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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  Special Interests - Groups & Societies  |  Cas City Historical Society (Moderators: St. George, Silver Creek Slim)  |  Topic: What gear would an 1860 Californio carry with him? 0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: What gear would an 1860 Californio carry with him?  (Read 64893 times)
Roscoe Coles
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« Reply #25 on: September 13, 2009, 07:49:50 pm »

Glad to hear about the 1851, its the right way to go.  As far as some of the other things go let me say that as a historian and someone who has spent years interpreting California history professionally, its far better to leave something out of your impression if its wrong than to bring it along just to have something.  In other words, if you know your knife or anything else is wrong, why bring it?  Decide what your impression is, get the key things, the clothing, the shoes, the hat, etc. and make them good.  From there build up your impression one piece at a time.  If you bring the wrong stuff just to have it, people will know and you loose your credibility.  You never know who is in the crowd.

I'll give you an example.  While interpreting the history of the US Navy in the Mexican War, dressed as a sailor at Sutter's Fort one afternoon I gave a long talk to a group of people about Anglo American naval relations and their effect on American Naval orders in the Pacific prior to the second invasion of Monterey.  After the talk a man came up and talked with me a little and it was clear that he knew what he was talking about, in our conversation we bandied some things back and forth, I talked about what I had read and thought and said "I don't know" when I didn't.  At the end of the talk he introduced himself as a naval officer and a professor of Naval history at the Naval Academy and complimented me on my talk.  Now, if I had not done my homework  or just assumed that no one there would know about my topic I would have been doing them and myself a great disservice and butchering history to boot.  I would also never have found out that I made an ass of myself in front of someone who really knew.  Instead I had a nice conversation, learned some things and gained a good deal of credibility.

I was a docent and a Park Interpretive Specialist for California State Parks, at Sutter's Fort for years before heading off to graduate school for my Masters and Ph.D. in Historical archaeology (not quite done with the doctorate!) but never did the Old Town stuff.  But I would assume that they have guidelines and authenticity people who will help you get it right.  But make sure that you are always touching back to the history and primary source material.  Aside from that, enjoy yourself, tell people what you know, admit what you don't, remember that you are representing real people who can no longer speak for themselves and do your best to get it right.
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WaddWatsonEllis
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Howdy, Pardner! Sacramento, Ca here ....


« Reply #26 on: September 13, 2009, 11:37:23 pm »

Roscoe Coles,

It was exactly for this reason that I started this thread ... I figured that there would be people who knew much more than me about this area ... I mean, deep inside I am a frustrated historian, but, as I have quoted Voltaire as saying, 'History is the lies historians agree upon' .... kind of like Hollywood Westerns ....

It looks like I may have the '51 Colt ... no holster for it yet, but I may tuck it into a sash wrapped about my waist ...

James Hunt,

I don't think that people took their reattas off their saddle when they reached town, so it would not be with me when walking around ... and as far as those Sonora Spurs, I am thinking about having a blacksmith make me some Sonoran rowels and just add them to my present spurs ...

That is, after I pay for the Rugers, the '51 Colt, the gun leather , the Vaquero jacket, the ...
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My moniker is my great grandfather's name. He served with the 2nd Florida Mounted Regiment in the Civil War. Afterward, he came home, packed his wife into a wagon, and was one of the first NorteAmericanos on the Frio River southwest of San Antonio ..... Kinda where present day Dilley is ...

"Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyway." John Wayne
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Roscoe Coles
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« Reply #27 on: September 13, 2009, 11:46:46 pm »

Hey Wadd,
   Well, Voltaire aside, there is history and then there is history.  The level we are talking about is basically "what."  Where historians tend to get into big fights is "why" and "what does it mean."  I think that you will find that there is a considerable amount of disagreement in history and the interesting part is that history is multi vocal, which means that many things can be true at the same time.  History, like life, is complicated and messy and its easy to spend a lifetime getting a grasp on even a small part of it. 

Have fun
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Dr. Bob
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« Reply #28 on: September 13, 2009, 11:52:50 pm »

Hi WWE,

Here is a Spanish style knife at a reasonable price!

     http://www.crazycrow.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=CCTP&Product_Code=4926-012-002&Category_Code=841-400-000

Give it a look.  Good researching!!! Grin
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Howdy, Pardner! Sacramento, Ca here ....


