however, it supposedly the recollections of Frank Eaton. Info: http://www.oldwestlawmansforgottenmemoir.com/

It is set in the Indian Territory 1870s."

Pistol Pete certainly was an exception to much of western history.  But not that much of an aberration in IT during the time frames he writes of though IMO/families' experience.

Quote
Farmer Tom
"So not to bump up an old thread... But that site says he killed his first man at 16, with two 45 rounds. Which is fine.
But...
Then it says he started marshalling at 17, in 1872. I didn't think the 45 colt round was available until 73, with the release of the SAA.
And I'm pretty sure Frank Eaton was born in 1860. So like you said...
"Supposedly"

Might want to look at the dates and details again.

By his own accounts Eaton started with cap and ball guns.  A Colt Navy, which seems reasonable enough and talks of them in greta detail.  Then a pair of Navys when he proved he could use both hands.  This as a 8 year old, 1868.  He was given first one SAA in 1875 and then a second shortly after the first.  He killed two men with them by the age of 16..in 1876.  It was in 1877 that he became a US Deputy Marshal by his account.  Time frames and use were consistent with the SAA introduction from what I read.  Also found the way he acquired his 2 guns believable.  Having read another unpublished first hand account of the time and place seems like a very believable story to me.  A few gun errors on dates and models but the SAA wasn't one of them that I noticed.

Man might be offended if you questioned his honesty BITD by a simple error in arithmetic ;-)

I suspect a look at Carlie Russell's work can add more to the conversation than the previous 5 pages.  But good as it is, only a quick look at what he saw and the people he knew.  World was a mighty big place in the 1800s when you traveled by horse and a lot changed between 1860 and 1910.
 
« Last Edit: July 15, 2014, 01:43:16 pm by yahoody »
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Offline Mean Bob Mean

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Re: Carrying More Than One Gun
« Reply #103 on: July 15, 2014, 01:59:55 pm »
Regarding revolvers, the rare photographs I've seen of "real cowboys" actually out on the trail don't show them wearing guns at all, most were just young men not much more than kids and most didn't even own the horses they were riding.

I doubt if a young man working as a cowboy would have kept two, even if he happened to somehow obtain a second he would have likely sold or traded it seeing as other essentials (and non essentials which may have seemed essential to a young boy) may have been important to him.

Yeah, I think this is quite likely the truth.  Everything I have heard or read is that they traded all the time, guns, horses, tack, etc., so the idea of having a stash of guns--again outside outlaws, card sharps and con men, rich men, and lawmen--is out there.  The fabled Earp "posse" reportedly rented many of their weapons and horses before setting out.  
« Last Edit: July 15, 2014, 02:05:28 pm by Mean Bob Mean »
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Offline Mean Bob Mean

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Re: Carrying More Than One Gun
« Reply #104 on: July 15, 2014, 02:04:47 pm »
Ya I agree with the above, wearing two matched guns were not common place however some did and some had a second gun that other folks didn't know about like a derringer or a pocket revolver and some folks had a gun in every pocket It just depended on the individuals lifestyle.
but to make an absolute statement that no one ever carried 2 guns is absolute ignorance

Nicely said, could not agree more.  

I have heard of many a real cowboy who carried a pocket .32 or later .38.  We assume they all loaded up with massive hand cannons.  A slight fellow, used to carrying a pistol as a last resort option or dispatching sick animals, might well have carried a pocket piece alone.  I do think men who made their living card sharping were likely to be well armed and good with guns of high quality.  That's just part of the trade and there were many, many con artists and card sharps in the west.  
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Offline yahoody

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Re: Carrying More Than One Gun
« Reply #105 on: July 15, 2014, 03:42:17 pm »
Pays to remember there were  192,000 1st gen Colt's SAA made up to 1900.  12,500 went to the Army.  28,000 were built in the last 4 years of the Century.

Up till 1945 the most common tools in the western American households was a shovel and some sort of long gun.

Handguns were and still are expensive by comparison to a long gun.  Like hats, boots, saddle and chaps every part of the country had a particular "style" for the place and time.

1886 Winchesters in the Johnson County wars as an example.

Cattle drives were a major economic activity in the American west between 1866 and 1886.  Only 120,000 Colt's SAA made by late 1886, and only 108,000 or so easily available to the population.

