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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  GENERAL TOPICS  |  Tall Tales (Moderator: Silver Creek Slim)  |  Topic: You think you’d like to be a Farrier? 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: You think you’d like to be a Farrier?  (Read 247 times)
litl rooster
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I ain't sold my saddle


« on: January 26, 2018, 10:42:15 am »


So you think you can shoe horses or even want to own one.  I am sharing this story, not my own. It was shared by SIL  to my wife. From their FB pages. Being a former keeper of the equine and have had to fumble with the feet of each( will never say i was a farrier). I can attest this is a accurate story of evil critter.


Eagle Ridge Farrier Service
Burlington VT

I was at the university a few days ago working of a draft horse who came out of sedition just long enough to kick me through a stall door. So, I'm taking today off to both feel sorry for myself and to draft out my experiences as a moving target. 

Horse kicks 101:
Even when you work on very well trained and gentle horses, getting kicked is somewhat of a occupational hazard as a farrier. Sometimes it's out of fear or pain, sometimes it by mistake, and on occasion even good horses have bad days. Whatever the reason, the resulting world of hurt for us comparatively soft and squishy monkeys is the same. However, just how badly one is injured can depend a lot on the conviction and breed of the offending (or offended) critter.

The breed voted most likely to knock you across the aisle way in high school would be the American Thoroughbred. Like most things in Europe the European thorough bread seem to have a more level head about them. Much like myself, the American TB (especially the on track race horse) is a rather high strung critter who's environment has made them prone to both panicked flight and  personal injury. When they kick it's powerful, wildly unpredictable, but accurate, and always followed by the snapping of the cross ties as they gallop to perceived safety screaming "I'm a racehorse! I am a racehorse!" as they disappear down the driveway.

Next on the list of crazies is the Arabian horse, especially the Egyptians. It's my theory that they're small dished heads compress their brains, making them prone hallucinations. The larger the dish, the more likely they are to mistake a blowing leaf for a horse eating dragon. When they kick it's completely unpredictable, light, but deadly fast. The Arab will also gallop to safety, but that's likely 50 or more miles away. Also, one should be aware that when the leaf monster presents itself the Arabian has the ability to to teleport its way to safety.

The American quarter horse is the  lab of the equine industry. They are cool tempered and unexcitable. Snakes, rogue cows, or even that mounted migrant worker commonly known as a cowboy shooting off their backs rarely gets them to raise more than an eyebrow. If you do managed to get kicked by one of these guys you (or someone they felt very strongly about) like deserved it. Unlike Arabs or TBs, when they kick something they meant to do it. While they might not be as fast as they're caffeinated cousins their blows come down with the accuracy and might of Thor's hammer. They always accompany their mighty blows with a inquisitive yet judgmental expression to suggest "did you learn something today?"

Draft horses are best described as gentle giants. They are kind, forgiving, and dumb as a box of rocks. If you are unlucky enough to be walloped by one of these tanks it's likely because they forgot you were there. What the draft horse lacks in conviction they make up for in brute force. Accuracy and speed doesn't really matter that much when dropping nuclear warheads.

Ponies... I am convinced the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse will be charging in on the burning fury of pony hooves. It really doesn't matter what you did or didn't do, ponies will kick simply because they can. They are a weapon of equal opportunity.  What they lack in brute force they make up for in quantity. So much quantity...

Donkeys/mules are not horses, and they will be sure to remind you of that fact should you forget. They are even tempered, but unforgiving. It doesn't take a very big donkey to carry a grudge. When they feel you are deserving of capital punishment they have no qualms about dishing out. They are the ninja snipers of the equine world. One shot, one kill is the donkey's motto. If one of Hell's own minions fires a shot at you and misses it was only a warning. When they strike there hooves rip the very fabric of time and space to arrive faster than the speed of light.

Please understand that not every Arabian is crazy and not every draft horse is dumb. These are lighthearted stereotypes that come from my personal observations and experiences gathered over my 12 years standing behind the anvil. I know they will not be true of every horse.

Carry on.
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Joshua 1.9


litl rooster
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I ain't sold my saddle


« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2018, 10:43:26 am »

I do dispute the last paragraph
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"the ringin' of my jinglebobs is music to my soul.