« Reply #29 on: September 14, 2009, 12:07:19 am »

Dr Bob,

Thanks: I put it on my favorites list for a later purchase ....

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My moniker is my great grandfather's name. He served with the 2nd Florida Mounted Regiment in the Civil War. Afterward, he came home, packed his wife into a wagon, and was one of the first NorteAmericanos on the Frio River southwest of San Antonio ..... Kinda where present day Dilley is ...

"Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyway." John Wayne
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« Reply #30 on: September 14, 2009, 12:21:39 am »

Hi WWE,

Been buying from Crazy Crow for 20+ years.  I thought that they had an appropriate knife for you.  Glad that bit of info didn't pass on through the old steel sieve! Roll Eyes Shocked Wink
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« Reply #31 on: September 14, 2009, 01:15:55 am »

Its definitely a good looking knife ....

I would have ordered it tonight but with three pistols, two gunbelts, and a holster already purchased, my fixed income is a little sparse ... but it is definitely on the list for the next purchase .... in fact, I am going to have to check out the entire line ....*S*
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My moniker is my great grandfather's name. He served with the 2nd Florida Mounted Regiment in the Civil War. Afterward, he came home, packed his wife into a wagon, and was one of the first NorteAmericanos on the Frio River southwest of San Antonio ..... Kinda where present day Dilley is ...

"Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyway." John Wayne
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ChuckBurrows
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« Reply #32 on: September 14, 2009, 02:06:25 am »

Here are just a few prints of Californio caballeros circa 1850-1870's by artist James Walker - several others have been published in various books. Charro is more correctly applied to the traditional cowboys of central and northern Mexico rather than the rancheros, caballeros, and vaqueros of California - in Spain charro was applied to a member of the lower classes who herded cattle. FWIW I learned to ride and work cattle in the traditional California manner in the late 1960's and early 1970's and never heard the term charro used there - they were rancheros, caballeros, or vaqueros. It was in the Santa Barbara and north to Paso Robles region where many of the old Californio ways are still maintained today.









A pair of Californios - one of whom is packing a Walker Colt on a belt holster...both are fairly plainly dressed and rather than just plain buttons on their calzoneras such as  shown in Walker's paintings these have the ball and chain style closure. While IMO it was not common to carry horse pistols on ones belt, this is just one a few pics there is of folks carrying Walkers or Dragoons in a belt holster so it was done - but an 1851 is a whole lot more comfortable!


Here's a treatise on Californio entertainment up to 1848 in PDF format with several period sketches
http://www.josealamillo.com/hispanicalifentertainment.pdf

Quote
Bowie knives are an American phenomenon and you would not find them on a Californio.  Why would they want one, they have their own style of knives which is much more European.   Think European stiletto, thin, double sided and relatively long.
With due respect I see no reason that a Californio especially of the later period would not carry a Bowie - they certainly carried Colt Revolvers and other "American" weapons.
1) Not only were thousands of Bowies brought to California by the 49ers and later emigrants, but two of the most prominent makers of Bowies were in San Francisco, Michael Price and Will & Finck. Also there are provenanced Bowies made in the Spanish Southwest by local smiths.
While the Californios did retain much of their Spanish culture as well as possible and especially for fandangos, there is plenty of documentation for adoption of "Anglo" gear especially after California became a state - period photographic evidence as well as written documentation often shows the upper classes, espcially those who were doing business with the Anglos wearing Anglo style suits and the women wearing imported dresses. Anglos had been marrying into the upper crust families from the early 1800's - sea men and traders from the east were frequent visitors and Californios traveled east trading horses, mules, and sheep. In 1846 George F Ruxton while traveling to St Louis from Bent's fort met a California vaquero who amazed him with his roping skills - even roping buffalo calves.
2) On the other hand a Belduque similar to that linked to by Dr Bob would be more "Californio" and was THE knife of the working man in the Spanish areas, be he rich or poor. In fact the earliest known Bowies such as the Searles, are variations on the Belduque which is the Spanish version of the ubiquitous working knife used throughout the Mediterranean area. The Crazy Crow model is not bad but a better example can be made by watching for a decent quality "French" chef's knife and slightly re-doing the handle and maybe lightly etching the blade to remove the name makes an excellent copy. Watch for them at second hand stores - Sabatier and Henkels make good ones and even the J Russell Company aka Green River Knifeworks makes a decent one that can be easily adapted. Another source is to watch for the the Gaucho knives on Ebay, etc. - The Cuchillo Criollo and Facon are the same basic knife as the Belduque.
3) While stilettos were carried/used they are almost strictly a fighting knife. A problem may also rear it's ugly head - Due to the double edged blade they are often illegal for modern carry especially in California - being a custom knife maker I'm all too aware of the legal problems daggers/stilettos can cause in various areas throughout the USA.
Quote
Remember the period if your year is 1860 or thereabout. Anglo's and the Hispanic culture were not mixing well.
This would depend on whether you were a newcomer Anglo or one who had been here for years - as noted above there had been a faiurly congenial mix of the two cultures for many years and including many of the older Spaniards who had been part of the 1846 Bear War on the American side.

