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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  Special Interests - Groups & Societies  |  The American Plainsmen Society (Moderators: Caleb Hobbs, Tsalagidave)  |  Topic: What's in your Mess Kit? 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: What's in your Mess Kit?  (Read 1126 times)
Tsalagidave
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Dave Rodgers


« on: December 03, 2011, 07:02:04 pm »


I'm posting some shots of my US CW era and 1850s/CS CW mess kits that I carry on the trail.  My US painted haversack is assembled with a combination of machine and hand stitching as were the originals. Its also stenciled with my company number. The inner bag helped separate the food from the moisture and grime that can quickly accumulate. It separates and washes easily.  I generally carry a sack of beans, peas and dessicated vegetables in addition to crackers and salted meat. I have another bag for coffee/sugar and an original thick-glass mustard jar that I store molasses, honey or preserves in. The plate and cup are US issue (*Note, that is 1-rainy day's rust on it. Took about 90 minutes to turn that color.) The painted cloth bags were given by the US Sanitary commission. They are squared and seal with a drawstring. I have a selection of eating implements to choose from depending on the scenario. One is a folding sutlers device and the other is an original set of Knife, fork & spoon. The boiler carries easily in the bag on on the closure.

The other kit is with minimalism in mind.  I use either a painted militia haversack or a home made ticking haversack.  I like the light simplicity of this gear.  I use a frypan, spoon and my belt knife. (Sack of meal and dried meat not shown.) These are spot on for CS use or prewar militia.  The ticking bag looks annoyingly modern to the dismay of some reenactors but it is spot on with an original and I find it to be a great item to carry doves and quails in when I go out for a walk.

-Dave


* HSack Canteen.jpg (180.49 KB, 800x600 - viewed 209 times.)

* US Haversack.jpg (218.6 KB, 800x600 - viewed 173 times.)

* 1850 HSack.jpg (213.23 KB, 800x600 - viewed 134 times.)
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Oregon Bill
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« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2011, 07:50:40 pm »

Dave, I particularly admire your little sheet iron frying pan. Did you find that in an antique shop or are these available? Very well thought out and carefully chosen gear, as we have come to expect from you.
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pony express
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« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2011, 10:38:49 am »

I've seen those sheet iron pans in antique shops, but never paid much attention before....how can you tell if it's perion correct? I assume they were made over a long timespan.
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Major 2
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« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2011, 12:05:51 pm »

The frying pan is a nice touch ... I carry one and it serves as my plate....

The sheet iron pan with tin insulated handle is a bit later than your target time period...those began to show up in Dry good stores in the 1870's.

Mine was that style, I cut away the the stamped insulated handle and replace it with wrought iron or flat bar handle
sorta like this original ( mine was shorter )  

FYI The length on the one below serves well to keep the handle away from the fire.



* product_img_1019_250x250.jpg (20.13 KB, 250x250 - viewed 44 times.)
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WaddWatsonEllis
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Howdy, Pardner! Sacramento, Ca here ....


« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2011, 12:15:00 pm »

I tried this late last night and it would not 'take' ... let's see what happens in the light of day ...

The Possibles Shop used to sell a Possibles Bag in a kit .... actually made by October Country. I ordered extra leather and added a patch knife sheath to the aft end and  a credit card size poket to the front to hold a nipple prick and old style screwdriver ... here are some pics:







Reenacting this summer with the bag on my side:



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My moniker is my great grandfather's name. He served with the 2nd Florida Mounted Regiment in the Civil War. Afterward, he came home, packed his wife into a wagon, and was one of the first NorteAmericanos on the Frio River southwest of San Antonio ..... Kinda where present day Dilley is ...

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Tsalagidave
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Dave Rodgers


« Reply #5 on: December 04, 2011, 02:45:26 pm »

Major2 nailed it and I should have added the disclaimer (sorry all) the frypan I featured in the picture is a later model that I am using after losing a really nice period model that I used to have.

Jarnagin has a good frypan http://www.jarnaginco.com/catframe.html but the best resources seem to still be local blacksmiths that still make them for authentic reenactors. I have been putting off buying a good replacement but all of my pards are sworn to holding me accountable so it looks like I'll just break down and go buy one.

Thanks

-Dave
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pony express
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« Reply #6 on: December 04, 2011, 03:24:44 pm »

That's good to know about the different handles. So, one with a handle like in your picture would be good for my usual personna, a late indian wars/Spanish American war soldier, who might want something a bit better for cooking his rations in than what the Army provided...
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Oregon Bill
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« Reply #7 on: December 04, 2011, 09:00:26 pm »

Dave: Know anything about Jarnigan's "heavy tin plates"? I'm wondering how the tin plating holds up to knives and forks, assuming they are in fact steel or iron plated with tin.
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Tsalagidave
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Dave Rodgers


« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2011, 05:47:27 pm »

Good question Bill. The old tin plate I have is from another sutler and completely roasted out after years of use. Jarnagin really shaped up their product line when they started losing a lot of their marketshare to small vendors focused on high authenticity (and sometimes price) items and I have seen some really good tin come out of them. I know of a lot of good blacksmiths & tinsmiths.  It would make a good thread for later on tonight.

-Dave
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Tascosa Joe
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« Reply #9 on: December 21, 2011, 09:42:45 am »

Dave:
What material did you use to make the red and blue bags in the photo?  They appear to be oil skin or even a waxed paper?
Joe
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Tsalagidave
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Dave Rodgers


« Reply #10 on: December 21, 2011, 02:29:45 pm »

Joe,

I'd love to take credit for those bags but they were made by a gentleman named Troy Groves. Attached is a link to his thread in the Authentic Campaigner that shows the patterns. http://www.authentic-campaigner.com/forum/showthread.php?14934-USSC-Patterns

It is a painted (enameled) cloth with a flat, squared bottom, taped lip and drawstring enclosure. These ration bags are very effective at keeping the elements off food.  Just be sure that you us a non-toxic paint.  Grin

-Dave
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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  Special Interests - Groups & Societies  |  The American Plainsmen Society (Moderators: Caleb Hobbs, Tsalagidave)  |  Topic: What's in your Mess Kit? « previous next »
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