Author Topic: Egg noodles  (Read 123 times)

Offline Delmonico

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Egg noodles
« on: October 15, 2019, 03:51:38 am »
Noodles



Noodles are defined as a narrow ribbon like strip of dough, usually made of flour, eggs and water.   Homemade noodles are a very cheap item to make and can be used to feed a large group of people very cheaply.   Noodles are most often cooked in a broth with some meat in it and sometimes vegetables are also added to it, I prefer beef and noodles, but chicken is perhaps the most popular, pork also make a good noodle dish.  Venison or other game also makes a good noodle dish.

I have found out that not only are noodles an inexpensive dish to serve they are one of the most requested dishes I do.  Although they are easy to do and really don?t take that much time to make a large batch, many folks think they are hard to make and time consuming.   This means they are a good demonstration to do in a public setting.  Some of the comments I have gotten range from having not seen them made for years, to folks being surprised that a person can make noodles from scratch, I guess they think only a noodle factory can make noodles. 

There are  many ways to make noodles, but the American way most often involve eggs, white flour and either water or milk, sometimes oil or lard are added.   One of the biggest differences is whether you use all whole eggs or use part yolk and part whole egg.   When you use more yolk you of course end up with a more yellow, richer noodles than with whole eggs.   One can add pepper and any herbs of your choice to noodles to give a bit different taste. 

Around our house, my wife and I use a different recipe, she makes them the way her aunt taught her and I make them the way my grandma made them. 

Glen's Noodles

4 cups flour
2 teaspoons salt
2 tablespoons of melted lard
4 egg yolks (slightly beaten)
2 whole eggs (slightly beaten and mixed with the whole eggs
4 tablespoons water (more or less)

Mix flour and salt, then add the lard and mix, make a mound out of the flour, with a well in it.  Add the eggs to this.  Mix well and add enough water to make a stiff dough.  Knead well and cover for 1/2 hour.

Rita's Noodles

4 cups flour
2 teaspoons salt
4 whole eggs (beaten slightly)
4 tablespoons of milk (more or less as needed)

Mix salt and flour and make the well as before.  Add the eggs and mix well, add enough milk to make a stiff dough and knead well, cover and let rest as above.

A third variation on the same theme is the one I use in camp, it is a bit of both recipes, I don?t always keep milk on hand except canned and it saves the trouble of separating the eggs.   

Glen's Camp Noodles

4 cups flour
2 tablespoons of melted lard
4 eggs (beaten slightly)
4 tablespoons of water (more or less)

Mix flour and salt, then add the lard and mix, make a mound out of the flour, with a well in it.  Add the eggs and yolks to this.  Mix well and add enough water to make a stiff dough.  Knead well and cover for 1/2 hour.

For either, take about 1/4 the dough and roll out thin on a well floured board, adding flour as needed.

Make them thick; make them thin, long or short, it doesn?t matter.   I cut them with a butcher knife; the dough can also be rolled like a jelly roll and cut.  Put a little flour in a bowl and toss them in as you cut, adding a bit of flour as needed to keep from sticking.

When done bring the meat and broth to a rapid boil and add a bit at a time and cover, simmer 10-15 minutes or until tender.   The extra flour will thicken the broth.  One can lay them out on a counter without the flour if one does not want the broth thickened, often hard in camp. 
As I said before, I prefer beef and noodles, but this will work as well with chicken and noodles or whatever you choose.  This is about right for a 12 inch deep dutch oven.  The amount of liquid will depend on what you want; I like my noodles to be able to be eaten with a fork so I stay on the low end of the amount of liquid I use. 

Meat and broth

2-4 quarts of water
1 pound of beef cut up or chicken parts
Onion, celery, carrots cut up (optional)
Salt and pepper (to taste)
With chicken I like to add a little sweet basil or rosemary

Put the water in the dutch oven and add other ingredients, simmer for an hour or until meat is tender, debone the chicken if desired.    While the meat and broth is simmering you can make the noodles. 

Although this is the way I use my homemade noodles, one is not limited to just this, these noodles can be used in any dish that calls for noodles.


I like big noodles as the picture shows.
Mongrel Historian


Always get the water for the coffee upstream from the herd.

Ab Ovo Usque ad Mala

The time has passed so quick, the years all run together now.

Offline Delmonico

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Re: Egg noodles
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2019, 03:58:30 am »
Not when I was cooking the beef there was some cut up bacon in it.  Leftovers from breakfast, what you don't eat this meal you likely will eat the next.


That has led to some odd dishes, and meatloaf in scrambled eggs is actually very good.😉
Mongrel Historian


Always get the water for the coffee upstream from the herd.

Ab Ovo Usque ad Mala

The time has passed so quick, the years all run together now.