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 91 
 on: August 31, 2014, 08:06:27 pm 
Started by Dick Dastardly - Last post by Capt. JEB Forrest
.44 S&W American, .44 S&W Russian, .45 Colt, .45 S&W  are allowed. .44 Special/.44 Magnum are allowed if loaded with black powder or loaded with heathen, fad, powder to black powder velocities.

'72 open tops are allowed as well as conversion cylinders by Kirst and R&D.

 92 
 on: August 31, 2014, 07:34:17 pm 
Started by GunClick Rick - Last post by Will Lynchem
Glad you did! Never could figure out how they were going to license or monitor all the ammo from all of us that reload anyway.  W.l. Grin

 93 
 on: August 31, 2014, 07:27:20 pm 
Started by JSpencerman - Last post by Herbert
That is the first time I have seen such a low Serial numbered Spencer carbine with goverment documentation ,are there any others

 94 
 on: August 31, 2014, 07:16:47 pm 
Started by buckskin billy - Last post by Cliff Fendley
Just received two spools of Barbours 5 cord left twist linen from Campbell.

 95 
 on: August 31, 2014, 06:49:36 pm 
Started by Rebel Yell - Last post by Rebel Yell
Are there year(s) of production that should be avoided in this revolver?  I hear warnings from various sources and know-it-alls who say guns, like the Uberti Cattleman produced prior to the new factory, should be avoided.  Is that the generally accepted opinion? 

Thanks   

 96 
 on: August 31, 2014, 06:41:26 pm 
Started by Slowhand53 - Last post by Crow Choker
Good Grief-the western TV shows proliferated the three networks back in the 50's and early 60's like all those worthless talent, reality, and game shows do now (don't watch even one of those). Some time back I typed in 'early western TV shows' or something to that effect and everyone that ever aired was there with a Wikipedia listing. Was fun to recall some of them that I forgot about and sat for several hours reading the take on a lot of them. As far as my favorite it was probably Matt Dillon and crew of Gunsmoke, but I tried never to miss Paladin or the Rifleman. Saturday nights was always to have our baths taken before Gunsmoke and Paladin came on, of course we had to suffer through the Lawrence Welk Show before hand. (Good grief-now I watch a little of Lawrence and the boys in the band on PBS once in a while.) Another one that still has a flashback from time to time is Jim Bowie. Still can reply the start of the show with the 'Big Bowie' knife being thrown into a wooden door and can recall the melody and words of the opening song. It wasn't a true 1800 era western, but Saturday mornings always had 'Fury' on when I was a wee one. So many, wish they still would still have a few on the tube, but of course they would have to be politically correct and would have to involve steamy sins that are culled from Sodom and Gomorrah. Enjoy buying DVD's of some of the 'oldies, but goodies', my kids and now even my grandkids sit and watch em', they enjoy them. Better for them than the offering available now.   

 97 
 on: August 31, 2014, 06:18:07 pm 
Started by Arcey - Last post by Major E A Sterner


Remember the fighter pilot who flew through the Eiffel Tower in 1944?

                                                                                   ... He's Gone...

In the spring of 1944 Bill and his P-51C, the 'Berlin Express' were near Paris when the scene that is immortalized in the artwork by Len Krenzler of Action Art that leads this article took place. Bill had followed this Bf109 from the bombers he was escorting when most of the German fighters left. The two planes had been in a running dogfight. The German pilot flew over Paris hoping that the heavy German anti-aircraft artillery would solve his problem and eliminate Overstreet and the 'Berlin Express', though Bill managed to get some hits in at about 1500 feet. The German's engine was hit, and Bill stayed on his tail braving the intense enemy flak. His desperation undoubtedly growing, the German pilot aimed his plane at the Eiffel Tower and in a surprising maneuver, flew beneath it. Undeterred, Bill followed right behind him, scoring several more hits in the process. The German plane crashed and Bill escaped the heavy flak around Paris by flying low and full throttle over the river until he had cleared the cities heavy anti-aircraft batteries.

WWII fighter pilot who flew THROUGH the Eiffel Tower to take down a German plane dies in Virginia aged 92

William Overstreet Jr., a former captain in the U.S. Air Corps, passed away on Sunday at a hospital in Roanoke.

He famously flew his plane beneath the Eiffel Tower in Nazi-occupied Paris in 1944, lifting the spirits of French troops on the ground

In 2009, he was presented France's Legion of Honor

William Overstreet Jr. died on Sunday at a hospital in Roanoke, Virginia, according to his obituary, but there was no indication

of the cause of his death.

Hero: World War II Aviator Bill Overstreet Jr., best known for flying beneath the Eiffel Tower in pursuit of a German plane, is pictured

in his military days. He passed away in Virginia on Sunday, aged 92

Before the ceremony, Overstreet had previously said that, if he lived long enough to receive the Legion of Honor, he would

be accepting it in memory of his fallen brothers.

In particular, he wanted to pay tribute to a friend, Eddy Simpson, who died fighting the Nazis on the ground so his comrades,

including Overstreet, could escape.

After the award was pinned to his lapel, Overstreet said: 'If I said, "Thank you," it wouldn't be enough,' before adding:

'What more than "thank you" do you need?'

He was born in Clifton Forge, Virginia in 1921 and after Pearl Harbor, he enlisted in the Air Corps as a fighter pilot.

By February 1942, he was a private and sent to California for flight training; here, his instructors prepared him for the unexpected

mid-flight by cutting the engine as he landed.

Remembered: Overstreet was presented with France's Legion of Honour in 2009

Aircraft: Overstreet is pictured by his P-51 'Berlin Express', the plane he flew beneath the Eiffel Tower

Proud: Overstreet is pictured in 1943 with his cherished 1938 Buick in California, where he trained

Close call: The wreckage of his Bell P-39 Airacobra which spun out of control mid-air as he completed combat

training in 1943. He managed to force his way out of the craft and walked away unhurt

Loss: Bill Overstreet is pictured at an event, Warbirds Over the Beach, in 2013.

'He was always humble. Whenever the press interviewed him, he said, "I didn't do anything, we were a team".'

RIP Bill Overstreet.

 
   

 



 98 
 on: August 31, 2014, 06:16:52 pm 
Started by David Battersby - Last post by Dick Dastardly
All primers "back out", but they are pushed back in when pressure builds and forces the brass back over the spent primer.  If your primers are still "backed out" when you eject the brass, the brass wasn't forced back over the spent primer.  More pressure should cure that.


DD-MDA

 99 
 on: August 31, 2014, 05:59:04 pm 
Started by kwalker - Last post by Blackfoot
Might be good to do a search on some of the gun auction, gun sales sites and see what they are selling for.  You will find starting bids, buy it now prices and actual bids.  I think the actual bid prices of sold guns may be a more realistic figure.

Blackfoot

 100 
 on: August 31, 2014, 05:50:09 pm 
Started by Major 2 - Last post by Don Nix
Slamfire. i sent you a pm. I sure need to holler at you about some boots.
Thanks

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