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1
The Barracks / Re: NSW Martini Cadet in .32-20.
« Last post by pony express on Today at 12:19:06 am »
Comparing the dimensions you showed to the ones I posted for .310 Cadet and to .32-20 dimensions, it looks like the only real difference is the length of the chamber, and location of the shoulder. But the BORE is still dimensioned for a .323 bullet. I think if you try to load a .323 bullet in the cases you have, it won't chamber. What I would try with it is this: try using .32-20 dies to re-size and expand case necks, then load with a heel based bullet. You probably won't be able to use the .32-20 SEATING die, because the bullet will be too big to enter. Maybe they will "thumb seat" or if too tight, use something like a 9mm seater die to seat the bullet. Here's some articles I found online, and a bullet available from Buffalo Arms:
https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/britishmilitariaforums/ultimate-310-cadet-and-32-20-cadet-reloading-topic-t8125.html

Here's a couple of recent threads from Rapid Rob at Surplus Rifle Forum:
http://www.surplusrifleforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=16&t=3266
http://www.surplusrifleforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=16&t=3507

Buffalo Arms has a cast bullet:
https://www.buffaloarms.com/323-120-grain-cast-lead-heeled-bullet-20-1-alloy-for-310-cadet-unlubed-box-of-50-323120
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The Barracks / Re: NSW Martini Cadet in .32-20.
« Last post by pony express on Yesterday at 11:21:10 pm »
Here's the measurements for a .310 cadet:

Type
Rifle
Place of origin
United Kingdom
Production history
Designer
W.W. Greener
Designed
1900
Manufacturer
Westley Richards and others
Specifications
Case type
Rimmed, Straight
Bullet diameter
.316 to .320 groove
Neck diameter
.323 in (8.2 mm)
Shoulder diameter
.342 in (8.7 mm)
Base diameter
.354 in (9.0 mm)
Rim diameter
.405 in (10.3 mm)
Rim thickness
.038 in (0.97 mm)
Case length
1.075 in (27.3 mm)
Overall length
1.492 in (37.9 mm)
Rifling twist
20"
Primer type
Small rifle
Ballistic performance
3
The Leather Shop / Re: Got a new toy
« Last post by Capt Quirk on Yesterday at 10:36:46 pm »
Wow! Congrats on the new additions  ;D
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Cosie's Corner & Feed Bag / How to make bread like Grandma
« Last post by Delmonico on Yesterday at 10:08:02 pm »
Most the time Grandma's bread was plain white bread.





How to make bread like Grandma


How many times have you heard someone say that they just can?t make bread like their grandma, many times even mentioning they have the recipe grandma wrote down for them? Most times if the person is any kind of a cook, the bread they make is fine; it just doesn?t have quite the taste of Grandma?s.


When ever anyone mentions this, something I discovered many years ago comes to mind, my brother loves homemade bread, but he had told me one time that it was good, very good, but just didn?t taste like Grandma?s bread did and he was right. He wanted to know if I had Grandma?s recipe, but she never used one that I ever saw, not for just plain old white bread, she just mixed it up, they way I do it, a couple tablespoons of lard, maybe a teaspoon or so of sugar, a dash of salt and work in enough flour for a stiff dough.

Well as I started traveling around with my cook camp, I noticed that my bread tastes different at different places, not a lot, but it was different, none of which was exactly like Grandma?s. I realized the places I went to had well water, and depending on where it was, it tasted different. I also remember a class I had on water treatment years before and I remembered something from the class, a lot of national brands of many items uses water treatment to make them taste the same wherever they are made.

I also remembered Grandma?s bread was never quite the same after she moved to town. What I did the next time we were hunting at the farm was to use the water out of the well. The well has very old pipes and a slight nitrate level, not serious, but we just haul our drinking water from Lincoln and refill at the neighbors who has a much better well. At supper time, my brother went over to the dutch oven full of bread, got himself a couple large pieces, covered it with butter and took a bite. The look on his face was priceless, ?you did find Grandma?s recipe!?

I had to tell him again, there was no written down recipe I?d ever seen. ?You had better remember what you did different, this is Grandma?s bread.? I explained what I had done and now when I?m at the farm I use the water from the well.




5
The Leather Shop / Re: How do you do cartridge loops?
« Last post by Capt Quirk on Yesterday at 09:49:34 pm »
If you decide to stitch the loops, here's our thread on cartridge loops.
Thanks Marshal, that thread was great!
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The Leather Shop / Re: How do you do cartridge loops?
« Last post by greyhawk on Yesterday at 09:25:00 pm »
As dangerous as I would be with a sewing machine, I have learned the overstitch wheel is not my friend either. I rely on stitching chisels and awl. I agree with a liner, and most of my belts are double layered with 6-8oz veg tan.

yup
everybody will work a little different - I mark em and punch with an awl - never seen a stitching chisel  (for thread sewing).?
the overstitch wheel needs to be an exactemo fit to the stitching but if so it will lay the stitches down nice in a lightly gouged channel wont wear from rubbing then. 

We do mm rather than oz weight - I would prefer 3mm for a belt body - dunno how that computes ? maybe 8oz+ ??
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The Leather Shop / Got a new toy
« Last post by Wallace Foster on Yesterday at 08:59:38 pm »
I was with the wife at the sewing machine store getting her a new embroidery machine and saw this and we ended up picking up his and her machines yesterday  ;D

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The Leather Shop / Re: How do you do cartridge loops?
« Last post by Capt Quirk on Yesterday at 08:57:02 pm »
As dangerous as I would be with a sewing machine, I have learned the overstitch wheel is not my friend either. I rely on stitching chisels and awl. I agree with a liner, and most of my belts are double layered with 6-8oz veg tan.



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The Leather Shop / Re: How do you do cartridge loops?
« Last post by greyhawk on Yesterday at 08:12:13 pm »
Authenticity really isn't an issue, it's going on a buscadaro belt for a 22. Sewing is easy enough, even by hand. My thoughts against sewing, is that stitch holes weaken leather, and on a small strip that is pulled on, a likely place to fail. Weaving it seems stronger, but I'm having trouble keeping tension. Sometimes is good, sometimes... not so good.

I reckon stitched is best for holding the ammo BUT any stitched belt ya need to sew a lining on the inside over the stitches otherwise they wear through the stitching and the whole thing is stuffed. All my ammo belts are hand sewed loops with a full hand sewed lining of soft leather (pigskin or garment/upholstery leather) - Its some work but taint that hard in the overall scheme of things. Use a stitch marker and overstitch wheel on all this - hand rolled waxed linen thread.   
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The Winchester Model 1876 / Re: 1876 Winchester parts gun carbine build.
« Last post by greyhawk on Yesterday at 08:04:08 pm »
The pic of Grats rifle was a 38-56, I guess I looked at another pic and then replied to Yahoody's post about the 44-40 being the next step down from a 38-56. Too many pics.
 :D
wM1
PS I checked the other one that did look like a 40-82.

Thats the pic they labeled Bob Daltons gun

The other pic a couple posts above it - thats the Dalton Gun from the museum - I loked at that some more (tying to identify the brass in the pic as 38/56) dang it I reckon that is 45 colt ammo (or maybe 44/40 that was my first guess) - at first I thought they was longer ammo with noses in holes in the gun case but nope - looks like someone just put whatever was handy in with that rifle for effect.   
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