Author Topic: Your history of casting.  (Read 2532 times)

Offline Black River Smith

  • Top Active Citizen
  • *
  • Posts: 1050
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 2
Re: Your history of casting.
« Reply #20 on: December 28, 2020, 05:45:08 PM »
Do you guys use single cavities? Double? The Lyman handle fit all molds? I don't want to buy a bunch of stuff I don't need. Thanks for your help again.
Steve

See the Lyman bullet chart in link.  http://www.castpics.net/subsite/CurMolds/Lyman.pdf   See the text right below the Rifle mould title.  It states all rifle moulds are double cavity only and most rifle cavities require double mould handles.  But my 457191, 'bought new' mould is a single cavity???   Lyman requires specific size handles for either a single or double mould.

It has been stated 'elsewhere' and I have used them (when I don't want to dig for the right Lyman handles) - Lee six cavity handles work for both Lyman single and double cavity moulds.  I paid ~$18 for a pair on ebay or 2 for less than double that.

I like what Cap n Redneck states about Lee mold's.  To me they where cheap to start with until I could afford better molds like Lyman designs.  Only certain Lee molds have the lube grooves most old style firearms need for BP use, if then you want to use them for both smokeless and/or BP you are covered.

Greyhawk - Dusty,
I have seen the 'sawdust usage' as a flux.  A flux is just a carbon base material that changes the temperature enough to remove dirt and oxides of metals so they can be, removed and metals re-dissolved into the alloy, respectively.  I have saw dust around here at times, I don't save it for casting.  It burns/char's and smokes but it is not as flammable as melted liquified wax.  I just use the beeswax I have for lube making and try to light the smoke.  Flames over the lead diminish the amount of smoke.  Both have the same affects.

PS - King I reread the complete posts 'after posting this response' and saw that you already answered your own questions a few post later.  Sorry about this then.
Black River Smith

Offline greyhawk

  • Top Active Citizen
  • *
  • Posts: 953
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 32
Re: Your history of casting.
« Reply #21 on: December 28, 2020, 09:02:27 PM »
I like LEE molds (when/if the design suits Blackpowder) many dont have big enough lube grooves. They are easy to work with, light on the wrists, but can get overhot easy too - when they do, often the mold will warp out of alignment - LEE roundball molds make the neatest ball of any .
I have several brass molds from CBE here in Aus they are quite reasonable price.
The LEE long handles are best value for any brand mold that will take RCBS   
Another trick - buy up old LEE short handle molds for a few bucks - drill out the block retainer pins and a bit of fiddling (maybe some grinding) you have handles for those single cavity molds you dont use much but are missing handles.   

Offline Professor Marvel

  • purveyor of useless items to the gentry
  • American Plainsmen Society
  • Top Active Citizen
  • *
  • Posts: 2778
  • learn from the past, or be doomed to repeat it
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 449
Re: Your history of casting.
« Reply #22 on: December 28, 2020, 10:32:10 PM »
I’ve made most of the mistakes possible in casting, there maybe some that I don’t know about, but now it’s fairly easy to get good results.


I myself have made a lot of booboo's but I have not had the tinsel fairy visit... yet

I stick to pure scrap lead for BP and old wheelweight lead for smokeless ( ie faster) bullets. it seems hard enough and I am no longer interested
in trying to drive lead bullets up to 2000 fps...

I stay upwind of the pot, the fumes are not real healthy, but remember that you cannot get lead hot enough for metallic lead to be
in the fumes. It is the lead dust, lead oxide. Usually it gets on your hands and you get it in you by eating, drinking, smoking,
or wiping your lips or nose or face whilst casting.

Don't do that.

If one wears gloves, that helps prevent any lead particle poisoning.
Unless you go ahead and eat your sandwich with your lead-handling gloves on.  :-X

After casting lead (as a hobby) since before 1972, I get tested and show no detected heavy metals.
If I had done production casting, my results might be different. The folks I know with high lead worked
in indoor ranges with poor ventilation, and the they unintentionally inhaled the fine particles from the backstop plates.

Regarding molds, I have Lyman,  and other iron molds, but mostly Lee Aluminum.

