Author Topic: Some Interesting historical background on the 1876 by Herbert Houze  (Read 514 times)

Offline Boone May

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I know Herbert Houze's Model 1876 is rare and expensive.  I found this online article written by Houze which covers some of the key material regarding the early development that developed into the 1876 rifle.  I hope this will be helpful.

https://www.ssusa.org/content/the-winchester-1876-centennial-rifle/
"There are a few things they didn't tell me when I hired on with this outfit."

Offline Coal Creek Griff

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Re: Some Interesting historical background on the 1876 by Herbert Houze
« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2022, 11:45:34 PM »
Thanks! That pieces together some of the jumbled information I've been hearing for some time.

Griff
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Offline Oregon Bill

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Re: Some Interesting historical background on the 1876 by Herbert Houze
« Reply #2 on: October 04, 2022, 08:50:25 AM »
And here is one of those prototype Winchesters sold by Rock Island Auction for $28,000 in 2016:
https://www.rockislandauction.com/detail/68/1025/winchester-prototype-rifle-455

Offline Little Dalton

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Re: Some Interesting historical background on the 1876 by Herbert Houze
« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2022, 08:14:05 PM »
I really enjoyed that article. So, according to Mr. Houze, 22" round barreled sporting rifles were the most common .50-95 variant? and less than 4,000 .50s made total? I sure would love to see more detail on the numbers.
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Offline Roosterman

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Re: Some Interesting historical background on the 1876 by Herbert Houze
« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2022, 09:33:20 AM »
I really enjoyed that article. So, according to Mr. Houze, 22" round barreled sporting rifles were the most common .50-95 variant? and less than 4,000 .50s made total? I sure would love to see more detail on the numbers.
I have seen far more octagon barreled standard length barreled 50 95's than anything else. Probably 50% I have seen also have british proofs. Americans didn't care for the big fifty for some reason, the brits took them to africa and india for soft skinned dangerous game...tigers  and such.  I don't know why the americans turned up their nose. I like them real well.
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Offline Roosterman

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Re: Some Interesting historical background on the 1876 by Herbert Houze
« Reply #5 on: November 23, 2022, 10:31:06 AM »
Just having a think on this.... There were probably more 50 95's made in the past 15 years than all of the original production of 50 95's in the last quarter of the 19th century.
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Offline Boone May

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Re: Some Interesting historical background on the 1876 by Herbert Houze
« Reply #6 on: November 23, 2022, 12:57:30 PM »
I have an 1876 Express rifle that was shipped to Burkhard Sporting Goods in St Paul, Minnesota in September, 1882.  It was returned to Winchester in December, 1882.  Shipped out again to an unknown location in July, 1883. 
Letter doesn't give any more information but one can presume it was unsold by Burkhard.  Or maybe it was just on loan for a sales promotion? 
It is a standard 26 inch octagon barrel.  Collectors refer to these as the American version as opposed to the British version with short 22 inch barrel.
Houze says the Express rifle had good sales over the years in its limited market. 

"There are a few things they didn't tell me when I hired on with this outfit."

Offline Coal Creek Griff

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Re: Some Interesting historical background on the 1876 by Herbert Houze
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2022, 01:12:11 PM »
I have an 1876 Express rifle that was shipped to Burkhard Sporting Goods in St Paul, Minnesota in September, 1882.  It was returned to Winchester in December, 1882.  Shipped out again to an unknown location in July, 1883. 
Letter doesn't give any more information but one can presume it was unsold by Burkhard.  Or maybe it was just on loan for a sales promotion? 
It is a standard 26 inch octagon barrel.  Collectors refer to these as the American version as opposed to the British version with short 22 inch barrel.
Houze says the Express rifle had good sales over the years in its limited market.

That is an AMASING looking rifle!  Thanks for the photo!

Griff
Manager, WT Ranch--Coal Creek Division

BOLD #921
BOSS #196
1860 Henry Rifle Shooter #173
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