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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  Special Interests - Groups & Societies  |  The Cutting Edge (Moderator: St. George)  |  Topic: Russel Green River Knife Kit Project 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: Russel Green River Knife Kit Project  (Read 14151 times)
Slickshot
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« on: March 20, 2016, 02:06:07 am »


Hello,

This is my first "ever" attempt at building a knife.  I bought the kit "Dandy" knife kit off of "Track of the Wolf.com" and was pretty reasonable in price.

The original kit came with the blade, rivets, and Walnut Scales.  I purchased a book for an additional $7.95.

I hate to admit it, but I messed up the first set of scales on my first attempt at putting the knife together.  The directions told me to clamp the Scales together, drilling the holes thru at the same time.  This didn't work.  I found it better to drill them one scale at a time.  Clamping is necessary!!! Trust me please!

Needless to say. I ordered two sets of new scales, as I wasn't very confident, I wouldn't need both sets to complete my project.  So I ordered a bag of 50 Brass rivets, and a set of Mesquite, and a set of Birdseye Maple scales.

In the time between the order and receiving them.  I'd done some research on Curly Maple and techniques of getting the grain to "POP".  So I decided to try those techniques on my Birdseye Maple scales.

There were two techniques that seemed to work.  One. Was to purchase Aqua Fortis and coat the scales in that a few times, heating the scales over heat to get the grain to pop out.  TWO... was to use Vinegaroon to do the same thing.  I had an ample supply of vinegaroon on on hand for leather work, so I saved my money and did the second option.

I didn't like the shininess of the blade so I coated it with vinegaroon twice, letting the blade dry between coats, and then steel wooling the corrosion off the blade.  I then dalloped Apple Cider Vinegar on the blade in areas, letting each side dry, then repeating the steel wool process.

Here is what I have for my efforts, without the handle being completed with a number of coats of Boiled Linseed oil.

Please let me know what you think, and give me any pointers for improvement you might have.


* First Coat of Light Brown leather Oil Stain.jpg (86.64 KB, 640x360 - viewed 323 times.)

* Dandy Knife1.jpg (104.24 KB, 640x360 - viewed 311 times.)

* Dandy Knife2.jpg (104.48 KB, 640x360 - viewed 332 times.)
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Slickshot
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« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2016, 05:38:04 am »

Is my post a bad post?  I've not gotten one response.  Around seventy views, but no responses.

I am sorry if I offended anyone by posting this.  I was trying to learn, and get pointers.  I have another Green River Knife Blade in my possession to try to make look good.  This time I have Mesquite Handle Blanks to work with.

Thank you,

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Mogorilla
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« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2016, 09:09:03 am »

That is a dandy looking knife.  The scales are excellent. Totally agree on the method for drilling.  I do one at a time too then finish sanding/shaping after.

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« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2016, 12:54:57 am »

Thank you.

I've since bought another Russel Green River, but this time I got the Camper Knife, I think that's what it's called.  Sharp as a get out, can shave my arm with it.

I will put Mesquite scales on it.

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Will Ketchum
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« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2016, 08:36:21 am »

The Green River knives are probably the most authentic blades for most of the fur and cowboy era. They were easy to come by and were capable of handling almost any job.
You did a fine job on yours.

Will Ketchum
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« Reply #5 on: April 01, 2016, 10:36:11 am »

I have some mesquite and a green river blank at home.   I see a project coming.

Make sure to show your next one!
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Jake C
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« Reply #6 on: April 01, 2016, 11:05:44 am »

Looks good to me! Certainly better than anything I could make. Good job, pard.  Grin
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Cliff Fendley
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« Reply #7 on: April 01, 2016, 12:46:32 pm »

Looks good, great job on your first knife. It appears you figured out the best way to drill the scales.

Heres a quick simple trick to fitting scales on a blade with no guard.

On my knives with no guard I drill one side of the scales through the blade at a time but don't permanently attach them to the blade yet. Then use a couple pins to attach the two scales together and finish off the front of the scales in the ricasso area. Then when the scales are attached to the blade both sides match and align perfectly with one another on the blade.
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« Reply #8 on: April 01, 2016, 05:18:25 pm »

I tried Cliffs drilling tricks only to fail installing the rivets. My fault entirely; carpenters with hammers ain't very good knife kit builds. After destroying my first set of fitted Bloodwood scales I quit the rivet caper and epoxied the second set in place. I like the clean look. No hammer needed.
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« Reply #9 on: April 02, 2016, 09:13:31 am »

Too modern.

