Author Topic: Cherokee Light Horse beginnings  (Read 4912 times)

Offline TwoWalks Baldridge

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Cherokee Light Horse beginnings
« on: August 10, 2011, 06:31:27 PM »
In the fall of 2010 a friend drove me to a local gun range so that I could get some information.  There was a Cowboy action shooting group there that morning, so we stayed to watch.  On the way home my friend began asking about what it would take to do something like that.  He also mentioned he had never shot a gun in his life but really wanted to learn.  I told him that I had a black powder revolver and that I would be happy to teach him to shoot.  We started going to a spot in the forest where he could learn to shoot and so began this journey.  There also began my journey reading about Cowboy action shooting.

It was only a matter of a couple months and another person we knew bought a revolver and joined us.  By July our little group of revolver shooters had grown in number to 4.  Mean while I had learned about SASS, CAS, NCOWS and the Grand Army of the Frontier.  Many conversations later, we each realized that we had an interest in the Cherokee history of the 1840’s to the 1870’s and started calling our little group the “Cherokee Lighthorse”.  This was done as a basis of perhaps some day being able to afford the needed equipment to shoot with a group like NCOWS.  I believe we knew that we would never be able to purchase the needed guns to compete.

We then started looking at the Grand Army of the Frontier and realized that we could belong there.  We could at least compete in their postal matches with revolver only.  This fit what we needed as most of us probably would never be able to travel to a muster any way. 

A few more people that we know have started thinking they might like to try shooting a percussion revolver as well.  We belong to a group that throws tomahawk, shoots primitive archery and have an interest in Cherokee history.  So this got me to looking at some other options.  Looking at what we already do, the history of the Cherokee and the Cherokee light horse as well as groups like the First Cherokee Mounted Rifles.  I realized that many of the Cherokees still used their bows and wore traditional clothing.  Many opted for clothing of a more civilized nature and carried percussion revolvers and rifles.  Then I had another idea form.

The Cherokee light horse needed two groups and the Idea of Company B and Company C formed.

Cherokee Light Horse Company B, is made up of people that shoot primitive archery, throw knives and tomahawks as well as study the heritage for re-enactment. They will also have the opportunity to shoot percussion arms and if they choose can purchase and then transfer to Company C.

Cherokee Light Horse Company C.  As well as the above shoot percussion revolvers and rifles.

In this way we have been able to bring together a larger group of like minded people that share an interest in the period of 1840 to 1865. 

This past weekend our ranks grew.
Cherokee Light Horse Company C, original 4 members
Cherokee Light Horse Company B went from 0 members to 5 members.
There are an additional 2 that are joining but wanted to take a few days to decide if they wanted to join company B or might be able to purchase a couple percussion revolvers and join Company C.

The Cherokee Light Horse now has a membership of 11. 

Now upon my return home after the weekend, I am greeted with the grand news that the American Plainsmen Society has officially began.

Like the American Plainsmen Society, we are in the beginning time, an exciting time and we will change and grow with the organization.

TwoWalks Baldridge




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Offline Sacramento Johnson

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Re: Cherokee Light Horse beginnings
« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2011, 10:49:26 PM »
Howdy!
 Glad to see you found a group of like-minded enthusiasts!  Might I ask where your group is?  Are you of Cherokee heritage?

 I've developed an interest in Texas in the 1850's to early 1860s and the Comanche battles.  I went to a SASS match in Texas a few months ago and  shot Frontiersman; I was trying for an early 1860s Texican look with my botas, Vaquero styled spurs and broad brimmed hat, while shooting some '58s, a Henry, and a double barreled hammered shotgun.


Offline TwoWalks Baldridge

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Re: Cherokee Light Horse beginnings
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2011, 07:41:11 AM »
Howdy!
 Glad to see you found a group of like-minded enthusiasts!  Might I ask where your group is?  Are you of Cherokee heritage?

 I've developed an interest in Texas in the 1850's to early 1860s and the Comanche battles.  I went to a SASS match in Texas a few months ago and  shot Frontiersman; I was trying for an early 1860s Texican look with my botas, Vaquero styled spurs and broad brimmed hat, while shooting some '58s, a Henry, and a double barreled hammered shotgun.

Howdy Sacramento

Our humble little group is scattered over the central California valley.  A couple of us live in the Sonora, Ca area.  My wife and myself do have Cherokee as do a lot of the folks currently in the group.  Over the years this group came together meeting at for Pow Wow and started doing things together because of a love of Archery.

