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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  CAS TOPICS  |  The Longbranch (Moderators: Marshal Halloway, Silver Creek Slim, Camille Eonich)  |  Topic: Snow ... and I mean snow! 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: Snow ... and I mean snow!  (Read 2747 times)
PJ Hardtack
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« on: February 10, 2018, 07:03:55 pm »


Some of you guys have to look it up on google to know what snow is. I look out my windows. It's been -35C the past few mornings, warming up to -12C, but bright and sunny with no wind. It's like living in a Christmas card.

After a pretty light winter so far this year, we got our usual snow dump over a period of two days. We now have about four feet of it on top of the two feet we already had.

My Shepherd/Husky and Shepherd/Rottweiler disappear in it. I just took them on a short snowshoe trek of about one kilometre and it was brutal on them. I was sinking about 6" wearing my wood and babiche snowshoes. They were plowing a trough! I'm usually waiting on the snowmobilers to make a x-country ski trail for me, but the deep snow is discouraging them. Wimps.

We've been plowing out neighbours driveways for days and even road graders are getting bogged and need help getting unstuck. I got stuck in my own driveway and had to prevail upon a neighbour with a big diesel pick up to haul me out. Another neighbour had to call upon a four wheel drive tractor and a pulley system to get himself unstuck.

In total I got stuck four times, necessitating a massive dig out to get rolling again. Finally, I got smart and put on my cable chains. Couldn't move the amount of snow without them.

Some guys learn the hard way ..... and I'm one of them. But - not to complain. We were getting concerned about the low snow level which meant another bad year for wildfires. I think we got that covered now.
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dusty texian
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« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2018, 07:14:40 pm »

Take care up there PJ , hopefully spring is around the corner . ,,,,DT
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Coffinmaker
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« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2018, 08:48:43 pm »


Sometimes, living a Currier and Ives post card ain't all it's cracked up to be.
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Forty Rod
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« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2018, 11:38:23 pm »

And folks wonder why I left northern Utah in 1965 and never moved back.
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Forty Rod
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« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2018, 11:40:20 pm »

Woopsie daisy.  Double tap.


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Shawnee McGrutt
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« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2018, 12:43:04 pm »

So you weren't tarred and feathered, and ran out of town on a rail? Shocked
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PJ Hardtack
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« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2018, 12:47:30 pm »

Spring? Whazzat?

We get nine months of winter and three months of tough sledding. During that brief interval, we have the mosquito season where you limit your outdoors activity and the moose, deer and horses stand in the open hoping for a breeze.

Then we long for winter. Balmy weather today - no wind and only -24C. I'll be breaking trail on snowshoes for the dogs today - after it warms up to -12C or so.


Take care up there PJ , hopefully spring is around the corner . ,,,,DT
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Forty Rod
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« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2018, 06:50:01 pm »

Spring? Whazzat?

We get nine months of winter and three months of tough sledding. During that brief interval, we have the mosquito season where you limit your outdoors activity and the moose, deer and horses stand in the open hoping for a breeze.

Then we long for winter. Balmy weather today - no wind and only -24C. I'll be breaking trail on snowshoes for the dogs today - after it warms up to -12C or so.



Dad used to say our northern Utah climate was ten months of winter and two months way late in the fall.  Sounds like someone in your neighborhood knew Dad.
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wildman1
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« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2018, 10:34:22 pm »

Weren't no snow in Prescott taday.  Tongue
wM1
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PJ Hardtack
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« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2018, 12:56:43 pm »

Been -35C/36C for the last couple of mornings. Warmed up yesterday to -12C so I went snowshoeing again. The dogs declined to accompany me, tired of ploughing thru' the snow.

I expect the same thing today, but I can't see all that sunshine and not want to be out in it. Besides, it's great aerobic exercise you desert rats never get to experience.
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Yeso Bill
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« Reply #10 on: February 13, 2018, 04:33:30 pm »

I live just North of the 34th Parallel in Se Central N.M.  The elevation is 5,000 ft. which usually means daily wind.  One time I have seen snow 3' on the level here but usually it is 2 or 3 10 - 14" snows from Dec - March....if that.  The only snow this winter was maybe an inch day before yesterday.  Dad said that this is far enough North to live and I tend to agree with him. 

Today is sunny, 68 degrees, 16 humidity and the wind is blowing just hard enough not to shoot the 44-40 at the chickens.....10 mph.  Pretty nice day. 

Billy
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PJ Hardtack
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« Reply #11 on: February 13, 2018, 08:59:57 pm »

We actually have a couple deserts north of the DMZ and a few semi-deserts as well. The latter means less than 20" of precipitation per year.