12,000 armed troopers and how many cowboys?
« Last Edit: July 15, 2014, 08:20:01 pm by yahoody »
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Offline TwoWalks Baldridge

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Re: Carrying More Than One Gun
« Reply #106 on: July 15, 2014, 06:21:22 pm »
Seems to me that this thread has a definition problem:  The original question was about carrying more than one gun.  Along the road, there has been a lot of discussion about 2 or 3 revolvers.  Was the intent of the original question in regards to carrying multiple guns or multiple revolvers?

The focus also seemed to narrow itself down to the Cowboy.  Now are folks talking about the cow boy that signed on to drive cattle to the rail head and then make their way to were ever, or are they talking about Cowboys (ranch hands) with full time employment?

My Great Grandfather was a lawman from the 1880's to the early 1900's.  According to family lore he always carried a Colt and a small caliber backup gun in his coat pocket.  He would also carry a rifle or a shotgun depending on the need at the time.  My Grandfather had a pretty fair collection of his guns when I was a young boy that I understand went to an uncle and who knows were from there.

I find threads like this thought provoking as well as educational.  They are also a great insight into how different folks can view the same thing to arrive at different conclusions.  In other words, I enjoy them.

There has been one thing stated over and over as fact that does bother me, because of my own life experience and memory.

The American Cowboy was poor and could not afford more than one gun, if he could even afford that. 

In the 1880's a cowboy was paid about $30.00 a month plus his food and lodging if he worked on a ranch. Converted to today's money that would be $630 after food and rent.

In 1963 I left home and joined the military and was paid $73.00 per month plus my food and lodging.  Converted to today's money that would be $521.00

I bought a car, I bought more than a couple of guns, did a whole lot of gambling and drinking as well as chasing the ladies.  Because of this I never have been able to wrap my head around the idea that this young feller could not afford to buy a couple of used guns if he wanted.  I do believe he would put more stock in buying one revolver and a good rifle, but that is just based on what I would have done.

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Offline yahoody

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Re: Carrying More Than One Gun
« Reply #107 on: September 21, 2014, 01:03:27 am »
This thread came to mind today looking up some other info.  Dalton boys and 1m may be 2 pards all took a new pair of 6 guns and a Winchesters  to Coffeyville.  Grat (iirc) came to town the night previous for a drink wearing his new pair of 6 guns and caused quite a stir.  Two guns were unusual.  Two engraved guns with pearl handles even more so.

When the shooting was done the guns were gathered up...8 accounted for of the 10 Bob ordered.  So definitive answer where or who had the last pair for sure.  But some speculation by researchers a pair was traded for fresh horse flesh to be used on the get away and some old oral history to back that up.  If the story is to be believed.

Almost as interesting, is that most if not all the six guns were unfired when the shooting was over.   Town folk and gang members as well did their shooting with rifles.

But there are 4 gunman here that are historically very well documented as using dbl guns.  Have to think the Daltons didn't invent the idea, as they were intentionally trying to best the James/Younger gang tactics.
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Offline Sir Charles deMouton-Black

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Re: Carrying More Than One Gun
« Reply #108 on: September 21, 2014, 10:44:55 am »
See my post at the bottom of page 2.       Nuff said.
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Offline yahoody

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Re: Carrying More Than One Gun
« Reply #109 on: September 21, 2014, 06:08:02 pm »
Quote from: Sir Charles

Three kinds of folks were are known to carry own more than one gun  ;D
1. Law enforcement
2. Hardened criminals
3. CRAZY drunken anal-apertures
Others only when there was need, opportunity, availability and spare cash!

Got it!
« Last Edit: September 21, 2014, 06:09:35 pm by yahoody »
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Offline Peachey Carnehan

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Re: Carrying More Than One Gun
« Reply #110 on: October 30, 2014, 09:47:42 pm »
I know this is an old thread, so forgive me if I'm resurrecting.

My great great granddad owned a ranch near Big Spring, TX from 1882-onwards. In the history written by his son, I have this:

'Ole always carried two sidearms to protect his cattle from rustlers.'

Now whether this is influenced by dime novels, I cannot say. Ole at that time would have been 62, and his son Andrew was 22- so he may have been embellishing, but he was definitely old enough then to not have a 5 year old's colored glasses so to speak. However, this timeline is a good 10 years after the 1872 Texas law prohibiting open carry of firearms. He does not fit the term 'cowboy' in that he owned the ranch and he was in his sixties, but he was a ranch owner, and in Texas. His son ran the ranch from 1884-1895. I thought it interesting family history at any rate.