The rivets are what places it into the time frame.

They 'can' be simulated with tacks or even by drilling through the entire assembly and using thick brass wire or rod epoxied in place, though.

A rawhide wrap 'with' tacks makes into an ideal knife for the era from the fur Trapper Era, all the way past the SAW time frame - little changed, except for the sheath decoration.

Scouts Out!
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« Reply #10 on: April 09, 2016, 02:14:06 am »

Update!  I have finished the Second Green River Knife called "Hunter" not Camper.  My mistake.  Both knives can shave hair.  I kid you not.

The first you've seen before, called "Dadley", with the Curley Maple scales.

The second I just finished, is pictured below called "Hunter", complete with Mesquite scales, dyed with Light Brown Leather Oil Dye.

I have extra Brass Rivets left.  So, sometime down the road I just might build another.

I hope you enjoy the pics.

Thank you.


* Two Finished Green River Knives (Dadley, and Hunter).jpg (98.58 KB, 778x438 - viewed 312 times.)

* Both Green River Knives - Completed.jpg (92.07 KB, 756x426 - viewed 286 times.)
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« Reply #11 on: April 09, 2016, 10:01:26 am »

You can build a new one for less by buying a carbon steel butcher's knife at a yard sale for a couple of bucks (if that) and then re-shaping the blade to suit.

I teach the Scouts how to replicate an 'Indian Knife and Sheath' all the time, and they're producing pretty nice-looking stuff, rawhide-wraps, tack or copper decoration, beaded/painted sheaths and all, and when they're done, not only do they look 'right', they're usable camp knives.

The bottom one that you show was once called the 'Camper's Knife' - handy and light, mine became the cardboard 'model' that they follow.

I use carbon steel, because the Indian used it, and they sharpen quickly.

Once the blade's darkened, they look like they ought to.

Scouts Out!
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Bruce W Sims
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« Reply #12 on: May 03, 2016, 07:48:47 am »

It think the OP's knife came out great!
I have a couple of Green River knives and the biggest challenge wasn't the drilling
but using the rivets. I tried a hammer and completely destroyed my first set of
scales. The second set, I used a large vice to slowly press the rivets into place.
The result was much better. I wrapped the handle in brown leather lace, but am not real happy
with the result. I have been haunting Pinterest for pics of antique and vintage knives but
have not found exactly the look I want. FWIW.

Best Wishes,

Bruce
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Delmonico
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« Reply #13 on: October 09, 2016, 08:25:02 pm »

I picked up a Russel Forge Skinner a few years ago with a broke scale, paid $1 for it, fixed it right up.  Steel rod rivets as well as epoxy, a using knife that gets blood on it and I like the sanitary part of them being sealed after all the things I've seen under old scales.


Although the knife by the eye of round is my 1880's Sheffield made Crissman with original scales that are sealed.   I thought I'd lost it last year so it stays in the kitchen now.  Besides my wife and niece were not happy I took it to camp, they missed it while I was gone.


* PICT5953-1.jpg (37.83 KB, 639x222 - viewed 119 times.)

* Picture 062.jpg (203.12 KB, 640x359 - viewed 153 times.)
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« Reply #14 on: October 10, 2016, 12:07:59 am »

My go to camp knife,  I like the roach belly and charcoal forged carbon blade is both flexible & holds a very good edge.
6 brass pins hold the sealed curly maple scales.


* my knife.jpg (26.76 KB, 200x200 - viewed 118 times.)
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Delmonico
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« Reply #15 on: October 11, 2016, 12:53:37 am »

A little different than my belt knife, but close, cut down from an old butcher knife with way to thin of a blade, got rid of about 1/2 of it and it don't flex anymore, sealed Eastern Red Cedar from a piece I slabbed, grandpa planted the tree in 1936 when he got the farm.  Brother has it's twin made from another old knife. 


* knives022.jpg (27 KB, 532x339 - viewed 134 times.)

* knives022.jpg (27 KB, 532x339 - viewed 121 times.)
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Always get the water for the coffee upstream from the herd.

Ab Ovo Usque ad Mala

The time has passed so quick, the years all run together now.
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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  Special Interests - Groups & Societies  |  The Cutting Edge (Moderator: St. George)  |  Topic: Russel Green River Knife Kit Project « previous next »
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