If one takes care  of the Lee Molds, treats them correctly, reading and following the  instructions, they will last a very long
time . And Lee has always taken care of the one or two issues I ever had.

I use a hardwood stick to tap open the srue plate, with no issue.

If one abuses them, overheats them, and/or beats on them mercilessly, well, one will achieve a less harmonious outcome.

I see far too many operators fail to read and follow instructions and beat on their mechanical devices with a sledge hammer and
expect them to work better. Then get mad at the poor abused product, throw it away and complain bitterly and at length.

My wife once had a neighbor who had an old car that regulalry got vapor lock. She watched him get out an honest to gawd sledge hammer
from the trunk, lift the hood, and pound on the engine. Then it would start. Unfortunately, the moron did not realise that all he had to do
was wait the couple minutes it took to get the hammer and use it. Some people amaze me that they can continue to breathe without coaching.

yhs
prof amrvel
Your Humble Servant
~~~~~Professor Algernon Horatio Ubiquitous Marvel The First~~~~~~
President, CEO, Chairman,  and Chief Bottle Washer of
Professor Marvel's
Traveling Apothecary
and
Fortune Telling Emporium


Acclaimed By The Crowned Heads of Europe
Purveyor of Patent Remedies, Snake Oil, Powder, Percussion Caps, Cleaning Supplies, Dry Goods,
and
Picture Postcards

Offering Unwanted Advice for All Occasions
and
Providing Useless Items to the Gentry
Since 1822
[
Available by Appointment for Lectures on Any Topic

Offline dusty texian

  • Chief Scout Wehmeyer Ranch's.
  • Top Active Citizen
  • *
  • Posts: 2038
  • Dusty Texian
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 69
Re: Your history of casting.
« Reply #23 on: December 29, 2020, 08:30:49 AM »
I use Lee molds , Accurate molds of aluminum  and original steel Winchester and Lyman  molds , most of the Accurate molds I have ordered have been Aluminum by choice . The amount of casting I do I think the aluminum molds will last my lifetime .  Glad that Cap n Redneck brought up the handle fitting issue  that can be a cloudy area at first . Funny thing about molds , you start off with a few and somehow that few grows into a bunch before you know it . ,,,DT

Offline Montana Slim

  • NCOWS Member
  • Top Active Citizen
  • ***
  • Posts: 1888
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 9
Re: Your history of casting.
« Reply #24 on: December 29, 2020, 03:09:56 PM »
I definitely recommend the Lee 20# production pot.
I prefer to bottom pour with any mold, so I test this out before resorting to hand dipping. I evaluate based on quality (visual) & consistency (dims/weight). I do hand dip for a 7/8 oz shotgun slug. I also have to dip all my pure lead round balls & such as I converted a worn, old 10# electric pot many years ago.

My tips for bottom pour pots.
1) Always well-flux lead before using.
2) Never put "dirty" scrap lead into a bottom pour pot.

Reasoning is that the impurities (dirt) wears the valve shutoff components & it will drop...drop...drip.

3) Keep a small cast iron skillet under the spout (& expect a few minor drips) & this is also a good place to knock sprues into as well.
Western Reenacting                 Dark Lord of Soot
Live Action Shooting                 Pistoleer Extrordinaire
Firearms Consultant                  Gun Cleaning Specialist
NCOWS Life Member                 NRA Life Member

Advertisers

  • Guest
Re: Your history of casting.
« Reply #25 on: Today at 06:53:47 AM »

Offline Cliff Fendley

  • NCOWS Member
  • Top Active Citizen
  • ***
  • Posts: 3518
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 205
Re: Your history of casting.
« Reply #25 on: December 29, 2020, 04:28:10 PM »
My wife got me an RCBS pro-melt a couple years back for Christmas and I'm no expert on which is better but I really do love that bottom pour. Plus it has a good volume so once the molds are hot and pouring good I don't have to stop to add more lead to the pot and get everything the right temp again.

I always melt dirty lead in an old plumbers lead pot to flux and clean up and pour into clean ingots. I only put those clean lead ingots in my bottom pour pot.