Offline Trailrider

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Re: Carrying More Than One Gun
« Reply #111 on: October 30, 2014, 10:44:53 pm »
I have no idea how authentic it was, but twenty-thirty years ago, at a collectors' show I saw a M1886 Winchester in .38-56 WCF that purportedly was used by one of the Daltons at Coffeeville. Another interesting thing is how everyone shooting in CAS uses shortbarrel "coach" shotguns.  But, if you look at photos of express car and shotgun messengers on stage coaches, most of the guns had long barrels.  OTOH, I have seen a fairly-well authenticated M1886 with a 16-3/8" barrel and a half-magazine, cal. .40-65WCF, which was probably used in a railroad express car. The Wells Fargo Museum called it a local purchase item bought by one of their field offices. Hard to tell if it was cut down or originally in the short barrel, as the actual measurement matches the standard length for a nominally 16" barrel. One thing I've learned in history is never say, "never", and never say, "always". Look hard enough and you can find just about anything.
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Online treebeard

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Re: Carrying More Than One Gun
« Reply #112 on: October 31, 2014, 10:44:42 am »
Years ago my old Life Guard Captain had befriended a very old cowboy who came to a point in his journey where he could
See that he was soon be crossing that great divide we all must cross. The old cowboy appreciated the friendship the young
Man had shown him and gifted him his working guns which were a 1892 Winchester with 24 inch barrel and a Colt SAA
With 7&1/2 inch barrel--both in 32-20. Both were used but well maintained. The Captain was mature enough to value the
Guns more for the meaning behind the gift than for their monetary value.







Offline Doug.38PR

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Re: Carrying More Than One Gun
« Reply #113 on: December 04, 2014, 01:39:21 pm »
. However, this timeline is a good 10 years after the 1872 Texas law prohibiting open carry of firearms. He does not fit the term 'cowboy' in that he owned the ranch and he was in his sixties, but he was a ranch owner, and in Texas. His son ran the ranch from 1884-1895. I thought it interesting family history at any rate.

Very interesting.

Not to get too off topic, but this 1872 law smells of Reconstruction gov't.  Efforts to disarm the Texans as they opposed reconstruction policies, results thereof and protecting themselves from the lawlessness via vigilantism.   Reconstruction officially ended in 1877 and Texas took it's state government back in 1874 ending the Edmund Davis radical republican regime when Governor Coke took office.   So I kind of doubt this law stayed in effect or, if it did (open carry is currently illegal in Texas), that it was applied to true blue--er gray Texans  ;)  and instead was occasionally used to keep what they considered lawless and dangerous people and outsiders disarmed (right or wrong).    

Also consider, Texas ranches tend to be very large in the central, western and southern parts of the state.  Open carry on your own property (at least as the law is today) is legal I believe.
« Last Edit: December 04, 2014, 01:45:14 pm by Doug.38PR »

Offline Snakeeater

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Re: Carrying More Than One Gun
« Reply #114 on: January 04, 2020, 09:54:26 pm »
Colonel Jack Coffee Hays and his Second Regiment of Texas Rangers arrived at Veracruz on October  17, 1847, just two days later the first consignment of 394 of the 1,000 Colt Walker "six-shooter" revolvers as had been ordered were delivered at Veracruz and issued to the Rangers. Another 180 revolvers were then issued to Captain Walker's Company  (Company C), and more than a month passed before a second consignment of 500 revolvers arrived and were issued. Initial planning called for the issue of two pistols to each soldier, along with a single powder flask, bullet mould, and a combination tool for disassembly and cleaning.  These were typically stored in pommel holsters mounted either side of the saddle pommel for ease of access and weather protection. 

Many of the Walker Colt revolvers were lost in service, and in one single battle in which Truitt's company lost some ten revolvers, in the battle of Sequalteplan (now Zacualtipan) situated about 75 miles northeast of Mexico City in the mountains (in the State of Hidalgo) was a battle that lasted barely ten minutes! A few years ago, a Walker Colt revolver that had been carried by a Private Sam Wilson of Company D was sold at auction for US$920,000. Of the 976 revolvers issued to the five companies of Hays' Texas Rangers, at wars end we know of only 409 that were returned to the government, nearly 300 of which were returned for repairs due to a ruptured cylinder.  Of the 220 issued to Company A, only 39 are known to survive, together with 27 of the 204 issued to Company B, 37 of the 219 issued to Company C, 26 of the 218 issued to Company D, and 18 of the 115 issued to Truitt's (afterwards Captain Ephraim Daggett's) Company E from Shelby County. Of some 1091 sold in private sales to civilians only 16 are known to survive.
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Offline Oregon Bill

