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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  Special Interests - Groups & Societies  |  Shotguns  |  Topic: 1000 ways to polish a chamber? 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: 1000 ways to polish a chamber?  (Read 4745 times)
McCrower
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« on: November 06, 2016, 09:40:52 am »


I am waiting for a new Boito s/s Coach Gun and preparing myself for some tuning. I have searched the internet for ways to polish the chamber for easy ejecting of the empty shell, and there are so many suggestions.

Anyone in this forum who knows a good method that works, and can be done at home?



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Major 2
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« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2016, 12:25:01 pm »

get 4  12 gauge bore mops , with a variable speed cordless drill motor use fine polishing compound , not to fast 
use 2 per chamber use an in and out movement.

I like Polishing Compounds in Fine and Finish -  Meguiar's  or Semi Chrome
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Coffinmaker
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« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2016, 07:40:51 pm »

First a Caveat.  Under NO circumstances even consider any kind of "Brake cylinder Hone" or any other "hone" that utilizes stones.  It's the fastest way I know to ruin shotgun chambers.

Major 2's suggestion is first rate.  This does not have to be "instant" nor particularly fast.  Take your time.

Next suggestion.  12Ga Brass Bore Brush.  Wrap the bore brush with 0000 Steel Wool.  A little oil in the chamber.  Fit the brush with the steel wool in the chamber and run it with a drill motor on SLOW, running it evenly in and out.  This may take several applications.

Second Caveat.  First, be sure the chambers need polished.  Often, the problem with hulls coming out of the chambers is the specific ammunition you are trying to use.

Coffinmaker

PS:  Shotguns are fickle.  You may have to try several different ammunitions makers to find the "right" hulls.
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hp246
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« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2016, 11:20:00 pm »

More expensive than the above options, but flex hones are available from Brownells.  They work very well.
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McCrower
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« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2016, 04:13:14 am »

Thanks guys. What about polishing other parts on the shotgun, what to use?
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wildman1
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« Reply #5 on: November 07, 2016, 05:28:58 am »

Clean all of the surfaces that fit together. Coat them with magic marker. Put them together and open and close the shotgun a few times. Then using 600 to 800 grit finishing cloth lightly buff the areas that show contact.  Put it back together and try it. Repeat the process if needed. wM1
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hp246
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« Reply #6 on: November 07, 2016, 08:08:46 pm »

I use a variety of round and cone shaped polishing pads in a cordless drill on slow speed, using only liquid polishing compound.  I also use crocus cloth to polish flats using a paint stick as a backer.  I've also made my own flap disc using a wooden dowel with a slot cut in it and crocus cloth.
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McCrower
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« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2016, 02:24:34 pm »

What about this one?
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Professor Marvel
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« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2016, 07:51:31 pm »

What about this one?


DREMEL??

My Dear McCrower, the handheld Dremel is the fastest way to bugger up metal known to man.

"Go Slow" and "Drremel" are almost completely incompatible.

yhs
prof mumbles
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Major 2
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« Reply #9 on: November 09, 2016, 01:42:54 am »

listen to the Prof

don't use a "Dremel" anywhere on a Gun  "PERIOD"
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McCrower
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« Reply #10 on: November 09, 2016, 01:51:44 am »

Good to know.

You should tell this guy about that:
https://youtu.be/FrtBEi1csOA?t=477
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Coffinmaker
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« Reply #11 on: November 09, 2016, 11:33:58 am »

Notice ...... The label on the Dremel polishing wheel says "Abrasive" Buffs.  An abrasive buffer WILL remove metal.  One must be hugely careful when "polishing" to ensure you are just "polishing."

Coffinmaker
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Coffinmaker
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« Reply #12 on: November 10, 2016, 12:31:21 pm »

Oh, you've gotta love it.  ABSOLUTELY HAVE TO LOVE IT.
Went and watched the referenced YouTube, done by the most gifted and skilled kitchen table expert >> Expert - Noun > Ex as a has been and Spurt - a drip under pressure.

After his careful and "expert" ministrations, that shotgun is actually worn out.  Wobbles at the hinges.  Then ..... Then ..... THEN >>>> following his careful, expert and cheap chamber honing job, the hulls wouldn't extract.  WONDERFUL!!

I almost croaked laughing so hard.  Just a shame he managed to ruin a perfectly good shotgun.  What a Putz.

Coffinmaker

PS:  Before I retired, if a customer admitted to owning a Dremel, I doubled the repair estimate without even looking at the gun.  Shocked Grin
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Whiskey Hayes
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« Reply #13 on: November 10, 2016, 03:57:28 pm »

McCrower

I have polished a lot of shotgun chambers using many different methods.  A Dremel tool has many uses and can be used for a lot of things.  A variable speed with the flex cable is the best set at the slowest speed but you have to be careful with the particular wheels etc you choose to use.  I have used the wheel you show and it's not a good chamber polishing wheel.  The in and out motion required to polish the entire length of the chamber and the amount of metal this wheel will remove can really mess up a chamber.