The name of our new group might make it sound like the persona has to be Cherokee but any persona of the 1840 - 1865 era is acceptable.  At the moment I would say the look is more "grab Bag"  ;D

There will probably be a couple of us that next year will also shoot Sass, but for the most part, we prefer shooting scored targets for accuracy.  This is also a great introduction venue for people that have never shot before.

Sounds like you have a good handle on your chosen persona.  The Texas clubs really have their act together and it sounds like you had a really good time.

Speaking of Botas.  Did you make yours?  If so did you use Chuck Burrows pattern?
When guns are banned, fear the man with a hammer

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Re: Cherokee Light Horse beginnings
« Reply #3 on: Today at 09:54:45 PM »

Offline Caleb Hobbs

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Re: Cherokee Light Horse beginnings
« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2011, 01:13:04 PM »
Hey, Sacramento:

If you have time, I'd like to hear more about the Texas Rangers during this period, and especially how you plan to interpret it. I've got a couple of books on the Rangers, but I haven't really studied the organization. Got any photos?

Caleb

Offline Sacramento Johnson

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Re: Cherokee Light Horse beginnings
« Reply #4 on: August 14, 2011, 07:22:35 PM »
Howdy!
 Just got back from a shoot in San Luis Obispo; Chorro Valley Regulator's annual (formerly called the John Wayne Shoot).  Shot Frontiersman and was told by a leather maker there that my botas are a California style.  I didn't realize there were regional differences.  I used a set from Hansen's Leather as a pattern when I made mine, not Chuck Burrow's pattern.

As for Texas Ranger photos of the 1850's; I looked around online and didn't find any.  Captain Baylor's web site gave a nice history on them; seems that time frame was 'come as you are' as concerns clothing and gear. Whatever you could supply on your own was what you used.

I'm actually in Nevada, and am thinking it might be better to switch characters to an Anglo in central or southern California who wears some Californio style gear, seeing as that is what most of my gear is turning out to be.  (I think I can even get a local seamstress to do some pants that button up the sides; got some silver conchos that would mach those on my botas.)   

I was recently reading "Reminiscences of a Ranger; Early Times in Southern California" by Horace Bell.  He wrote about Los Angeles in the early 1850s; more anecdotal than anything, but then I haven't found very many first hand accounts of that era/ place.  Don't laugh too hard, but I picked up some of the old Time-life series books; "The Texans, The Spanish West, The 49ers, The Mexican War" and have just started thumbing through them hoping to learn more about Texas and California in the 1840s-1850's. 

Offline boilerplatejackson

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Re: Cherokee Light Horse beginnings
« Reply #5 on: September 22, 2011, 01:03:23 PM »
Sounds like you have a good foundation for your Cherokee Light Horse CSA. My great grandfather was half Tsalagee/Jalagee/
Cherokee which ever one wishes to call us, whom was drafted into the 3rd Battalion North Carolina Jounior Reserves 1865.
I am more of a Pin and would have stood with John Ross than the Watie faction. Both have very interesting histories during
the 1840-1869 era.

Offline TwoWalks Baldridge

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Re: Cherokee Light Horse beginnings
« Reply #6 on: September 22, 2011, 01:47:35 PM »
Sounds like you have a good foundation for your Cherokee Light Horse CSA. My great grandfather was half Tsalagee/Jalagee/
Cherokee which ever one wishes to call us, whom was drafted into the 3rd Battalion North Carolina Jounior Reserves 1865.
I am more of a Pin and would have stood with John Ross than the Watie faction. Both have very interesting histories during
the 1840-1869 era.

It does seem to be a good foundation.  Currently the total only get together a couple times per year, but four of us have been gathering monthly.

Hard for me to actually view the decisions I would have made in 1832.  I know how I feel about my property rights today as they are taken away, so I could easily imagine myself aligning with Stand Wattie.  His command was the 1st Cherokee mounted rifles.  Not wanting our small group that includes ancestors of Ross and Wattie, to take sides, we decided on the "Cherokee Light Horse" the Indian police of the Cherokee nation.
When guns are banned, fear the man with a hammer

Offline boilerplatejackson

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Re: Cherokee Light Horse beginnings
« Reply #7 on: September 22, 2011, 08:35:47 PM »
Sounds like a good compromise. To those of us who stuck it out to the end, and won our case in the US Supreme Court, the fall
and winter of 1838-39 was nothing short of genocide.

 

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