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Re: Carrying More Than One Gun
« Reply #115 on: January 05, 2020, 09:53:43 am »
Snakeeater, that's great information. Can you tell me where you are finding it? I have a good reason to ask. Here is my great-great grandfather's enlistment card:

record-image_3QSQ-G9MF-LJJG by ComeWatson, on Flickr

As you can see by his grave stone in Junction, Texas, he fibbed about his age.

jimwaylandtxgrave by ComeWatson, on Flickr

Offline Snakeeater

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Re: Carrying More Than One Gun
« Reply #116 on: January 06, 2020, 12:25:36 pm »
Of course, Hays' Second Texas Regiment of Mounted Volunteers (Texas Rangers) had been federalized, so you are correct that we know for a fact just who was issued these revolvers we also know who lost them and how many were lost, as well as how many exploded in use. In Company E alone, we know the following named individuals lost one or more of their revolvers: Pvt. James Chandler (A.M. Truitt's Co, Second Texas), lost one six-shooter at battle of Sequalteplan, Feb 25, 1848; Pvt. Cleveland Coffee (C. Ashton's Co E, Second Texas), lost one six-shooter, cost $30; Pvt. Asa Dial (A.M. Truitt's Co, Second Texas), lost one six-shooter; Pvt. William Fields (A.M. Truitt's Co, Second Texas), lost one six-shooter at Sequalteplan; Pvt. James Hall (Co E, Second Texas), lost one six-shooter; Pvt. William Hammock (A.M. Truitt's Co, Second Texas), lost one six-shooter at Sequalteplan;  Pvt. Prince B. Hawes (Ashton's Co E, Second Texas), lost one six-shooter (died at Mexico City, Dec 15, 1847); Pvt. Dennis Hays (C. Ashton's Co E, Second Texas), lost one six-shooter, cost $30; Pvt. Oliver Lathrop (A.M. Truitt's Co, Second Texas), lost one six-shooter and 1 rifle (died at Mexico City, Apr 8, 1848); Pvt. Hezekiah McKelvy (A.M. Truitt?s Co, Second Texas), lost three pistols with holsters and housings; Pvt. R. W. McMullen (Handley's Co, Second Texas), lost one six-shooter; Pvt. Nathan B. Phillips (A.M. Truitt's Co, Second Texas), lost two six-shooters at Sequalteplan; Pvt. John Powers (Co E, Second Texas), lost one six-shooter; Pvt; John Roberts (Co E, Second Texas), lost one six-shooter; Pvt. Felix Scott (Handley's Co, Second Texas), lost one six-shooter; 3rd Corporal Jacob Sessum (A.M. Truitt's Co, Second Texas), lost two six-shooters; Pvt. William H. Smith (C. Ashton's Co E, Second Texas), lost one six-shooter, $30; Pvt. Irvin Stanfield (A.M. Truitt's Co, Second Texas), lost one six-shooter, $30; 1 Lt Amos Strickland (A.M. Truitt's Co, Second Texas), two six-shooters unavoidably exploded (resigned Nov 30, 1847 at Jalapa, Mexico); Pvt. Andrew Stumpf (C. Ashton's Co E, Second Texas), lost one six-shooter; 1st Corporal James Thomas (Truitt's Co, Second Texas), lost two six-shooters, $30 each and accoutrements (died Dec 8, 1847 at Puebla, Mexico); Major Alfred M. Truitt (A.M. Truitt's Co, Second Texas), lost two six-shooters in skirmish with guerillas, March 1847 (elected Major of the Regiment, Oct 26, 1847); Pvt. Andrew Jackson Truitt (A.M. Truitt's Co, Second Texas), lost one six-shooter at Sequalteplan; 2nd Lt Thomas F. Tucker (Truitt's Co, Second Texas), lost two six-shooters at Sequalteplan. Andrew Jackson Truitt (1819-1874) was younger brother of Major Alfred Marion Truitt (1817-1864), the regimental Quartermaster of Hays' Second Regiment, and Major Truitt was subsequently elected as Quartermaster of the 28th Texas Cavalry, C.S.A. and afterwards served as Quartermaster General for the State of Texas, 1864. The brothers Truitt and Lt.  Strickland were my great-great-grandfather's nephews. The rest of Hays' command remained in Texas, and occupied the various Ranger forts on the frontier.