A full length bore mop, brass brush or Brownell's hone is the best to use.  The reason to use a full length tool is to ensure the chamber is polished the same full length. Using a full length tool you don't have to go in and out.  Just have it barely turning as tool goes in then increase speed when fully inserted.  Time how long you polish the chamber and maintain a constant drill RPM.  30 seconds is a good starting point.  A variable speed drill with two speed settings is the best  I have a drill with a max speed of 400 rpm.  Have your hand on chamber being polished.  When the steel is getting warm to the touch it's time to stop.  I finally broke down and bought the Brownell hone.  It is the best method I have used for chamber polishing.

If you want to polish other contact points as shown in the video a Dremel will work fine but use the cloth polishing wheels.  I actually prefer a scotchbrite pad and my finger for the curved areas.  The flat areas you can use a file wrapped with scotchbrite pad or a stone.  I prefer the stone.

Remember the wrong polishing wheel etc and speed will mess up a gun faster than you can say !*$!!#!.  This is why a Dremel isn't the best choice.

The best advise you have received is shoot the gun and discover what work it actually needs.  Plus use good smooth sided NOT ribbed shotgun shells.

Whiskey
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Coffinmaker
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« Reply #14 on: November 10, 2016, 07:42:09 pm »

If you elect to use the Brownells Chamber Hone (They are VERY Good) also buy the Honing Oil to go with it.

Coffinmaker
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McCrower
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« Reply #15 on: November 11, 2016, 02:21:40 am »

McCrower

I have polished a lot of shotgun chambers using many different methods.  A Dremel tool has many uses and can be used for a lot of things.  A variable speed with the flex cable is the best set at the slowest speed but you have to be careful with the particular wheels etc you choose to use.  I have used the wheel you show and it's not a good chamber polishing wheel.  The in and out motion required to polish the entire length of the chamber and the amount of metal this wheel will remove can really mess up a chamber.

A full length bore mop, brass brush or Brownell's hone is the best to use.  The reason to use a full length tool is to ensure the chamber is polished the same full length. Using a full length tool you don't have to go in and out.  Just have it barely turning as tool goes in then increase speed when fully inserted.  Time how long you polish the chamber and maintain a constant drill RPM.  30 seconds is a good starting point.  A variable speed drill with two speed settings is the best  I have a drill with a max speed of 400 rpm.  Have your hand on chamber being polished.  When the steel is getting warm to the touch it's time to stop.  I finally broke down and bought the Brownell hone.  It is the best method I have used for chamber polishing.

If you want to polish other contact points as shown in the video a Dremel will work fine but use the cloth polishing wheels.  I actually prefer a scotchbrite pad and my finger for the curved areas.  The flat areas you can use a file wrapped with scotchbrite pad or a stone.  I prefer the stone.

Remember the wrong polishing wheel etc and speed will mess up a gun faster than you can say !*$!!#!.  This is why a Dremel isn't the best choice.

The best advise you have received is shoot the gun and discover what work it actually needs.  Plus use good smooth sided NOT ribbed shotgun shells.

Whiskey

What kind of grit size on the scotchbrite pad do you use to polish?
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rickk
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« Reply #16 on: November 14, 2016, 10:19:35 am »

+1 for the Brownell's chamber hone set (and hone oil).

Not cheap, but works good and lasts for many guns.

Rick
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Tornado
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« Reply #17 on: November 15, 2016, 08:47:35 am »

+1 for the Brownell's chamber hone set (and hone oil).

Not cheap, but works good and lasts for many guns.

Rick


+2, I got one and used it on my Chinese 1878 Colt.  It shucks shells so well, it looks like it has an ejector.
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Whiskey Hayes
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« Reply #18 on: November 15, 2016, 10:02:22 am »

I'm not sure of what grit the Scotch Brite pads are.  I buy them at Kroger's.  They don't remove a lot of metal but do a fine job of polishing.  If you don't get heavy handed they are good for cleaning a teflon coated frying pan.
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Trader Dan
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« Reply #19 on: December 26, 2016, 10:46:49 pm »

Anybody here belong to the Wile E. Coyote school of gunsmithing other than me?

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Hargrave
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« Reply #20 on: January 09, 2017, 11:16:29 am »

Tornado ....

I have one of those Chinese 1878's coming soon for myself .... did you use the 800 Grit only or did you start with rougher and work your way up?

Just wondering as I am looking to do some polishing myself after I receive and take to the range for a test.

I also hear that putting a little time to buffing out the barrel lock lugs will help the gun open and close easier too.

Thanks,
Jake
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"Prairie Smoke" Jake
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In matters of principle, stand like a rock.
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Hargrave
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« Reply #21 on: January 09, 2017, 08:52:32 pm »

One more question ....

When polishing the chambers ... what do you do about the barrel throat? Is that an issue ?

Thanks
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"Prairie Smoke" Jake
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In matters of style, swim with the current;
In matters of principle, stand like a rock.
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