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dusty texian
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Dusty Texian


« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2018, 11:05:22 am »

Nope ! My Dad was for 40 something yrs. Like I said Nope ! ,,,DT
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Major 2
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« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2018, 01:39:28 pm »

Did my share for 30 some years , as an owner I was kicked a few times....

made the mistake to walk up on my  dosing Morgan  mare on a cavalry picket line....A gentle open hand tap on her upper flank ...netted me a solid hit left rear hoof to my upper thigh...3" to left and I be a soprano .... Shocked

Feeding along a 25 horse picket line once @ Jefferson Barracks Mo. ....a frenzy ensued among the Mounts next in line to receive their grain ...I got nailed RIGHT square in the Rectum sphincter..... BOOM !  I saw stars and tasted S#it.

Side kicks are glancing blows If your lucky ....if not your pooched .....

Would not trade the memories though ....

I concur about American TB & Arab's strung high   


But the dumbest is the Appaloosa.... Only horse slow enough & dumb enough to be caught on foot !   

     
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Scattered Thumbs
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« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2018, 02:24:43 pm »

You folks made me laugh out loud. And confirmed my resolve not to be a farrier in this lifetime. Grin

My thanks to you.
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dusty texian
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Dusty Texian


« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2018, 02:36:19 pm »

Dang Major 2 the injuries you described bring back memories , I think my left hip is deformed from being lifted off the ground more than once . Tasted S###+T Dang that's hit hard ! ,,,DT
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litl rooster
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I ain't sold my saddle


« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2018, 06:04:20 pm »

Did my share for 30 some years , as an owner I was kicked a few times....


Would not trade the memories though ....

I concur about American TB & Arab's strung high   


But the dumbest is the Appaloosa.... Only horse slow enough & dumb enough to be caught on foot ! 

That is why the Native Indians rode them...they got their spots fro m being poked with tee pee poles trying to make them go faaster

     
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Baltimore Ed
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« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2018, 06:22:50 pm »

She didn't say no, she said hell no! I don't even like messing with my car.
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Silver Creek Slim
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« Reply #8 on: January 26, 2018, 08:37:33 pm »

That is great.

I would say Standardbreds are a combination of TB and Quarter horse.

Owned horses for 6 years. Been stepped on numerous times. Haven't been kicked, yet.

Slim
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« Reply #9 on: January 26, 2018, 09:44:31 pm »

That is great.

I would say Standardbreds are a combination of TB and Quarter horse.

Owned horses for 6 years. Been stepped on numerous times. Haven't been kicked, yet.

Slim

Like California Earthquakes ....  "  IT’S NOT IF, BUT WHEN "

I owned  Morgans , Quarters, Standard Bred, Tenn. Walkers,  Arabs & TB's

Once upon a Time in my 35 years of reenacting .... Still have a Cracker Horse .... and 5 buried in the back pasture  Cry


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Silver Creek Slim
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« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2018, 09:52:13 pm »

My TN Walker mare is at least 26 years old. The Standarbred gelding is 20 years old. We had two other Standardbreds but they were sent to the Amish when the gelding came to live with us. The gelding is my uncle's horse, and my grandfather's before that.

Slim
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I love the smell of Black Powder in the morning!
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Cracker Cow Cavalry


« Reply #11 on: January 27, 2018, 05:22:48 am »

The Morgan was 28 when I had to put her down , arthritis so bad in her front quarters , she could not stand  Cry
I lost my Quarter horse to heat stroke at 28, my daughters little Arab twisted a gut and passed at 20.
Freak occurrence with my Walker...he and the Cracker Cow horse were just messing about , the Cracker struck out and nailed the Walker
(Kick)  just behind his skull ....basil skull fracture ....dead before he hit the ground ....
2 minute earlier they were just playing around ....freak accident  Cry he was just 11 ...
My Daughter's Cracker horse was really not to blame ( just 2 yrs old at the time )
We sill have him , now 13 ....but , Pretty much took the wind out of my sails though,  I ride in my memories now.

The Morgan and the Walker were gated ....smoothest ride ever, the Quarter Horse was by far the fleetest.   

 
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