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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  CAS TOPICS  |  Shooter's Meeting (Moderators: Marshal Halloway, Camille Eonich)  |  Topic: How similar is a 1904 vintage 1894 Marlin to a modern one? 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: How similar is a 1904 vintage 1894 Marlin to a modern one?  (Read 380 times)
Baltimore Ed
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« on: January 16, 2018, 07:13:53 am »


I'm looking at an old .44-40 Marlin 1894 that supposedly was made in 1904. It has been nicely reblued at some point. I'm wondering how different is this one compared to the modern ones we use. The butt is ok but the forarm is cracked. Do modern parts work in these old guns?
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Bibbyman
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« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2018, 08:25:14 am »

I'm looking at an old .44-40 Marlin 1894 that supposedly was made in 1904. It has been nicely reblued at some point. I'm wondering how different is this one compared to the modern ones we use. The butt is ok but the forarm is cracked. Do modern parts work in these old guns?

Having several from that era, and several new production "pre-safey" and more than several post safety JM Marlin 1894s, I can say the oldest ones were of better quality all the way around.  The trick is to find one that age and abuse hasn't taken it's toll.  

The old, first model were built right. One piece trigger, steel follower, and no crossbolt safety.  All these features are now custom upgrades to the new production 1894s.

Many of the new product parts will work with the old rifles. But there are several parts that are unique to the old guns that new gun parts won't work.   The most significant is the ejector and extractor on the new models are different than the old models and won't work. To make matters worse,  the original ejectors and extractors are nearly impossible to find. And if the seller knows what they have, they ask high prices. Also,  the carriers are different.   I don't know if a new design will work in the old guns.  The loading port cover won't swap.

The 1894 in my picture is of the early production.  It was a project gun.  I bought it with a number of minor parts missing and one major part - the bolt.  I fitted a bolt from parts available for a modern production gun.  I had to make some modifications to it to get it to work.


* Marlin 1894 project gun Jan 2018.jpg (214.17 KB, 800x436 - viewed 20 times.)
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Sir Charles deMouton-Black
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NCOWS
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« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2018, 11:25:54 am »

My first CAS rifle was an 1889 Marlin in .44-40. Nice gun, but suffered from The Marlin Jam. I traded it back for a Browning 92 BLR in .44RM. Still have that on, or technically,  my son does.
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Baltimore Ed
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« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2018, 03:30:15 pm »

I've successfully repaired two Marlin jams, on my .45 and a friends .38, but I'd be concerned about case ejection/ extraction issues on the 1904. Depending on the sellers return policy and eventual $ we'll see what happens. I'm looking for a round bbled (24-28 inch) rifle not a carbine. if anyone in CasCity knows where I can get a 24+ inch round .44-.45 bbl to swap with my Marlin carbine .45 bbl I'd appreciate the heads up.
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Coffinmaker
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« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2018, 01:35:27 pm »

Balto,

The cracked Forearm should be a simple fix (Glass Bedding Compound).  If you get 3 days or a week inspection and return, I'd go for it.  The dreaded Marlin Jam is fixed with replacement parts.  That's a little weld and file job.  If the Bore is good you may well be onto a real nice fun rifle.  I'd probably go for it anyway but I'm a couple bubbles off center to start with.
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Baltimore Ed
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« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2018, 03:45:11 pm »

Coffinmaker, Even though I've got too many projects on the front and back burners, in the oven and spinning in the microwave my mind is still full of others. One of which is a Marlin 1893/94 musket in keeping with my current muskety, musketish or would it be musketry interests. So I'm either looking for a 24-28 inch round replacement bbl for my wifes modern .45 lc Marlin carbine or a whole older donor gun that has a longer round bbl, of course it would have to be a reblue or in rough shape as I wouldn't mess with a collectable. I do have some scruples.
Some women find guys that they think they can 'fix', we buy firearms that we think we can fix. I'm sure there's some clinical name for this ailment. Can'tleavewellenoughaloneitis or wonderwhathappensifichangethisopothy. The seller says that he usually doesn't do returns and that while he's not fired the gun he has cycled rds through it with no issues. I haven't made up my mind to jump yet.
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Bibbyman
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« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2018, 05:19:29 pm »

Here is what the Marlin 1894 project gun looked like when I brought it home.  Receiver,  buttstock, hammer, carrier, lever, trigger, barrel and a few other small parts.  Major parts missing were the bolt, loading gate, most screws (screws that were in it were wrong) magazine tool, spring follower, band, forend and cap. Some parts I had,  some parts I bought, and a few I just made. Lots of work to get it complete and actually working.  Worth the effort and cost? No.  But it's the journey that made it worth it. 


* Marlin 1894 project gun 2 Jan 2018.jpg (312.38 KB, 800x450 - viewed 14 times.)
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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  CAS TOPICS  |  Shooter's Meeting (Moderators: Marshal Halloway, Camille Eonich)  |  Topic: How similar is a 1904 vintage 1894 Marlin to a modern one? « previous next »
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