As to Caliifornia style spurs - prices can vary considerably dependent on style and decoration - earlier ones in particular were often left undecorated except for the decorative work of the blacksmith (call me about both spurs and rowels - I can probably fix you up.......)
Reatas - while custom made rawhide reats are expensive - the vaqueros I worked with back "when" preferred 8 or 12 plait in 60-80 ft lengths. There are places such as El Paso Saddle Blanket that sell pretty fair representative examples in 4 plait.
Perhaps more appropriate than a reata though would be a braided rawhide quirt which again can be found at many price points from cheap to expensive.

Quote
whatever you do don't get any of the nickel spotted stuff
While I agree that Sterling or Coin silver would be "better", nickel aka "German Silver" (which was developed in the early 1800's to imitate real silver at a lesser price) is a decent and relatively inexpensive "replacement" for the real McCoy. While in the east "harness" spots are generally considered to be a late 1880's-90's decoration (but they do show up on Texas/Great Plains gear from at least as early as the 1860's) the Spanish all over the Southwest just loved such "gaudy" decoration as silver buttons, spots, and conchos so based on the period documentation it would not be out of place if done properly. Take a look at the horse gear above that is rife with spots albeit again most likely made from real silver. Also here's a pic of Geronimo's holster and gunbelt which has lots of spots and conchoss. It is of Mexican manufacture of unknown date - probably 1870's though, since IIRC it was taken from the Yawner early in the 1880's, but such work can be documented to much earlier here in the Spanish Southwest. Also note the Spear point Bowie and the fact that the holster is one of the few documented "slanted" holsters that I know of - it also was built for a 7.5" barreled gun rather then the 5.5" Colt shown.




BTW - Roscoe I'm the maker of those botas you pictured above - note in Walker's image the botas are worn over the pantalones but under the open legged calzoneras........this would be fine way to wear them in the open grasslands of central California but that sure wouldn't work in brush country!
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« Reply #33 on: September 14, 2009, 03:04:09 am »

Here's a few more Walker paintings:

Three things to note in these first two:
1) The Spanish birdshead handled knife sticking out of the botas - this is the classic shape of a Beldque's handle
2) The tooled botas - this was done by heating a metal plate with the design engraved/etched in it and then pressing the hide (usually brained or alum tawed deer or goat) between the heated plate and a base plate
3) In the second pic you can see the sword that was often carried by the rancheros as noted by Roscoe




In these next two you can see the silk "pirate" headscarf being worn - a quite common piece of clothing in the Spanish SW. The second image is only a partial image - it shows then folks at a fandango and the activity going on is one in which a chicken was buried up to it's neck and then the riders came along at a gallop and try to grab the chicken by the neck - it showed up teh riders skills but was not fun for the chicken who wound up being roasted or thrown in the stew pot.......




One thing to note about all of Walker's painting - while there is a great deal of important historical detail in them they are still paintings not phtographs and paintings that illustrate a somewhat "romanticized" view of the time and place as did/does most period art work - as always it pays to cross reference as much as possible........