I lived in a semi-desert for 11 years and while the summers were hot and dry, we sure got a load of snow in the winter! We had the best x-country skiing trails in the country, over 50 kms of groomed track.
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Yeso Bill
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« Reply #12 on: February 13, 2018, 10:24:08 pm »

This is considered semi desert and is a grass country.  "They" say 12 - 14" per year but thats being pretty generous.    Grin

Billy
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kwilliams1876
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« Reply #13 on: February 14, 2018, 07:58:13 pm »

yeso Bill
 i laid over a night with my mule and many other trail riders at a ranch in Yeso years back, no snow there but it had plenty of rain as i remember. we all crossed the Pecos the next day by Ft. Sumner.
best
kw
montana territory.....big snow country
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Yeso Bill
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« Reply #14 on: February 16, 2018, 07:56:31 pm »

KW
    Were you on one of the Billy the Kid trail rides?  If so you crossed over us and possibly camped over at the Half Way Ranch.  Likely that was our last rain.   Grin  Seriously, It has drizzled here all day.  Maybe there is a 1/4" in the gauge and it is our first measureable moisture since October.

Billy
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kwilliams1876
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« Reply #15 on: February 17, 2018, 08:53:18 am »

Yeso Bill
Yes, it was the Billy the Kid ride, and we did lay over for a night on a ranch in Yeso. I was riding the only saddle mule. The ride and the "chuck" where one of the best times i ever had.
Now I am buried deep in snow here in Montana......can't even get out to the road!  my horses have not seen it this deep in a long time. Guess I need to buy a snow blower for the tractor, can not plow anymore.

best kw
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Yeso Bill
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« Reply #16 on: February 18, 2018, 06:31:36 am »

KW:
Well, More than likely we have met.  Seems I recall a man riding a mule.  Depending on which direction the Trail Boss decided to go that year, the route was usually start in Lincoln, Corn Ranch, Halfway Ranch, Overton's El Yeso Ranch, and then Ft. Sumner.  My family owns the Halfway and the trail riders would camp there in the bunk house one night.  We'd build a fire in the yard and I always enjoyed sitting around and drinking Wally's whiskey.  (the cook) 
 
     Supposedly, the Kid's escape route was the old Military Trail between Ft. Stanton and Ft. Sumner.  It is actually south of the Billy the Kid Trail Ride route and I've lived here all my life and have ridden over a lot of it but not all.
 
     A ride over the actual trail with a party of people would not be practical as there are only two ranch houses between Ft. Sumner and the Capitan Mnt. gap on or near the trail.  And there is a 45 mile stretch in the middle of it with no water...just like the old days.  And it has no gates on it. 

     The trail is shown on Map of the Military Department, 1864 but it is close but not quite accurate.  I saw another map at Ft. Garland dated 1896 showing the road where it belonged and still in use.

Well, we just got 8/10s of rain!  First moisture since October.  We had one of your snows in 96.  http://www.nytimes.com/1998/01/05/us/herds-thinned-by-rare-deep-snow-in-new-mexico.html   I think it was closer to 30" but who knows because we always get high winds after a snow storm.  Everybody swore that they were going to buy snow shoes and snow mobiles and be prepared for the next one but nobody did.   Grin

Billy     
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dusty texian
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« Reply #17 on: February 18, 2018, 07:51:44 am »

Spring? Whazzat?

We get nine months of winter and three months of tough sledding. During that brief interval, we have the mosquito season where you limit your outdoors activity and the moose, deer and horses stand in the open hoping for a breeze.

Then we long for winter. Balmy weather today - no wind and only -24C. I'll be breaking trail on snowshoes for the dogs today - after it warms up to -12C or so.


    Well glad you are enjoying your 9 months of snow  . And 2 or 3 months of whatever you call it . Thaw/ mud / bugs ! I was catfishing on the Llano river all wk. 39 in the morning 72 in the day , not bad for Mid - February . Critters are liking it too . ,,,DT
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PJ Hardtack
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« Reply #18 on: February 18, 2018, 01:46:30 pm »

We can't change it, so we have to learn how to enjoy it.

Scenically, it's like living in a Xmas card. And we see things most people will never see, like moose beds in the snow. For some reason, our resident cow moose and her current calf like to forage on this side of the lake this time of year. So far on my snowshoeing treks I've found three places where they have bedded for the night, one location not 50 yds from where I'm now sitting. I could have seen them from my office window had there been enough daylight.

They simply flop down where they are, sometimes in the open, other times near a tree well. The calf is always close by, but in it's own bed. It's usually the last place where they were feeding on willow twigs, the mainstay of their diet this time of year.

