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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  CAS TOPICS  |  Gunsmithing  |  Topic: Antiquing "How-To" 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: Antiquing "How-To"  (Read 100345 times)
Virginia Gentleman
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« Reply #50 on: January 25, 2008, 10:18:23 am »

How do you make holster wear?  Make lots of passes through the holster until the metal starts showing?
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Marshal Will Wingam
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« Reply #51 on: January 25, 2008, 12:00:29 pm »

That is one way to do it but I think you'd loose interest after a while. You could put jeweler's rouge or polishing compound on a piece of leather and rub the high points until it shows the same amount of wear you would find on an old pistol. A couple photos of old guns would let you know where to do this to really look authentic. A little care would produce a good result. If you have a holster you don't want to use again, you could put the polishing compound all over the inside and start in but that would still be doing things the hard way.
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Delgado
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« Reply #52 on: February 02, 2008, 05:54:20 pm »

Great idea Marshal. The cheapest and ugliest holster will be transformed into very special tool.
But please don´t try this job with the cylinder in only one  position, unless you want a very funny wearing pattern. Shocked

Delgado
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Daniel Nighteyes
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« Reply #53 on: February 28, 2009, 11:46:08 am »

I've posted these pics on SCORRS, and thought they might also be appropriate here.  I started with a pair of Uberti New Model Armies with that butt-ugly Millennium finish.  I dissassembled them, then degreased thoroughly with brake cleaner. I removed the finish by soaking them in white vinegar and wiping off with a series of paper towels.  By the way, I discovered that part of the Millennium finishing process involved bead-blasting the metal.  Next came a thorough soaking in a baking-soda/water solution, and an even more thorough rinsing under running tap water.

The moment they hit the air, they started oxidizing, so I rubbed them down really well with lots of oil.  I thoroughly swabbed out and oiled the bores too.

Next came the fun part -- using and shooting them in matches and, with reasonable care, letting them age on their own.  Several times I've been asked if they're originals, which pleases me greatly.


Here's how they looked shortly after I finished them, but before installing  "aged ivory" grips and the "antique finish" R&D conversion cylinders.  Note that I did not strip the finish from the percussion cylinders:




Here's how they looked with the new grips/cylinders and a few months of handling and use:



And here's how they look today, after better than a year of handling and use:





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Jubel
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« Reply #54 on: March 09, 2009, 10:24:22 pm »

Well here's my nickels worth, I purchased a Richards Mason that came from the factory antiqued it was the only
one in 45 Schofield I could find locally. It had the standard 8"  1/2 bbl. I purchased a 5 1/2 BBL from Cimarron and I
followed the directions for antiquing using white vinagar until I matched the new BBL to the rest of the revolver. I
then used the polimar gun cleaner and protectant by Sweet Shooter as directed and so far rap on wood, no rust or
discoloration. This was two (2) years and many rounds ago.
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Cousin we been ashooten at each other all day! How about we stop for a beer then we kin go home and get our axes. Or just as good, lets forget this whole dang feud, I'm agetten too old for this anyhow!
IE300
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IT AIN'T A BIG .50 - IT'S JUST A LITTLE 45-70


« Reply #55 on: May 01, 2009, 10:15:10 pm »

Here's my Pietta Remington 1858 nice and pretty from the factory.


* 1858BEFORE.jpg (26.02 KB, 640x480 - viewed 954 times.)
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HEART & SOUL IN THE OLD WEST
IE300
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IT AIN'T A BIG .50 - IT'S JUST A LITTLE 45-70


« Reply #56 on: May 01, 2009, 10:28:15 pm »