Well it's late and I've got a long day in the shop ahead of me so for now buenas noches...
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« Reply #34 on: September 14, 2009, 12:41:29 pm »

Chuck Burrows: Very good post, outstanding information. Thanks for the Walker paintings. He is clearly the Alfred Jacob Miller of Californio culture although you are right he suffers the same criticism as Miller (they ginned up their work a bit for whatever reason). And thank you for clearing up my muddying the waters with Charro vs Vaquero. I guess my intent was to infer look at the charro groups that exist in California today as an example of fancy gentry style dress - but it sure didn't come across like that.

While I understand your comment regarding the use of nickel silver spots and accouterments - I don't know, it just doesn't look right to me. It looks like..., nickel silver. I could not afford real silver for my saddle so I got Mexican 8 and 4 reales with dates prior to 1870 on ebay and made them into conchos and used them. They looked good and when you do not desire either collectability or quality can be had rather cheaply on ebay, much cheaper than real silver decoration that is for sure. My resarch indicated that these were used, at least by anglos in Texas at the end of the 19th century.

I am fascinated with the horse culture of the Vaquero and today's buckaroo.Not much of a demand for that in Michigan however. I do well to keep my seat and catch a fence post (if it remains absolutely still) with a poly. Grin


WaddWatsonEllis: Not to pile on with the expenses but you can consider the following resources as life evolves for you:

Quirt - Ebay has some reasonably priced braided quirts from time to time, below is one probably vintage which I picked up for less than $40. I got it cause it mirrors one illustrated in "Cowboys and Trappings of the Old West"



Also, there used to be some guy selling on ebay braided quirts made in Mexico, that don't look bad for pretty cheap - quality unkown.

Short Jacket - An unlikely source for a short jacket is the blanket folks at Northwest Traders - www.nwtrader.com/ - they do not advertise them, but there is some guy there making them and they take them to the shows. Below is one I got. It is rather course wool/linen blend with a finer linen lining with ribbon highlights. You might give them a call when you are ready as their price is very reasonable for correct work. Mine is supposedly a copy of one from a Walker painting circa 1830's.



And finally, when that lottery ticket comes in, Joe DeLaronde makes handforged belduques that just make you want to quit your day job and learn how to use the spade bit. These can be found at www.delarondeforge.com/Knives.htm - below is mine purchased when Wall street was still making money:



He also makes some of the best hand forged spanish colonial spurs I have ever seen! We are talking second mortgag here though. Bankruptcy following excessive credit care use is always an option! Grin

I got this stuff because I am enamored of the Californio culture, now I'm all dressed up with no place to go. Undecided  My Morgan would draw the line at roping grizzlies however.  Shocked

By the way I still highly recommend Dary's book as a beginning resource. Regards.



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« Reply #35 on: September 14, 2009, 05:26:51 pm »

I am constantly amazed with the amount of knowledge we have here at CAS City.  I don't mean wannabe historians but people who really know what they are talking about.  Thanks everyone for adding to my knowledge of this fascinating period of California history.

Will Ketchum
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« Reply #36 on: September 14, 2009, 08:43:54 pm »

Chuck:
  Good stuff and thanks for the information on the spanish style working knives.  I forgot to mention them and they are ubiquitous and pretty cheap.  I think I will stick with my comments about the bowie knife not being something that would be used by Californios however.  They had their own style of knives and I think they would stick with them.  As for bowies being adopted by Californios, instead of saying "they could have used them" I think we should ask is there any historical data to show that they did.  I have always encouraged folks to adopt what was most common when building an outfit for historic interpretation, this way they don't have to come up with elaborate explanations for why they have something thats not really in character.

I always think about an infamous picture of a confederate officer wearing what looks to be a set of ocelot chaps and holsters.  Did this guy exist, yep and there is a photo to prove it!   Should everyone doing a confederate officer impression go out and buy ocelot chaps and holsters?  Probably not.  In fact, probably no one should.  Its just to far outside the norm.   Pick your persona, do the history to find out what would be correct for that person, and get that.