It's probably just me not knowing what I'm doing but I have less trouble with steel molds. I have some Lee aluminum molds and my custom Accurate molds I've ordered in aluminum (for cost reasons) but I have to say the older steel molds I have less trouble getting them to pour good bullets and hold that heat and keep pouring. Seems like the aluminum I have a hard time getting the right temp and holding that temp. I guess because aluminum dissipates heat faster.

I'm all ears if someone can give me pointers on using the multiple cavity aluminum molds. Seams like I throw a lot of unsatisfactory bullets back in the melt.
http://www.fendleyknives.com/

NCOWS 3345  RATS 576 NRA Life member

Johnson County Rangers

Offline Dirty Dick

  • Top Active Citizen
  • *
  • Posts: 146
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 15
Re: Your history of casting.
« Reply #26 on: December 30, 2020, 08:54:02 AM »
Been casting bullets for 60 years, began with a single cavity Lyman mould, tiny Lyman pot on our kitchen stove,  for an El Tigre .44-40 carbine. A few years later I bought my Winchester 1886 in .40-65, $85.00, had it rebored to .45-70 (still have it today) and cast for it. In 1982 got the IPSC disease, Colt 1911 .45 ACP, bought RCBS Pro Melt, still works great today, two 6 cavity H&G and 8 cavity Saeco moulds, Star sizer, shot 40k+ rounds each year first two years to gain proficiency, went on to be Ontario Provincial champion 6 years, 1985-1988, 1991 and 1992, began the Accurate Bullet Company, sold millions of bullets, folded company when I quit IPSC after ten years. Started shooting cowboy action two years ago, .44-40, .38 Special and .45 Colt, now .45 cowboy special, just having fun with my cowboy guns now. Casting bullets is a hobby in itself to me, very enjoyable. Five cavity Accurate 43-215, 4 cavity Lyman 200gr swc and MP 8 cavity for .38 special.

Problems with bullet fill-out? Flux the metal well, use enough temperature, if using wheel weight metal add some tin, and the best thing I have found is to coat the cavities with Kroil using a Q tip, also the sprue cutter and pivot. It takes about ten casts or so after using Kroil to get unwrinkled bullets and Bob's yer uncle. To prevent mould rusting as soon as I finish casting the hot moulds go in a 20mm ammo can until next time. No oil needed. To remove oil from mould boil water in saucepan with a little detergent and scrub mould with an old toothbrush, dry with paper towel and cast bullets.

Just my $.02, your mileage may vary.  ;D
NRA Life, CSSA, RCA,

Offline Jeremiah Jones

  • Top Active Citizen
  • *
  • Posts: 140
  • NCOWS #: 3945
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Your history of casting.
« Reply #27 on: December 30, 2020, 09:02:03 AM »
Don't worry if your first 10-50 bullets are not "good".  Just throw them back in the melting pot.  It is part of the learning curve.  Just:
1.  Keep the wind at your back or side.
2.  No water/juice/coke/coffee/etc. around molten lead.
Scouts Out!

Offline King Medallion

  • Top Active Citizen
  • *
  • Posts: 839
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 68
Re: Your history of casting.
« Reply #28 on: December 30, 2020, 09:09:45 AM »

2.  No water/juice/coke/coffee/etc. around molten lead.

Thank Goodness! I drink Diet Pepsi, and it's not on the list! I'm saved!!  :D ;) ;) ;D

Thanks, men, for all your advice and knowledge. I've learn quite a bit from this thread already, I'm sure I'll learn more from this fine group.
Steve

Offline greyhawk

  • Top Active Citizen
  • *
  • Posts: 953
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 32
Re: Your history of casting.
« Reply #29 on: December 30, 2020, 08:07:40 PM »
My wife got me an RCBS pro-melt a couple years back for Christmas and I'm no expert on which is better but I really do love that bottom pour. Plus it has a good volume so once the molds are hot and pouring good I don't have to stop to add more lead to the pot and get everything the right temp again.

I always melt dirty lead in an old plumbers lead pot to flux and clean up and pour into clean ingots. I only put those clean lead ingots in my bottom pour pot.

