Special Interests - Groups & Societies > The Winchester Model 1892

Rossi 92 in .44mag

(1/2) > >>

6MT:
Since getting rid of my Marlin carbine, I’ve had no lever option in .44mag. So I thought I would try out one of these…Rossi model 92’s….





So it has a 24” 1:26” twist octagonal barrel. (Nicely matches my two Uberti octagonal barrels)



And it also matches the Uberti’s with the solid butt plate.



So, first range trip to try it out today. I am shooting 240gr Campro FCP/TC (plated) bullets with LP magnum primers and 9.2gr of TiteGroup powder. This is not a bear bust’n load. But it’s not a real mild load either. Let’s just call it an easy to shoot plinking load. Easy on me, and the gun.

I am very used to 20” carbine levers in .38spl, .357mag, .44mag, and .45 Colt. Heck even 45-70, but that was with an 18.5” barrel. This Rossi has a 24” barrel. To say that there are differences in just four inches would be an understatement. And in differences, I mean shooting the thing. I’m sure there are a bit of performance differences too, but that’s not why I’m writing this.




It took me about a dozen rounds to realize that the longer sight radius isn’t as forgiving as the carbine’s. This was going to take a bit to get used to. The 92 action is smooth like butter. Taurus does a decent job with this replica. Fit and finish are pretty decent for an entry level firearm. The wood is Brazilian something, and very nice. It cycles perfectly and I had no hiccups. Except when I started, and it took me three trigger pulls to realize that the hammer safety was engaged when there were no bangs. (Embarrassing…yes.)

I have read that Rossi’s have a lot of sharp edges and things need to smooth out before you reach that sweet spot where everything works perfectly. The only thing I noticed was the loading gate. It is very stiff. My right thumb is complaining this evening. And I got sliced in the middle of the pad on my thumb by one of those sharp edges on the loading gate. But the nice thing about a 92 action, is that single loading can be done from the top. And I persevered.

It seems to be pretty accurate. This is where I come in. Because of this longer barrel and sight radius, I had some difficulty getting on target. I don’t have this problem with 1873 or 1894 actioned 20” carbines. Once I figured out that the sights were pretty much on, I quickly realized that I was the issue. Patience is a virtue. And with some of this new found patience, I started having some success. I was shooting at 100 metres. The buckhorn sights are really not my favourite, but I started to pick up where to hold and things looked better after 50 or so shots.

This longer barrel does shoulder easily. It feels very nice. Most of my shooting today was supported (bench shooting). But I started having some success offhand as well.

One thing that is quite different from the 1873 and 1894 actioned levers in my line up, is that this 92 action “hurls” spent cases skyward. Incredible how far you can eject a case with this. I was trying to think what else throws spent cases as far, and the only thing I could think of was the venerable SKS. Yes, it does throw them ten feet away from you if you cycle the lever quickly. No aiming the spent cases with this action. (So I did lots of running around picking up my brass.)

I ended up shooting its first 200 rounds today. I enjoyed it. One of the reasons I picked this up was the stupid wait times for Winchesters and even Taylor’s & Company 92 replicas. I’ve been on a wait list for a Winchester now for over two years. I needed to do something to get another .44mag in the stable. Rossi’s are decently priced too.

So if you’re looking for some fun, in any of the popular pistol calibers, I think you can’t do wrong with one of these Rossi’s.

DeaconKC:
I've had a couple over the years, but had sold them to other shooters as I acquired 73s [I shoot Classic] until a couple weeks ago at CaC and found a .357 with 20" barrel. Brought that puppy home with me and looking forward to shooting it this week. The wood on the Rossi's has been some sort of mahogany the last few years, so yours might be that.

Davem:
I've been thinking about that Rossi. I always thought Rossi might have quality issues but most folks think they are okay.  How do they compare with Taylor?
1. I'm not that familiar with the strength of the various actions. How strong was the '92?  Was it stronger than the '73? Stronger than the '94?
2. I thought the 24" barrel would have a longer sight radius and therefore be more accuate as far as the shooter.

Slamfire:
 6MT, money well spent, never regret'd buying mine (had a 20") I now have a 24", both in 44-40, and yes, the 24" does require a diff. sight pic. and both very accurate, and handy.

   coffee's ready,  Hootmix.

Trailrider:
The '92 was/is stronger than the '73. John Moses Browning designed them (and the '86) that way. Not saying you couldn't blow a 92 by Rossi or anybody else, but it can certainly take loads in the .44 Mangle-em listed for strong actions in any of the reloading manuals. The '92 is somewhat sensitive to the overall length of the cartridge. It can feed .44 Specials, if the OAL of the round is long enough. My CAS loads use the magnum case, with the powder charge reduced to SASS-legal levels (1,400 ft/sec). I use Hodgdon's Universal (when available), or Unique with a 213.5 gr. bullet. I adjust the charge weight to account for the slightly smaller case capacity than .44-40, to produce the same MV.  As to hot hunting loads, just stay within the handbook maximums.

Advertisers:

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version
Powered by SMFPacks Ads Manager Mod
Powered by SMFPacks Likes Pro Mod
Powered by SMFPacks Menu Editor Mod