Author Topic: Old sayings and what they mean.  (Read 3029 times)

Offline Judy Harder

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Re: Old sayings and what they mean.
« Reply #20 on: August 20, 2010, 05:28:48 pm »
the Good lord willing and the creek don't rise.

When someone says we will see you later, I say "if the Good Lord is willing"
and then I feel I must put in "and the creek don't rise"

I seem to remember this when I was a kid..but not sure it hasn't been in a song.
Today, I want to make a difference.
Here I am Lord, use me!

Offline twirldoggy

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Re: Old sayings and what they mean.
« Reply #21 on: August 23, 2010, 04:18:38 pm »
I remember this well:  People in the country frequently lived near creeks.  The dirt road to their house went through the creek because of the lack of bridges on country roads.  So when the creek rose, the road was impassable.  I believe this is where the saying comes from.


Online Diane Amberg

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Re: Old sayings and what they mean.
« Reply #22 on: August 23, 2010, 04:27:31 pm »
How about "let's talk turkey?"

Offline sixdogsmom

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Re: Old sayings and what they mean.
« Reply #23 on: August 23, 2010, 09:42:55 pm »
I must admit that I googled this and this response was so amusing that I copied it for your pleasure; here goes---

Interestingly, the phrase used to refer to pleasant chitchat. This may have started from the "nature of family conversation around the Thanksgiving dinner table." You know, everybody's happy, full, and on their best behavior.

As is often the case, the definition changed over time. However, the circumstances are open to debate. The Phrase Finder believes it had to do with the actual sounds a turkey makes. "Turkey gobbling was a distinct, natural sound on frontier farms." So, to "talk turkey" meant to skip the pleasantries and get to what's important, because farmers are a busy bunch.

Another theory exists, though it reads like more of a joke than documented fact. Way back when, a settler and a Native American went hunting for birds, and caught an equal number of turkeys and buzzards. When the pilgrim "divided the game, he took the two turkeys, leaving the buzzards for his companion." Justifiably annoyed, the Native American responded, "Stop talking birds, let's talk turkey."

Now, how about going to see a man about a dog?
Edie

Offline larryJ

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Re: Old sayings and what they mean.
« Reply #24 on: August 23, 2010, 10:54:51 pm »
pleased as punch------

Delighted, as in We were pleased as Punch when they asked us to be god-parents . This term alludes to the character Punch in Punch and Judy shows, who is always very happy when his evil deeds succeed. [Mid-1800s]


Larryj
HELP!  I'm talking and I can't shut up!

I came...  I saw...  I had NO idea what was going on...

Online Mom70x7

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Re: Old sayings and what they mean.
« Reply #25 on: August 27, 2010, 02:05:21 pm »
My grandfather used to talk about taking his morning constitutional.

Online Diane Amberg

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Re: Old sayings and what they mean.
« Reply #26 on: August 27, 2010, 02:12:48 pm »
Al still does ! ;D Also goes to see a man about a dog, as in doing something but not talking about it. How about "a turn coat?" That man is a turn coat.

Online Diane Amberg

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Re: Old sayings and what they mean.
« Reply #27 on: September 03, 2010, 05:43:32 pm »
Ok that one had no takers .Now,how about "he's got a chip on his shoulder?''Where did that one come from?

Online Mom70x7

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Re: Old sayings and what they mean.
« Reply #28 on: September 03, 2010, 11:55:28 pm »
I didn't realize "Turncoat" was this old. Here's what the Word Detective
Quote
http://www.word-detective.com/070401.html
says:

A "turncoat" is, of course, a traitor, a person (usually a soldier or political partisan) who reverses his or her principles or allegiances to the detriment of former friends. "Turncoat" first appeared in the "traitor" sense around 1557 and is still very much in use today, as I am sure the folks in the personnel department at the FBI are sorely aware.

The logic of "turncoat," much as I enjoy your theory, derives not from wearing one's coat backwards, but from turning it inside out. This was a fairly common practice with coats as well as shirts and trousers prior to the invention of dry-cleaning, as reversing one's clothing in this fashion presented a (somewhat) cleaner side to view. Although the term "turncoat" meaning a garment designed to be reversed has been dated back only to 1726, a reference to the practice of "turning" one's garments appears in Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew in 1593.

As for the association of "turning one's coat" with treason, the story (perhaps apocryphal) is told of the Duke of Saxony, whose land was uncomfortably located between the warring French and Saxons. The Duke, according to legend, wore a reversible coat, one side blue (the Saxon color), the other side white (the French color), allowing him to quickly change his display of allegiance should the need arise.

Online Mom70x7

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Re: Old sayings and what they mean.
« Reply #29 on: September 04, 2010, 12:10:33 am »
Again, quoting the Word Detective:
Quote
http://www.word-detective.com/041899.html

And "having a chip on one's shoulder" has actually been around for quite a while.

The earliest printed instance of the phrase listed in the Oxford English Dictionary comes from the Long Island Telegraph newspaper in May, 1830. This citation also provides what is probably a good explanation of the origin of the phrase: "When two churlish boys were determined to fight, a chip would be placed on the shoulder of one, and the other demanded to knock it off at his peril." (The "chip" was, in that age of wood stoves, most likely a chip of wood.) Evidently this belligerent ritual of childhood was sufficiently widespread at the time to become a grownup metaphor for combativeness, as it has been ever since.


That one I knew, but wasn't confident in my information.