On another topic, folks are correct that many high status californios were adopting American style clothing and other things in the late 1850s and 1860.  One of the best examples is General Mariano Vallejo, who not only dressed in American style clothing but built a yankee gothic style home near Sonoma.  both the house and the clothing are strong statements about who Vallejo wanted to be allied with.  However, I think the photographic evidence of californios during this period shows that A) this was an upper class phenomenon and B) that californio and American styles were not commonly mixed.  I can't think of any of photographs of californios that show people mixing styles, with the exception of the addition of firearms.  Eventually the californio styles simply went out of fashion for daily wear though they remain to this day for dress or ceremonial wear, for example during the Fiesta days parades in Santa Barbara where I grew up. 

As with everything I could be wrong but I would love to see any primary evidence of californios mixing traditional and American styles. 

Very interesting discussion.
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« Reply #37 on: September 14, 2009, 08:50:52 pm »

While I have never seen the photo of the confederate officer with the ocelot chaps/holsters, I have seen mid 40s through 60s saddle accutrements from the Mexican region that used exotic furs.  Would that have been Californio appropriate, or further south?

I would love to see the confederate picture as well if someone can point me that direction.  (we would have thought him a tad fancy for our border unpleasantness.) 
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Howdy, Pardner! Sacramento, Ca here ....


« Reply #38 on: September 15, 2009, 12:13:36 am »

James Hunt, Will Ketchum, Roscoe Coles & Mogorilla et al,

Just to keep y'all in the loop, I have:

Bought a Pietta Navy 1851 in .44cal.

Bought a Belduque from Northwest Traders

Am having a traditionally correct belt made for the Californio period ... and will tuck the pistol in the belt until I can afford to have a slim jim made. At the time the holster is made, I will probably have a six or seven inch wide 'bullet pouch' made to go in the small of my back (To not only hold bullets and a powder flask, but tobaccky and all the other things a gentleman would carry with him....

Have bought a Vaquero Jacket, and have frontier pants and vest that match. When I find a wide collared linen shirt with a button plaquete (sp?), I will wear that under the vest with a 'wild rag' folded and tied underneath. The whole outfit will be topped off by a palm straw 'Sam Houston' style hat ... much the same one that John Sutter was very fond of ...

If this docent position 'takes', I am thinking about purchasing some matching leather and a ton of 'silver' buttons ... then slitting the pants to the knee and having buttons sewn from hip to ankle to emulate calzoneras ....

And that's the story so far ...

Thanks to all who have given input to what I should need to carry ... I will have to keep a lookout on Craigslist for a quirt ...

And James Hunt, I am going to order that book through the library system ... and if it looks like I should, I'll pick one up on Amazon.com or some such....
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My moniker is my great grandfather's name. He served with the 2nd Florida Mounted Regiment in the Civil War. Afterward, he came home, packed his wife into a wagon, and was one of the first NorteAmericanos on the Frio River southwest of San Antonio ..... Kinda where present day Dilley is ...

"Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyway." John Wayne
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« Reply #39 on: September 15, 2009, 08:25:08 am »

This might come as a surprise - but the Colt Model 1851 was in caliber .36 'only' - the .44 being an Italian manufacturer's idea of exotica to tempt gullible buyers.

'Navy' indicated the .36 caliber - while 'Army' indicated the .44.

You can find a very 'usable' Slim Jim from 'Oklahoma Leather' - just cover the logo with a concho and thong, and you'll have what was common.

You don't need any more of a belt than one made of a smooth, plain leather - with a frame buckle.

Men of the time used a vest to carry his makin's and for miscellaneous things - including a pocket powder flask or a packet of paper cartridges.

Vaya,

Scouts Out!

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« Reply #40 on: September 15, 2009, 08:49:23 am »

As an aside, for those who are contemplating the Impression.

River Junction Trade Co. - www.riverjunction.com - now offers a 'Vaquero Jacket' for $159.95 - with matching trousers coming soon.

Vaya,

Scouts Out!

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Howdy, Pardner! Sacramento, Ca here ....


« Reply #41 on: September 15, 2009, 08:04:26 pm »

For the same price, Sacramento Dry Goods offers a leather trimmed 'more fancy' Vaquero Jacket ...

But I really like the 'Transitional Holster' and quirt on their website ....


