COLT, MODEL 1851 NAVY REVOLVER, FACTORY ENGRAVED..A GUN WITH HISTORY!!

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COLT, MODEL 1851 NAVY REVOLVER, FACTORY ENGRAVED WITH FACTORY CARVED IVORY GRIPS, HISTORICALLY INSCRIBED TO CONFEDERATE COLONEL MICHAEL BULGER OF THE 47TH ALABAMA INFANTRY.
This Navy Revolver is one of the better items that we have been fortunate enough to enjoy, own and market. It is in fine condition. Sharp and crisp in every respect and worthy of an outstanding collection of Civil War Artifacts of the highest quality and historical significance. HISTORY; Commissioned a Captain in Company A of the 47th Alabama Infantry in March 1862. His regiment's baptism of fire came at the battle of Cedar Mountain on August 9, 1862. While in command of the 47th during this clash, he received two severe wounds that necessitated a leave of absence to restore his health, and it was during this convalesce that he was elected to represent his district in the Alabama State Senate. He returned to his duties at the grade of Lieutenant Colonel, and was present with the regiment at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. The Confederate efforts to seize the high ground known as "Little Round Top" occurred July 2, 1863, and the elder Bulger did not lack courage during this desperate hour the old man climbed atop a boulder and "waved his sword at the Federals while urging his Alabamians" onward. This presentation of gallantry came with a severe cost however. By standing tall on the boulder, he offered a grand target and eventually, a Union marksman fired a round that found its mark. Hit in the lung, Bulger withdrew down the hill to the safety of another boulder. There, amidst the ongoing battle, he sat himself down to await his fate, and with blood freely flowing from his mouth and nostrils, began to suffer the effects of his wound. He was a dying man. With the ultimate repulse of the Confederate forces, the wounded Bulger was left behind and was reported to have been killed while "fighting most nobly". Colonel James Clay Rice of the 44th New York Infantry soon appeared and the Confederate officer officially surrendered his sword. Colonel Rice personally instructed his men to transfer Bulger to the attention of a Federal surgeon. Later, Bulger let it be known "that the compassion shown by Rice saved his life." Conveyed to Johnson's Island near Sandusky, Ohio as a prisoner, his war was effectively over. He was exchanged in March 1864. During his tenure as a prisoner-of-war, he was promoted Colonel. The war concluded with him as a member of the Invalid Corps, and upon returning to his adoptive state of Alabama, he farmed and continued his involvement in politics.




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