It's probably just me not knowing what I'm doing but I have less trouble with steel molds. I have some Lee aluminum molds and my custom Accurate molds I've ordered in aluminum (for cost reasons) but I have to say the older steel molds I have less trouble getting them to pour good bullets and hold that heat and keep pouring. Seems like the aluminum I have a hard time getting the right temp and holding that temp. I guess because aluminum dissipates heat faster.

I'm all ears if someone can give me pointers on using the multiple cavity aluminum molds. Seams like I throw a lot of unsatisfactory bullets back in the melt.

1) Run hot!! go fast !!
2) Dont be afraid of what the gurus call frosted boolits --- they are well filled out and shoot just fine --- most of what I cast these days would be classed as frosted - its mostly caused from dropping from the mold quick.

Advertisers

  • Guest
Re: Your history of casting.
« Reply #30 on: Today at 06:53:47 AM »

Offline KenH

  • Very Active Citizen
  • *
  • Posts: 94
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 87
Re: Your history of casting.
« Reply #30 on: January 05, 2021, 04:48:48 PM »
........
My wife once had a neighbor who had an old car that regulalry got vapor lock. She watched him get out an honest to gawd sledge hammer from the trunk, lift the hood, and pound on the engine. Then it would start. Unfortunately, the moron did not realise that all he had to do was wait the couple minutes it took to get the hammer and use it. Some people amaze me that they can continue to breathe without coaching.
That's funny, and reminds me of when I was a 16 yr old teenager.  I rode an old '74 Harley (foot clutch, hand shift) that was of course kick start.  The old bike was fairly easy to flood a bit.  At the local drive-in when bike would flood I'd get off bike, walk around front (lots of folks watching), kick the front tire as hard as my old boots would kick, give bike a good cussing, slowly walk back 'n get on bike.  Get up on kickstarter, bike would usually fire off on first kick then. 

Many folks thought the cussing 'n kicking had something to do with starting - naw, just giving carburetor a bit of time to clear.  Would have worked just as good to sit on bike with folks watching me sit on a bike that wouldn't start.  A 16 yr old kid's ego can't take that.

Ooops, just realized this thread is about casting, not cranking motorcycles.  OK, I've been casting since early '70s.  I've got perhaps 30 or so molds now - all steel from those days and mostly Lee aluminum from the last 10 yrs or so.  I do enjoy casting, but shooting is more fun {g}

Later

Offline King Medallion

  • Top Active Citizen
  • *
  • Posts: 839
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 68
Re: Your history of casting.
« Reply #31 on: May 08, 2021, 08:46:25 AM »
Picked up an old Lyman #61 casting pot yesterday at a gun show. Looks to be in great shape, and has a brand new chord. Seller explained to me that the cords on these older models often got burnt out as they are pretty close to the heat. And that they are easily replaceable. Still waiting on the Accurate mold.

Offline Slamfire

  • Top Active Citizen
  • *
  • Posts: 863
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 15
Re: Your history of casting.
« Reply #32 on: May 09, 2021, 11:05:31 AM »
I have a Master Caster ,, but my LEE 4lb. pot gets a lot more use ,, "why ", don't have to fire up the MC, to try out a mold for the first time . And don't under estimate the 4lb'r it gets hot quicker ( 4lbs. vs 40lbs.,, duh !! ) cast all my 45-60's w/ it ( about 50 at a time ) set the dial at 5.5 - 6 , = 680-700+
degrees ( mixed lead ) use a therm. to ck. heat range. I also use the 4lb. a lot to preheat & flux lead for the MC., cuts down cooling time for the MC. Your new unit will work for your needs , enjoy.

 coffee's ready ,, Hootmix.

Offline King Medallion

  • Top Active Citizen
  • *
  • Posts: 839
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 68
Re: Your history of casting.
« Reply #33 on: May 09, 2021, 11:10:37 AM »
Good tips, thank you

Offline greyhawk

  • Top Active Citizen
  • *
  • Posts: 953
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 32
Re: Your history of casting.
« Reply #34 on: May 09, 2021, 06:51:01 PM »
You blokes would laugh
 I started casting for a 32/20 in 1963 at age 15, equipment was a beancan of battery lead on a little metho camping burner - ladle pour - I made that from the aluminium lid of a ketchup bottle rivetted to a piece of flat iron - squeezed a little point on it so it would pour - original Winchester mold of course. Made and shot a lot of boolits like that.