* Vaquero Jacket.jpg (42.15 KB, 366x500 - viewed 451 times.)

* transitional holster River City Junction.jpg (6.25 KB, 135x237 - viewed 444 times.)

* Quirt River City Junction.jpg (14.58 KB, 250x495 - viewed 348 times.)
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My moniker is my great grandfather's name. He served with the 2nd Florida Mounted Regiment in the Civil War. Afterward, he came home, packed his wife into a wagon, and was one of the first NorteAmericanos on the Frio River southwest of San Antonio ..... Kinda where present day Dilley is ...

"Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyway." John Wayne
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Howdy, Pardner! Sacramento, Ca here ....


« Reply #42 on: September 15, 2009, 09:35:29 pm »

I am so Chuffed! (Brit for excited...)

I just got hold of my two Ruger Old Armies (I know, I know, much to late for this period ... but they will make good reenactment guns ....

All the same, they are really nice weapons ... been gunslicked til they are smooth as buttah, have had Uncle Mike Nipples put on them, and nice faux bone grips ... last time I felt this good, I was in love ... or so I thought ....*L*

Kind of a shame not to compete with them ... maybe I might when I get to know a little more about 'The Dark Side"....


* Ruger Old Armies1.jpg (27.23 KB, 400x300 - viewed 356 times.)
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My moniker is my great grandfather's name. He served with the 2nd Florida Mounted Regiment in the Civil War. Afterward, he came home, packed his wife into a wagon, and was one of the first NorteAmericanos on the Frio River southwest of San Antonio ..... Kinda where present day Dilley is ...

"Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyway." John Wayne
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Howdy, Pardner! Sacramento, Ca here ....


« Reply #43 on: September 16, 2009, 01:43:08 am »

Sacramento Dry Goods also offers this Vaquero Coat in Black, Navy, or Chocolate Brown ...
Here is their website:

http://www.saccitydrygoods.com/


* Vaquero Jacket Sacto Dry Goods.jpg (47.05 KB, 385x500 - viewed 364 times.)
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My moniker is my great grandfather's name. He served with the 2nd Florida Mounted Regiment in the Civil War. Afterward, he came home, packed his wife into a wagon, and was one of the first NorteAmericanos on the Frio River southwest of San Antonio ..... Kinda where present day Dilley is ...

"Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyway." John Wayne
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Howdy, Pardner! Sacramento, Ca here ....


« Reply #44 on: September 16, 2009, 09:42:46 am »

Still looking at holsters ....

I was looking at a holster that is in Will Ghormley's sale bin.

Does this look like something that might be seen on a somewhat 'dandy' Californio?

When I spoke with Will, he suggested that I get the opinion of the members here ....



* 35s.jpg (139.9 KB, 640x1370 - viewed 304 times.)
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My moniker is my great grandfather's name. He served with the 2nd Florida Mounted Regiment in the Civil War. Afterward, he came home, packed his wife into a wagon, and was one of the first NorteAmericanos on the Frio River southwest of San Antonio ..... Kinda where present day Dilley is ...

"Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyway." John Wayne
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Roscoe Coles
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« Reply #45 on: September 16, 2009, 10:18:13 am »

As nice as this holster and the transitional holster from River Junction are, I would stick with a plain slim jim for a pre-war Californio holster.   

A look at "Packing Iron" or a talk with Buck Stinson would be in order here, but looped holsters seem to be a postwar phenomena.  I'm thinking of getting a version of the early transitional holster (like the one from River Junction) for my Remington New Model Navy Conversion, it would make a good postwar set. 

By the way, why the interest in "spots?" Is this just something that you think is cool or do you have any information saying that gun leather with spots was common among Californios in 1860? 
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WaddWatsonEllis
Watt and Wadd Watson Ellis
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Howdy, Pardner! Sacramento, Ca here ....


« Reply #46 on: September 16, 2009, 10:34:03 am »

Roscoe,

I am not so much interested in 'spots'  ... they can be there or not.  But the holster was a sale item ... and I liked the floral work.

I also liked the high top that would have been indicative of protecting the caps on a cap and ball holster ....

