Javascript DHTML Drop Down Menu Powered by dhtml-menu-builder.com
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
November 21, 2017, 05:51:21 pm

Login with username, password and session length

Search:     Advanced search
* Home FlashChat Help Calendar Login Register
Currently there are 0 Users in the Cas City Chat Rooms!
Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  Special Interests - Groups & Societies  |  Cosie's Corner & Feed Bag (Moderator: Delmonico)  |  Topic: Question for Delmonico 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: [1] Go Down Print
Author Topic: Question for Delmonico  (Read 2888 times)
Oregon Bill
American Plainsmen Society
Top Active Citizen
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 704


« on: September 14, 2015, 10:14:25 am »


Del, mon frere, do have any information on when sauerkraut appears in North America? Friends on another forum are wondering about whether it would have been commonly encountered in 18th-century Colonial America. I would think yes, especially in areas settled by Moravians and "Pennsylvania Dutch."
Logged
Delmonico
Deputy Marshal
Top Active Citizen
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 24287



« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2015, 11:32:03 am »

It came in with the German, the Dutch and the French settlers.   Maybe even the English, remember it was used as a way to preserve food, not just because they liked the way it tasted.
Logged

Mongrel Historian


Always get the water for the coffee upstream from the herd.

Ab Ovo Usque ad Mala

The time has passed so quick, the years all run together now.
Mogorilla
NCOWS
Top Active Citizen
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 1181



« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2015, 12:56:20 pm »

I can toss my $0.02, my family came to Illinois from Wurtenburg circa 1850 (both sides) and settled in the central part of the state.   My grandmother was born 1888 and learned to make kraut from her mother.  Kraut and cabbage as a whole was big in the family food prep.   Grandma said you could tell where a person came from by how they fixed their cabbage rolls.  Wurtenburg being south east, grandma used tomatoes and caraway seeds in her cabbage rolls, further north you went, people used kraut to cook the rolls. 

I am pretty sure the Hessian soldiers employed by the Brits had kraut, so I am guessing it was present from the 18th century.
Logged

NCOWS #3297
Delmonico
Deputy Marshal
Top Active Citizen
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 24287



« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2015, 01:53:03 pm »

A quick look at my handy worn old Collegiate dictionary says it became a work in American English about 1617, so that pretty well conferms it in my book.
Logged

Mongrel Historian


Always get the water for the coffee upstream from the herd.

Ab Ovo Usque ad Mala

The time has passed so quick, the years all run together now.
Oregon Bill
American Plainsmen Society
Top Active Citizen
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 704


« Reply #4 on: September 16, 2015, 08:58:20 am »

Thankee, gents.

 Cool
Logged
Scattered Thumbs
Top Active Citizen
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1265



« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2016, 04:03:45 pm »

Besides being a preserve sauerkraut was used as a source of ascorbic acid in the Royal Navy to prevent scurvy. That in the days of Captain Cook.
Logged
Pages: [1] Go Up Print 
Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  Special Interests - Groups & Societies  |  Cosie's Corner & Feed Bag (Moderator: Delmonico)  |  Topic: Question for Delmonico « previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.05 seconds with 22 queries.