Below is taken from a letter written some four months after Captain Middleton Tate Johnson established his Texas Ranger Company at the fort at Marrow Bone Springs, and evidently returned to Shelby County to make preparations for moving his family to what would become Johnson?s Station in Tarrant County, and wished to buy some of John M. Bradley's cattle to take back with him, evidently intended to stock the Ranger station, for which the Fourth Congress had set aside some 320 acres of land around each Ranger station for the express use of cultivation and grazing of cattle in support of the garrison, so sixty head of cattle was not necessarily an exorbitant quantity for Johnson and his family to drive back to Tarrant County. But Bradley was likely one of the nearest ranchers the Johnson knew and had contacted about buying cattle.

While for some modern historians it would be rather hard to explain Johnson, a former Regulator leader, trying to do business with Bradley, a former Moderator leader, less than four years after the end of the conflict known as the Regulator-Moderator War, especially since Bradley's death was reported as a reason for continuing hostilities, yet, once it is understood that this was not the Captain John M. Bradley who was slain by Moorman, Captain Johnson must have explicitly trusted this John M. Bradley (former sheriff of Shelby County, 1838-41) well enough to have sent his young 12-year-old son to hand-deliver a letter 60 miles away in southern Panola County, and wait there for Bradley's reply?

Shelbyville, 17 May 1848
Mr John Bradley
Dr Sir, I Send my Son Thomas up to let you know that I have been unexpectedly detained here, by the Sicknefs of brother Berryman and that I am still willing to buy you cattle according to the offer I made you. And will take any number that you can get ready not exceeding 60 in all, but I want all the old large Steers that can be found. And I have not be particulars a bout the number of cows & calves, So that I can get a few that is gentle and good for milk. If you Still wish to let me have the cattle, go to gathering as Soon as possible and let my little boy know what you determine to do.
Respectfuly yours,
M.T. Johnson

 
In verifying that the letter was indeed by Middleton Tate Johnson, a comparison of the signature, "M.T. Johnson" to another specimen from a receipt when Johnson served in the Ninth Congress, dated January 1845, leaves little doubt as to the authenticity of this letter. But clearly, of any man living at that time, we can rest assured that Middleton Tate Johnson, a former Regulator, would have known whether Captain John M. Bradley was slain in 1844, and Captain Johnson almost certainly would not have written such a letter to a ghost, much less sent his young son on this task.

Bradley's step-sons Wade Hampton Choate (1826-1849) and his brother Stokeley B. Choate (1832-1848) had each served in Colonel John Coffee Hays' 1st Regiment of Texas Mounted Volunteers (USV), with Stokeley serving in Captain Isaac Ferguson?s Company (Co. I), mustered in June 1847, latterly commanded by Lt. Ephraim M. Daggett, while Wade serving in Captain Gabriel M. Armstrong?s Company (Co. G), and was subsequently mustered out near Veracruz, Mexico, on May 1, 1848. Both Wade and Stokely lost horses at sea in transport from Brazos Santiago to Veracruz, and Wade also had a commutation for clothing. Included in his estate papers is a receipt, dated at New Orleans, on 18 May when Wade spent some $40 on clothes. It was Major Alford Marion Truitt (1817-1864), who served as Hays' adjutant, and was who bought the two government horse claims out of the "Guardian Sale" held on 10 January 1852. Truitt's brother, Andrew J. Truitt (1819-1874) married 1849 to Elizabeth Johnson (1833-1928), a daughter of Allen H. Johnson (1795-1845), of Shelby County, an elder brother to former Texas Congressman Alvey R. Johnson (1803-1862). A.R. Johnson was the 'de bonis non' (second) administrator on the estates of the deceased Christopher "Kit" Choate (1776-1834), his widow, Elizabeth (McFadden) Choate Bradley (1792-1847), her second husband John M. Bradley (1794-1849) formerly of Georgia, and her son, Wade H. Choate (1826-1849) who had been the first administrator; all of Shelby County, Texas.