Never owned an electric pot - have no wish for one - present setup is the top off of an old propane kitchen stove that I revved up one burner - cast iron cooking pot holds about 40 pound of mix - I cobbled up a thermometer for the mix - ladle pour - best thing I did was bought a proper egg shaped ladle (Lyman I think) - boolits drop onto an old towell folded four times - the whole works sits on a trolley bench with wheels so I can position it for best light and wind - stand up to work . I cast ingots in old muffin pans and make sure I brand them what they are. All looks as rough as bags but it works good.     

Offline King Medallion

  • Top Active Citizen
  • *
  • Posts: 839
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 68
Re: Your history of casting.
« Reply #35 on: July 10, 2021, 03:04:32 PM »
1st attempt at casting today. Epic Fail!! Dint even get one bullet made. I see why this old lyman 61 pot was for sale. It took a looong time to melt the lead, when it finally did, I scrapped the crap off the top, positioned the mold under the spout, lifted the lever, and got exactly one small drop. One small drop does not make a big 50 bullet. scooped around in the pot to clear the spout. That seemed to work, got 4 drops next. but then the lead got solidish like it wasn't heating. Had the temp set at 725. Turned it up to even 775ish. wait. Finally got flowing lead. Now the lead flows but wouldnt flow thru the spout part of the mold, just a few drops in the clogged up the spout. Sorry I don't know all the technical names of everything. I'm guess this was because the mold wasn't hot enough or the lead was hot enough. Had the temp up to 825 and still had the same trouble so I got the rest of the lead poured into an ingot mold. Try another day with hopefully more advice on what i did wrong.
KM

Offline King Medallion

  • Top Active Citizen
  • *
  • Posts: 839
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 68
Re: Your history of casting.
« Reply #36 on: July 10, 2021, 03:31:06 PM »
I'm also thinking maybe I should get the proper attachment for my propane tank and use one of the Coleman camp stoves that somehow sometime appeared in the garage. I have a cast iron pot and a dipper. Looking at hot plates too.

Offline Black River Smith

  • Top Active Citizen
  • *
  • Posts: 1050
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 2
Re: Your history of casting.
« Reply #37 on: July 10, 2021, 08:55:21 PM »
Cast iron pot and a hot plate equals a no fuss wide mouth access point.  Then add the Lyman dipper you'll be in-control of your work.  Not the other way around.  Bee doing it this way for 30+ years, as stated earlier.  I thought about a Lee 20LB 4" high electric pot but never did take the plunge.  Just to easy to turn the electric hotplate to high wait 15 min and 10lbs of lead alloy is fully melted and ready to flux, clean dirt and dip/pour bullets.

Just wear leather gloves.

I have not been able to find any old cast iron pots in my area lately, so thought about trying Stainless Steel.  Don't know of any issues why Stainless would not work.  (Maybe would cool down faster than cast iron)???  Bought one but have not tried it out, yet.
Black River Smith

Offline Slamfire

  • Top Active Citizen
  • *
  • Posts: 863
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 15
Re: Your history of casting.
« Reply #38 on: July 11, 2021, 11:43:01 AM »
I'm just guessing here ,, but that O'L 61 ,sound like most all bottom pour units ,, they must be deep cleaned ,, especially the rod & spout ,,  once you have steel wooled the spout & rod,, add some water to see if it leaks ,, repeat until ,, it don't . I'v had to do 3 diff pour pot's and then they worked ,,, for me.
 I really think you will appreciate the bottom pour once get it working.  You can still dipper from it .

  coffee's ready ,, Hootmix.

Offline King Medallion

  • Top Active Citizen
  • *
  • Posts: 839
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 68
Re: Your history of casting.
« Reply #39 on: July 11, 2021, 02:18:22 PM »
Thanks for the tip!

 

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk

© 1995 - 2020 CAScity.com