But getting back to the spots, my belt will be tooled and I was looking for a tooled holster to match.... and the Califonia style slim jims that I have seen for sale are all plain and well, plain.

Any suggestions ... by the way, they were sold out of right hand holsters in the transitional one ... so that was a dead end.
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My moniker is my great grandfather's name. He served with the 2nd Florida Mounted Regiment in the Civil War. Afterward, he came home, packed his wife into a wagon, and was one of the first NorteAmericanos on the Frio River southwest of San Antonio ..... Kinda where present day Dilley is ...

"Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyway." John Wayne
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J.D. Yellowhammer
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Great-great-grandaddy Mack Cullars, 1864, CSA vet.


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« Reply #47 on: September 16, 2009, 11:17:27 am »

Am having a traditionally correct belt made for the Californio period ... and will tuck the pistol in the belt until I can afford to have a slim jim made.

I have one of the OK Leather's open top Western Slim Jims fer sale.
Here's their ad (halfway down the page)
https://www.oklahomaleatherproducts.com/Merchant4/merchant.mv?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=OLP&Category_Code=B1

Mine is right hand draw, unused. $20.00 shipped.
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Lunarian, n.  An inhabitant of the moon, as distinguished from Lunatic, one whom the moon inhabits. (Ambrose Bierce).  Which one are you?
WaddWatsonEllis
Watt and Wadd Watson Ellis
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Howdy, Pardner! Sacramento, Ca here ....


« Reply #48 on: September 16, 2009, 11:34:17 am »

J.D.,

I sent you a PM .....
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My moniker is my great grandfather's name. He served with the 2nd Florida Mounted Regiment in the Civil War. Afterward, he came home, packed his wife into a wagon, and was one of the first NorteAmericanos on the Frio River southwest of San Antonio ..... Kinda where present day Dilley is ...

"Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyway." John Wayne
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James Hunt
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« Reply #49 on: September 16, 2009, 11:35:30 am »

WaddWatsonEllis: You said "Kind of a shame not to compete with them ... maybe I might when I get to know a little more about 'The Dark Side"...."

There is so little to know and it is so much fun, I wouldn't wait to learn anything.

Complete shooting instructions.

1/ Pour in about 25 grains or thereabouts of BP (2f, 3f),
2/ push in a lubed wad ***
3/ push a ball down on top of wad and powder
4/ push on cap.
5/ Shoot

*** {if you are fearful of chain fire (and in this day and age it is probably the guy next to you that will sue you) and/or going to shoot multiple cylinders in a match add the procedure of placing a lubed wad (wonder wads or cheaper versions are readily available or make your own using someones felt hat left behind at the last match) over the powder before you shove the ball down}

Complete cleaning instruction.

1/ Take to kitchen sink and turn on hot water tap,
2/ take out cylinder and hose well under water (probably should take out nipples and clean separately if you have the time, (I dump mine in a little cap of 90% -OH),
3/ Shove several wet patches thru bore until clean,
4/ use wet patches or paper towel to clean around cylinder area of gun,
5/ dry everything with dry patch or paper towel
6/ use anything cheap that works with black powder to displace any remaining water and lube bore and rest of gun - this would be Type F transmission fluid, the wife's bottle of olive oil (extra virgin or absolutely slutty doesn't matter), or tallow (if absolutely determined you can buy some of those expensive alternatives), (by the way for the cylinder I simply keep a little container of olive oil and drop it in after cleaning for a few seconds and then wipe the outside dry - don't reuse this oil on your salad)
7/ put guns in safe and insert the DVD "Remuda" and relax.

Before shooting again wipe excess lube out of cylinder with a dry patch and use nipple pick.

There may be more offered by what I confess to calling the BP anal crowd, but I have yet to find it matters in any way when shooting a revolver. Black powder is great fun, easy on the gun, and barring flicking your cigar ashes into it, safer than using smokeless in cartridges, at least in my opinion.

By the way I also suggest Buck Stinson (Rick Bachman). He is a very helpful fella on the phone, I know he makes the very top end of leather, but if you have a question and keep it short, he can be a fount of information. If you are but a poor vaquero make your own from someone else's boot top (authentic) or stick it in a sash, probably just as good or better looking than an el cheapo commercial job.
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