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91
Tall Tales / Re: It's November, so stuff it.
« Last post by Delmonico on November 24, 2021, 05:33:13 PM »
Good results, going to the next step.
92
The Leather Shop / Re: Barbours linen thread source
« Last post by greyhawk on November 24, 2021, 05:18:40 PM »
I been struggling with nylon and polyester thread in a couple of singer machines I refurbished
Any tips on that would be appreciated
93
The American Plainsmen Society / Re: Hawken Rifles
« Last post by greyhawk on November 24, 2021, 05:14:39 PM »
Interesting thread
On a trip in 2012 I spent some time drooling in the Museum of the Fur Trade in Chadron Nebraska - rows of original mountain man guns with their specs and ancestry .
Its a common enough misconception among a lot of BP shooters that the hawken (whatever that really is) was the weapon of choice for the mountain trappers .

If you took and put any of the modern day replica hawkens I ever saw up among those big ole guns - you woulda heard this whisper "git outa here kid - take that rabbit gun   back home and let us adults deal with the bears and such"

My impression from that trip - its a flintlock - big heavy duty military style lock - barrel is at least 36 - 38 inch but not the 42inch plus of the eastern rifles - half or full stock - 58 to 62 calibre in the main (saw a couple 54's ) - gotta weigh at least ten pound from the look of them 

I'm not a historian but what I saw made sense to me. 
94
The Longbranch / Re: Somebody had deep POCKETS !
« Last post by DarkLord on November 24, 2021, 04:36:42 PM »
Why do I feel like that piece of art is calling out to my gallery guns.

95
The Longbranch / Re: Somebody had deep POCKETS !
« Last post by Major 2 on November 24, 2021, 03:31:41 PM »
Fun Fact!

Polychrome
The word is simply used for multi-colored art, or things decorated or having several colors. The term was first used to describe the decoration of wood and stone carving in full color and gold. Much Egyptian, Greek was originally polychrome with sculptures painted in strong colors.

That piece is a great man cave wall hanger, at $32,500 that would be SOME man cave.

I have some old Shooting Galley silhouette steel targets I found, nothing so Pricey as that though!

There is an underscore collector interest in old galleries.


96
The Longbranch / Re: Somebody had deep POCKETS !
« Last post by Abilene on November 24, 2021, 03:16:32 PM »
Lots of things become one man's treasure 50 to 100 years after they were one man's trash.
97
The Longbranch / Re: Somebody had deep POCKETS !
« Last post by Kent Shootwell on November 24, 2021, 03:09:44 PM »
I’ve seen a lot worst called “art” that went for a lot more. So if you pay a lot then it’s fine art!  ::)
98
The American Plainsmen Society / Re: Hawken Rifles
« Last post by Baltimore Ed on November 24, 2021, 03:05:41 PM »
Enjoyable thread. My first ever shooting experiences were with ml cap guns, a .45 Kentucky that I built from parts, second was a quasi Hawken, .58 cal 1 1/8 inch across the flats, also from parts. After a few years it was rebuilt into an underhammer. I shot monthly with a group called the Swamp Fox Muzzleloaders in Maysville, NC. Had a Remington 1858 repro and Ruger Old Army. Fun shooting. Killed a number of whitetails too during the short BP season, initially it was only 3 days but eventually became a week. Twice killed a pair from the same stand, once on a late morning and another time in the evening. Only killed one 8 pointer.
99
The American Plainsmen Society / Re: Hawken Rifles
« Last post by Gabriel Law on November 24, 2021, 01:29:46 PM »
I am enjoying this thread on Hawken rifles.  I've had an on-again, off-again love affair with creating this particular rifle for about 50 years, and have purchased every piece of literature I could find on it, including Bob Woodfill's new book -= a good investment.
Like a lot of you, I started out too with a T/C "Hawken" rifle, mine a flint .50 cal, and I shot, hunted and enjoyed the rifle for many years.  But as my experience and knowledge grew, I became disatisfied with the "cookie-cutter" factory rifle and wanted a more authentic rifle.  So I began making muzzleloading rifles in a time when the Hawken was all the rage, and everyone, it seemed, wanted one.   I built about a dozen for friends and in the late 70's was hired by a local gunsmith to create Hawken rifles in his shop.  Over the next three years, we turned out around 180 Hawken rifles until finally, interest in it diminished to the point where I was laid off and the Hawken manufacture ceased.  Since then, I have from time to time had requests for Hawken rifles and so have built a number.  I even was able to keep one for myself, and it is my go to rifle for easy shooting accuracy, especially at longer ranges.  Mine is a .62 cal and weighs over 11 pounds.  It is quite true that during the first and second quarters of the 19th century, there were many gunsmiths cranking out plains rifles from the city of St. Louis, and the Hawken bros were just two of them.  Even so, there was something special about the Hawken rifle that endeared it to the hearts of men of adventure, comparative wealth, and prestige, many of their names already appearing in posts above.  And so the love affair continues to this day.
I'm going to try to post a picture of two rifles that I have built in the last ten years...hope I'm successful.


100
STORM / Re: Pietta '51 Navy Grip Frame
« Last post by Niederlander on November 24, 2021, 11:50:40 AM »
I've got two Uberti '51 Navy's I've worked over pretty extensively.  Sometimes you just get a hankering for something new and different!
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