Here's my Pietta Remington 1858 after I destroyed it. Well, I'm not quite finished destroying it yet, I have a few more adjustments to make before I head into the sunset. Or maybe I'll just let time and wear take it from here.
I won't detail my metal finishing here. Suffice it to say that I did a bunch of experimentation, and ended up doing some variations on what you read about other peoples techniques on this site. It was all fun.
I cut the barrel to 5.5", cut the loading lever to match (although it has no latch to keep it from flopping around, so I'll probably never use it. I sanded the grips and finished them using USMC leather die, worked great on the wood! The cylinder pin retaining block (that's what I'm calling it, anyway) I fabricated from a scrap drillbit and some 1/4" steel I had. I drilled and tapped it to accomodate the retaining screw with the knurled brass button shown in the photo detail. I silver soldered a piece of square steel to the bottom front of the cylinder pin, just to fill the small space below it which would have been exposed. This was just cosmetic, but I like the result. The brass trigger guard I gave a slight copper plating to using some old jewelers pickle. Copper ages faster than brass, so I figured I'd give it a try. I fabricated the 2 crosses for the handles from a little scrap sterling, and affixed them with JB Weld, after degreasing the handles. I buffed the handles with the crosses on a buffer, hit them both again with the dye and hand rubbed them. I'll be the first to admit that my gunsmithing is primitive, but this project came out about as I would have hoped for. I finished it with a holster kit I bought from Tandy Leather. Nothing fancy, but I wasn't going to put my creation in a holster I didnt at least put together myself. Unfortunately, now I got the bug and I'm afraid there will be more such projects in the near future.
THE CROSSES ARE A TRIBUTE TO CLINT EASTWOOD
THE NAME OF THIS PISTOL IS "THE PREACHER"
[/b]


* 1858FINAL 001.jpg (14.91 KB, 576x432 - viewed 1236 times.)

* 1858FINAL 003.jpg (20.49 KB, 576x432 - viewed 1003 times.)

* 1858FINAL 004.jpg (15.32 KB, 576x432 - viewed 788 times.)

* 1858FINAL 002.jpg (14.72 KB, 576x432 - viewed 1056 times.)
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HEART & SOUL IN THE OLD WEST
Curley Cole
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« Reply #57 on: May 02, 2009, 01:18:36 am »





I got this Dakota years ago as a kit so it was in the "white", so I wanted to finish it to look well used. Well, that and using it for 25 some years has made it come true....

The gun in the book under my gun is Doc Hollidays and it looks very much similar...(pix doesn't do it justice.)

good shootin
curley
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Curley Cole
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« Reply #58 on: May 02, 2009, 01:21:30 am »

Sorry gang, didn't realize I had already posted to this thread....my apologiezs...

curley
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olered54
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« Reply #59 on: May 06, 2010, 08:24:12 am »

I am looking at purchasing a Stoeger Silverado. This is a used SXS and  the owner will sell it to me for a very good price. It is in excellent condition and has the brushed nickle finish. Is it possible to remove that finish as easily as removing bluing? The finish is in really good shape but, I would prefer to making the gun look older and more used. Brushed nickle is not my favorite for long guns. Please let me know about removing this finish. Thanks
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andy42s
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« Reply #60 on: May 17, 2010, 07:34:53 pm »


Here's an updated picture of my new vaquero. I flitzed the ferric chloride finish, and finally tarnished the brass grip frame, and dulled the grips
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Alphawolf45
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« Reply #61 on: July 17, 2010, 05:22:05 am »

 My first post here..Great forum.
.
I colorcasehardened this new receiver last week and the color pattern looked garish and didnt suit me..Remembering having recently read this thread and admired some of the 'antiqued ' guns .. I rubbed off the colors with 400 grit wet and dri and I like the appearance of worn off color case hardening...I see some of you fellers prefer the dull appearance ..I like some shine however as I think a cared for gun would be rubbed with rags frequently and wear to a shine going in and out of holster and scabbord.


 
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andy42s
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« Reply #62 on: April 25, 2011, 03:50:48 pm »


My 1851 navy


My stoeger
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n4sir45
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« Reply #63 on: July 09, 2011, 05:40:27 pm »

Can someone Antique a Stainless Ruger Vaquero? I have 2 Shiny Stainless Ruger Vaquero's that I'd like to look like they were from the old west. One of the 2 is an old model and the other is brand new model.
Anyone who wants to write me about it you can here or at n4sir45(at)msn(dot)com with instructions.
any are appreciated.
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Roscoe Coles
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« Reply #64 on: October 22, 2011, 11:33:33 am »

The problem with the dip methods is that  guns come out looking like they have obviously been "antiqued".  Old guns always loose their finish at the high pints and have traces of finish in the low spots and protected areas.  The dip method removes the finish everywhere, which makes them look wrong.  But hey, I have always followed the "use it to make it look old" school of thought. 
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Junkman
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« Reply #65 on: October 23, 2011, 09:42:57 pm »


My 1851 navy


I hope you realize that the wedge on that '51 is upside down!  Roll Eyes
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Mako
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« Reply #66 on: October 28, 2011, 09:32:54 pm »

I hope you realize that the wedge on that '51 is upside down!  Roll Eyes

Junkman,
My question is how that could be done if the wedge retention screw is in place.  "You can't get there from here..."

