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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  Special Interests - Groups & Societies  |  STORM (Moderators: RRio, Major 2)  |  Topic: 60 Army LCC - but how did they "weld" the cylinders? 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: 60 Army LCC - but how did they "weld" the cylinders?  (Read 908 times)
tommy4toes
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« on: August 01, 2017, 09:25:02 pm »


Hi all. I'm researching a new project to build a pair of 1860 Army LCC revolvers.
Some of the original examples have two piece cylinders, others one piece.
My question is this - how was welding the cylinder halves accomplished in the 1860s? Hammer/forge or silver solder?
Electric arc welding wasn't perfected until the 1880s or later
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Tuolumne Lawman
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« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2017, 02:15:47 pm »

I think if you supply more information, someone may help/  1860s had 1 piece cylinders.  For most conversions, the rear was milled off, and a breech ring installed.  The only two piece conversion cylinders back then that I know of, were much like current R&D conversion cylinders, where the back came off to load the cylinder.  Remington did a lot of two piece conversions.  I also read (I think in McDowell's book) that Springfield Armory tried some 5 shot, two piece (R&D style) conversion cylinders for the 1860 that were for .45 Colt.
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TUOLUMNE LAWMAN
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Pettifogger
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« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2017, 12:31:48 am »

Colt never welded cylinders together.  The step in the 1860 cylinder was part of the design to fit a .44 caliber cylinder to the Navy .36 caliber frame.
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nativeshooter
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« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2017, 05:55:09 am »

https://www.gunsamerica.com/blog/cowboy-time-machine-mysterious-1860-army-cartridge-conversions/

Heres an article about conversions, it also brings up lcc ones too
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45 Dragoon
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« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2017, 10:46:09 am »

I believe they were soldered together (originals).
 The step in the Army frame was taken all the way to the breach so a non rebated cyl of full length could be installed. There is one pictured in one of  Adler's books. Of course today a one piece cylinder would be the way to go.

Mike
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Tuolumne Lawman
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« Reply #5 on: August 05, 2017, 01:12:53 pm »

I handled one original Long Cylinder Conversion, and the cylinder appeared to be one piece.
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TUOLUMNE LAWMAN
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« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2017, 02:43:13 pm »

I'm sure a complete cylinder would have been preferred back then and no doubt one or some were.  I've pretty much decided that whatever one thinks is "new" or would be "cool", has already been done at least once.  Even the " one offs" are good food for thought.

Mike
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Professor Marvel
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« Reply #7 on: August 07, 2017, 08:23:04 pm »

Hi all. I'm researching a new project to build a pair of 1860 Army LCC revolvers.
Some of the original examples have two piece cylinders, others one piece.
My question is this - how was welding the cylinder halves accomplished in the 1860s? Hammer/forge or silver solder?
Electric arc welding wasn't perfected until the 1880s or later

There are some historic examples of cylinders that had the back turned off and a new piece silver soldered or brazed on.
That piece was then drilled and the cylinder was reamed for the cartridge.

I do not beieve that the Colt factory ever did this, but rather it was done "in the field" by skilled local gunsmiths with the requisite equipment. In an online article, the author specifically wrote "welded" but I beleive he "mispoke" so to speak. The only welding method avaialbe at the time was hammer/forge welding and that would deform the parts too much in the process to be worth doing.

yhs
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Coffinmaker
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« Reply #8 on: August 08, 2017, 11:32:15 am »

Were I in search of a set of guns that resembled the "Long Cylinder Conversions" I'd opt for a pair of "Man With No Name" conversions from Uberti.

Some year back, Robert Millington built some long cylinder conversions.  You'd need a bank loan to buy one though.
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RebHolister
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« Reply #9 on: August 08, 2017, 09:27:57 pm »

The 'plain Jane' long cylinder in the picture below Adler's engraved and plated one - is mine.  It's a real tack driver with heel based bullets.  I know Millington built 3 of them.  Mine was the first one, then Adler's, and one for himself.  I believe he sent a cylinder and back plate to Long John Wolf in Germany.  He may have made one more, but that was it.
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Long Johns Wolf
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« Reply #10 on: August 09, 2017, 02:20:08 am »

Adler's pics but particularly McDowell's book inspired me to walk the LCC path.
Bob Millington did great work but was not involved in the Centaures converted to LCCs over here in Germany.
Currenty 6 such LCCs are documented.
They are the work of master gunsmith Klaus Mumme from Pirmasens/Germany.
Base guns were either 5,5" barrel Centaure Marshals or 8" barrel Centaure Regular New Model Armies.
They all have lined barrels to shoot inside lubed ammo in .44 Colt cal. (5) or .38 Special (1).
All are rebust, no nonsense pistols and regularly used in CAS matches.
Long Johns Wolf


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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  Special Interests - Groups & Societies  |  STORM (Moderators: RRio, Major 2)  |  Topic: 60 Army LCC - but how did they "weld" the cylinders? « previous next »
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