Another of Truitt's brothers, Captain Levi Marion Truitt (1827-1905) was son-in-law to Elijah Morris (1791-1865) , who was the father-in-law to Dr. Robert Burns (1813-1855) of Logansport, Louisiana, the man who killed Charles Watt Moorman (1816-1850). Burns' step-son, Dr. Jacob Smith (1833-1882) married in 1851 to Ellenor L. Johnson (1834-1874), eldest daughter of A.R. Johnson, and a sister to Benjamin Milam Johnson (1838-1915), my great-grandfather.  I have only been working with these family papers for 30 years.

« Last Edit: January 06, 2020, 12:52:49 pm by Snakeeater »
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Offline Oregon Bill

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Re: Carrying More Than One Gun
« Reply #117 on: January 06, 2020, 03:44:18 pm »
Snakeeater, I see now that you have "more than one dog in this fight." Fascinating stuff to research.
It would appear that my GGGF, while Capt. Samuel Highsmith's Company, would have seen considerable action against the Waco Indians among other tasks of frontier defense, according the TSHA handbook:

https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fhi11

Offline Books OToole

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Re: Carrying More Than One Gun
« Reply #118 on: January 19, 2020, 10:26:36 am »
Some folks have a problem with CAS Shooters using more than one gun. The argument being that a Cowboy couldn't afford more than one gun. Well, not everyone was a Cowboy and some Cowboys did better than others.
I invite you to post documentation showing that some folks did carry more than one gun. Here's an example I ran across the other night:

"According to the custom of the time in that country, every man was armed with a good rifle, and a pair of Colt's revolvers. Although cap and ball, these were powerful arms...." - From 'Indian Fight At Battle Flat' by Jack McPhee, Frontier Times May1967
This fight took place in 1864 in Arizona.

This topic has gone all over the place.  I thought I would go to the original post to set the stage for my response:

I just finished A Tenderfoot in Tombstone, by George Whitwell Parsons.  It's hard to nail down just what his profession was; but I'll call him a mining speculator.  He worked as a miner, visited many mines and investigated their potential.  While roaming the territory around Tombstone Arizona in the early 1880s it was best to be armed.  On page 184 he writes; "Saturday, October 8, 1881...Ought to have had a rifle, but had two revolvers, one in a holster and one in a pocket..."

Although this book is a rather tedious read, there are some real material culture nuggets in it.  He actually inventories his arms.  Where most journals may mention "my rifle," Parsons lists his by make,  model, caliber and even serial number.  He owned 2 rifles, (both Winchesters), and 4 pistols (a Colt and 3 Smith & Wessons).

Books
G.I.L.S.

K.V.C.
N.C.O.W.S. 2279 - Senator
Hiram's Rangers C-3
G.A.F. 415
S.F.T.A.

Offline Oregon Bill

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Re: Carrying More Than One Gun
« Reply #119 on: January 19, 2020, 10:58:38 am »
Books, are we guessing the Colt was an SAA or one of the percussion belt guns, and the Smiths fulfilled the "pocket pistol" function?  did he further describe the Smiths?

Offline Books OToole

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Re: Carrying More Than One Gun
« Reply #120 on: January 19, 2020, 08:30:58 pm »
Books, are we guessing the Colt was an SAA or one of the percussion belt guns, and the Smiths fulfilled the "pocket pistol" function?  did he further describe the Smiths?

The Colt was a SSA in .44-40, matching his 1873 Winchester.  The S&Ws were a DA .44, a DA .38 and a No. 1 (.22).
The other Winchester was a 1876 carbine in .45-60.

Besides the detailed inventory; what I found interesting was the fact that he actually wrote of carrying 2 pistols.  And on another occasion, 2 pistols and a rifle.  A photo shows him with the Colt in a holster, the (.38) S&W in the belt, the 1876, two cartridge belts and a knife.

Books
G.I.L.S.

K.V.C.
N.C.O.W.S. 2279 - Senator
Hiram's Rangers C-3
G.A.F. 415
S.F.T.A.

Offline Books OToole

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  • Michael Tatham
Re: Carrying More Than One Gun
« Reply #121 on: January 19, 2020, 08:51:53 pm »
Here is the Fly's Studio photo of G.W. Parsons.

Books
G.I.L.S.

K.V.C.
N.C.O.W.S. 2279 - Senator
Hiram's Rangers C-3
G.A.F. 415
S.F.T.A.

Offline Oregon Bill

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Re: Carrying More Than One Gun
« Reply #122 on: January 20, 2020, 04:07:09 pm »
Fabulous portrait. Thanks for sharing, Books.

 

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