Author Topic: Cartidge Conversions prior to 1868  (Read 417 times)

Offline CitadelGrad08

  • Citizen
  • *
  • Posts: 5
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
Cartidge Conversions prior to 1868
« on: October 27, 2021, 11:53:42 AM »
Hello!

I was watching The Last Stand at Sabre River (great movie by the way) a few weeks ago which takes place in 1865. In one of the opening scenes a local family gunsmith explains to a cowpuncher how they modified his Colt to be a "custom made precision firearm" by "altering the hammer/cylinder installing a side ejector rod to punch out the empty shells."

My questions is this: would un-official cartridge conversions be available this early by various gunsmiths with the right know how or were such modifications not widespread until the Thuer style or later Richard-Mason conversions of 1868(ish) to 1871?

Follow up question: Are there any sources that show that cartridge conversions would have been done this early?

Being a movie I appreciated that they explained why most of the actors were using cartridge guns in 1865 even if I had to suspend disbelief due to historical accuracy.

Cheers

Offline Reverend P. Babcock Chase

  • Top Active Citizen
  • *
  • Posts: 224
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Cartidge Conversions prior to 1868
« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2021, 01:16:30 PM »
Howdy Citadel,

Just a guess, but maybe converted to shoot the Henry rimfire round.

Rev. Chase

Offline Dave T

  • NCOWS Member
  • Top Active Citizen
  • ***
  • Posts: 825
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 418
Re: Cartidge Conversions prior to 1868
« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2021, 05:58:12 PM »
Howdy Citadel,

Just a guess, but maybe converted to shoot the Henry rimfire round.

Rev. Chase

That's about the only way it would work.  The idea a "custom gunsmith" could modify a gun to his own design begs the question: where is he or his customer going to come up with ammo, or even brass?

Dave

Offline CitadelGrad08

  • Citizen
  • *
  • Posts: 5
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Cartidge Conversions prior to 1868
« Reply #3 on: October 27, 2021, 06:16:52 PM »
Both good points, this is a fun one to ponder for me even if it is highly unlikely.

I would imagine using the .44 rimfire used in the Henry would pretty much limit conversion choices to the 1860 Army or possibly the Dragoon. I would assume that if this was done at all it would have started in the Eastern side of the US to accommodate the ammo/brass supply issue. 


Offline Abilene

  • CAS-L Ghost Rider
  • Top Active Citizen
  • *
  • Posts: 3817
    • Abilene's CAS Pages
  • SASS #: 27489
  • NCOWS #: 3958
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 461
Re: Cartidge Conversions prior to 1868
« Reply #4 on: October 27, 2021, 10:21:27 PM »
Now you've got to go rewatch the movie while looking for a clear view of any ammo to see if centerfire or not.  ;D

Advertisers

  • Guest
Re: Cartidge Conversions prior to 1868
« Reply #5 on: Today at 05:16:18 AM »

Offline St. George

  • Deputy Marshal
  • Top Active Citizen
  • *
  • Posts: 4731
  • NCOWS , GAF, B.O.L.D., Order of St. George, SOCOM,
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Cartidge Conversions prior to 1868
« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2021, 10:33:46 PM »
Try finding a copy of McDowell's on 'A Study of Colt Conversions and Other Percussion Revolvers'.

It's long out of print, but can be found on the tertiary market.

And stop watching movies for actual historical content - 'artistic license' is a byword for Hollywood.

Scouts Out!
"It Wasn't Cowboys and Ponies - It Was Horses and Men.
It Wasn't Schoolboys and Ladies - It Was Cowtowns and Sin..."

Offline Galloway

  • Top Active Citizen
  • *
  • Posts: 477
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Cartidge Conversions prior to 1868
« Reply #6 on: October 27, 2021, 11:20:25 PM »
Here's a list of rimfire cartridges from the period, you'll see there are many more than just 44rimfire.

https://www.ammoandguncollector.com/p/complete-list-of-all-rimfire-ammo.html

Offline Jake MacReedy

  • Top Active Citizen
  • *
  • Posts: 336
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 5
Re: Cartidge Conversions prior to 1868
« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2021, 01:56:40 PM »
The Remington New Model Army revolvers converted in 1868, with S&W's blessing and a royalty paid, were chambered with a 5-shot cylinder in .46 rimfire.  These were the first "factory conversions" to come out.

Offline Rube Burrows

  • Top Active Citizen
  • *
  • Posts: 999
  • SASS #: 84934
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 326
Re: Cartidge Conversions prior to 1868
« Reply #8 on: November 17, 2021, 07:49:42 AM »
Try finding a copy of McDowell's on 'A Study of Colt Conversions and Other Percussion Revolvers'.

It's long out of print, but can be found on the tertiary market.

And stop watching movies for actual historical content - 'artistic license' is a byword for Hollywood.

Scouts Out!

Agreed. At least Tom Selleck tries really hard to get as close to accurate in a movie as can be. He really tries to have period things and use something other than the average 1873 Colt.
"If legal action will not work use lever action and administer the law with Winchesters" ~ Louis L'Amour

SASS# 84934
RATS#288

 

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk

© 1995 - 2021 CAScity.com