~Mako
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Junkman
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« Reply #67 on: October 31, 2011, 10:25:25 am »

C'mon Mako. I do not understand your question, since I do not see a picture that indicates the wedge retention screw is installed! You know damned well the wedge is upside down.
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Mako
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« Reply #68 on: October 31, 2011, 11:25:20 am »

C'mon Mako. I do not understand your question, since I do not see a picture that indicates the wedge retention screw is installed! You know damned well the wedge is upside down.

Calm down... My point is that you are correct, furthermore the wedge retention screw can't be in place because you can't put a wedge in upside down if it is.  It was a rhetorical question.  I'm sorry if it sounded like I was disagreeing with you. Sad

Regards,
Mako
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Junkman
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« Reply #69 on: October 31, 2011, 12:02:49 pm »

Mako,

I'm calm. I knew the screw could not be installed due to the lip on the wedge. I just didn't understand your rhetoric. Sorry. Sometimes the written word doesn't come off as it would have face to face. No harm/no foul, as they say.  Grin
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« Reply #70 on: October 31, 2011, 04:21:56 pm »

Back about three pages, I figured we had this one run inta the ground.  Anyway, since we're here, how about some aphorisms.  They are a great way of aging things quickly!

"S-it happens!"

"Time flies when you're havin fun"

So the conclusion is;  Have more fun and everything will acquire the patina of experience much more quickly! Cool Cool
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« Reply #71 on: October 31, 2011, 09:41:43 pm »

The pickled frame on my early blued .44 mag Vaquero is wearing nicely, looking great with the rest of the blued gun. The stainless Vaquero I bought at the same time is not aging as well, retaining most of it's lustre, but I like it just fine.

One of my Uberti .45s from the same era has that odd 'fire blued' finish that is aging nicely. It doesn't wear well and I've let it happen naturally. Some enhancement might actually improve it. It's companion is the standard dark blue and just starting to show wear.

I've never quite understood 'antiquing' a gun, as in the historic era, it would have looked like what it was - a fairly new and valued tool that saw daily or frequent use. The more service, the more marks. Honourably earned 'hash marks', like some scars, add character, each one a chapter in a story. But, I admit that some 'antiqued' guns look interesting.

Where I have problems is when it accentuates wear like a lot of 'tuning' and 'actions jobs' I've seen. I'm a believer in "if it ain't broke, don't fix it."; letting things wear in naturally rather than speeding up the process. I like my women (wife) and my guns to look too damn young for me .... ;>)
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Riot Earp
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« Reply #72 on: November 07, 2011, 09:00:30 am »

I've never quite understood 'antiquing' a gun, as in the historic era, it would have looked like what it was - a fairly new and valued tool that saw daily or frequent use.

There is always someone in every antiquing thread, on every gun-related site, who expresses this view.  Undecided

Antiquing isn't for everyone. But surely a gun carried on horseback in the elements would have aged rather quickly. Rain does nasty things to carbon steel. (Please, let's not extend the debate over this point, and thereby ruin this thread.)
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Indian Outlaw
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« Reply #73 on: January 20, 2012, 02:19:47 pm »

I am going to try the following method on a new Uberti London Navy:

http://disc.yourwebapps.com/discussion.cgi?disc=208184;article=296881

I think this method ages the gun more realistically than the vinegar-dip and acid-etch methods.

I refuse to bugger-up the screws, however.  Roll Eyes
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Gbeathar
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« Reply #74 on: March 17, 2012, 02:39:15 pm »

If you have any pitting or dings in the metal a French Grey finish will look pretty antique. Some mentioned toilet bowl cleaner to remove blueing. I use Brownells Blue and Rust Remover. The put the French Gray on with a product like PPG's Metal Conditioner. The longer you leave the in the conditioner, the darker they will be. You can then rub on and off rust oleum flat black. Any dings and pits will retain the black. It is a nice permanent antique look.

Gerry
BeathardEngraving.Com
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