It's also interesting watching the dogs dig for field mice and voles they can hear moving under the snow. They don't catch many but it keeps them amused when they aren't chasing the squirrels that raid the bird feeders.
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dusty texian
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« Reply #19 on: February 18, 2018, 02:09:58 pm »

Sounds truly beautiful. I wonder how much willow twigs  a cow moose consumes a day ?  ,,,DT
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Yeso Bill
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« Reply #20 on: February 18, 2018, 03:32:50 pm »

Well, I'm certainly no moose man but if I recall my Feeds 'n Feeding class correctly, a cow needs 25lbs of dry fodder daily.  Since that isn't usually available on western winter ranges, cow cake was invented.  So, those Willow twigs must be made of pretty good stuff.

Seems like I read somewhere that the mountain men fed their horses willow bark?

It is trying to blow us away today.    

Billy

Later....  So I got to wondering and Moose are ruminants like cattle, sheep, goats, elk, buffalo and deer.
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PJ Hardtack
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« Reply #21 on: February 18, 2018, 06:30:47 pm »

One of the native names for moose is "Twig eater". Some of the browsing I've seen is on 1/2" stems.

The poplars here are often scarred quite high up by moose feeding on bark during the winter when nothing else is available. One year a tall poplar came down and over the winter, the cow and her calf completely stripped it of bark.

We see them putting their heads under water all the time, feeding on the roots of aquatic plants, like bull rushes and reeds.

I have watched the cow walk into deep water an completely disappear, not even a ripple on the water and not surface again for well over 25yds! If anyone had told me moose could do this, I would not have believed it.

We are disallowed removing willows from the riparian zone (lake shore) by the 'lake police' (Fisheries & Oceans and Forestry) for the sake of the beavers and moose. We all gotta get along if we are going to survive, and they were here first.
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I don't do these things to others and I require the same from them."  John Wayne
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« Reply #22 on: February 19, 2018, 12:17:41 am »

One of the native names for moose is "Twig eater". Some of the browsing I've seen is on 1/2" stems.

The poplars here are often scarred quite high up by moose feeding on bark during the winter when nothing else is available. One year a tall poplar came down and over the winter, the cow and her calf completely stripped it of bark.

We see them putting their heads under water all the time, feeding on the roots of aquatic plants, like bull rushes and reeds.

I have watched the cow walk into deep water an completely disappear, not even a ripple on the water and not surface again for well over 25yds! If anyone had told me moose could do this, I would not have believed it.

We are disallowed removing willows from the riparian zone (lake shore) by the 'lake police' (Fisheries & Oceans and Forestry) for the sake of the beavers and moose. We all gotta get along if we are going to survive, and they were here first.

PJ
Protect the willows hey!    come downunder and they declared a noxious weed - I kid you not! - Some idjit in an office decided they "damage the riparian zone" whatever the hell that means - so we have seen millions of taxpayer dollars deployed cutting, bulldozing, burning, poisoning --- thousands of miles of beautiful willow lined creeks have been decimated - oh yeah they have a story and a whole bunch of "research" that proves willows destroy the environment ......Funny thing is this all started after someone did a study on how much water a willow takes up frrom the soil - and I believe the man from the govmint decided if they stopped the willows using that water - it would run on down the creek and they could sell it to a downstream cotton farmer . grrrrrrr. 
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Buffalo Creek Law Dog
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« Reply #23 on: February 19, 2018, 09:49:25 am »

This is the most snow that we have had in about 10 years. Only one Chinook came through and it was a short one. The temperature has been below normal for most of the winter so far.

This is the year Leonardo DiCaprio should have filmed the movie, The Revenant, up here instead of 2015 when we had several Chinooks blow through with hardly any snow.  He went on and on about global warming because they had to relocate to South America for some of the snow scenes.

The president of our muzzleloading club was one of the technical advisors on that movie.  He had to teach the actors how to load a muzzleloader so they looked like they knew what they were doing.  He also had to teach DiCaprio how to start a fire with flint and steel.
We are approximately 80 miles as the crow flies from where most of the Revenant was filmed.

The forecast for here is still cold with no Chinook in sight.  They say that there is a lot of snow on the eastern slopes of the Rockies this winter, which means that the Old Man River will probably threaten Lethbridge and Medicine Hat with flooding again in the spring.
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PJ Hardtack
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« Reply #24 on: February 19, 2018, 12:00:55 pm »

Bright, sunny day, no wind - but -36C.  It's -40 where Fahrenheit and Celsius meet. Only been that cold a few times over the last decade.

I often wonder how the little birds survive these temps. It is my pleasure to feed them sunflower oil seeds. They also like some types of dog kibble.

Time to bundle up and take the dogs for their morning walk.
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"I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, I won't be laid a hand on.
I don't do these things to others and I require the same from them."  John Wayne
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