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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  Special Interests - Groups & Societies  |  The Cutting Edge (Moderator: St. George)  |  Topic: Ed Kalfayan Bowie... love this knife. 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: Ed Kalfayan Bowie... love this knife.  (Read 6828 times)
Capnball
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Deo Vindice!


« on: December 25, 2014, 11:53:56 pm »


This is mainly just to show off the only really nice knife I've ever had, and solicit y'all's thoughts on her, as to value, etc. I got her a few years ago from a relative (who bought it in a lot of stuff at an estate auction). I traded him a handful of tanned furs from critters I trapped myself (proud of that part of the story, too). The knife means a lot to me, and my wife loves it too, so I don't plan on ever trading it off.

   The knife is marked "kalfayan". I looked it up, and Ed Kalfayan was a custom knifemaker up in Michigan. I believe he passed away in 2012. He made some absolutely stunning knives! This one could be considered one of the plainer ones. His knives seem to be pretty valuable, although I have not been able to find another knife quite like mine. I haven't really been able to come up with much info on Mr. Kalfayan, either.

   The knife measures about 15-1/2" overall, with a blade that is 10-3/8" long, 1-1/2" wide, and 1/4" thick at the spine. The scales are mastodon ivory. The blade has a kind of etched/aged look to it, but doesn't appear to be damascus.

   What do y'all think it's worth? Is the mastodon ivory at all period correct? What do y'all think of the knife overall? I love it's looks, wouldn't have minded it if it had had wood or horn scales, but like the mastodon too, and it holds a great edge, and balances superbly, right at the guard. It's skinned and boned out quite a handful of deer, and even slit the throat of one wounded buck (that gave my brother and I a merry chase over about 2 miles of rough terrain). Never thought I'd like this style of knife as much as I have for skinning and butchering, but I do.







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Jordan Goodwin, aka Capnball

"Blessed be the Lord my strength, which teacheth my hands to war, and my fingers to fight." (Ps. 144:1)

Reckon so.
Major 2
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« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2014, 06:22:19 am »

I'm by my own admission, no expert... but was intrigued by your knife, its a beauty.

A quick search , showed some of  Ed Kalfayan's (voting member Knifemakers Guild ) in the $300 - $800 range.
with two samples both coffin gripped,  drop points in the spirit of yours calling $700 & $800.

Where would yours would fall ?  Well it certainly, unique art of a fine craftsman now deceased, value is in the beholder and what one was willing to pay, I'd bet plenty !

"Mastodon ivory at all period correct ?"   Wink  well it's  10,000 years old ,  Species was discovered in the 17th century ...
The design of your looks on the lines of 1830-40's ....
Was it use ? why not ?  used a lot ?  , probably not ?   On the other hand its way more PC than say Corian® , faux Ivory, or many of the exotic wood laminates.

 I am envious , and you have fine heirloom there, you have every right to be proud...
Congrats on your Uberti too ...  
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Will Ketchum
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« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2014, 11:40:25 am »

Very nice knife. One I would be proud to own. 
I suggest since you intend to keep it that you write down how you acquired it and what you know about it.
If you find out more you can include that as well.
That way 100 years from now people will know as much as you do regarding the knife.

Will Ketchum
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« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2014, 11:43:46 am »

Ivory was definately used on handles. So it is quite possible that mastodon was used. Here are a couple of 1800's knives with Ivory. The first one is just listed as ivory J Peacroft Sheffield, The second one is listed as civil war Walrus Ivory handle.


* bowie ivory sm.jpg (72.6 KB, 450x579 - viewed 294 times.)

* bowie ivory 2 sm.jpg (112.83 KB, 967x725 - viewed 249 times.)
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The Elderly Kid
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« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2014, 01:23:04 pm »

Mammoth ivory has been "mined" in Siberia since the 16th century. In the early 19th century tons of it were imported to Europe because of the increasing demand for piano keys, billiard balls and handles (instruments as well as knives), furniture inlay, etc. It was deemed inferior to fresh-harvested elephant ivory but was much more abundant and therefore cheaper. I don't know if the Sheffield cutlers used it but I would be very surprised if they didn't.
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Long Knife Rich
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« Reply #5 on: December 26, 2014, 01:40:59 pm »

 That's a beautiful knife! I'm sure you're proud to own it.
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Bruce W Sims
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« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2015, 11:04:09 am »

Very nice knife. One I would be proud to own. 
I suggest since you intend to keep it that you write down how you acquired it and what you know about it.
If you find out more you can include that as well.
That way 100 years from now people will know as much as you do regarding the knife.

Will Ketchum

X2..... Seems like one of the best ways to make sure something is respected is to have it documented as well as possible.
I don't know how many times I have heard someone say "well, if I had known THAT about it...I wouldn't have let it go."
In this day and age folks have gotten pretty good at "creating" antiques. Sometimes it gets real hard to tell the difference from the real thing. You don't have to keep it in a glass jar, but you really should jot down all that you know and also see what else you can find out.  Just sayin....

Best Wishes,

Bruce
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bowiemaker
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« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2015, 12:14:26 pm »

If it were made today, you would have about $300-$400 worth of handle there. Mammoth ivory prices have skyrocketed. It is really not that rare but the Chinese have started buying it all and not as much makes it to the US anymore. It is a beautiful knife. I recommend soaking the handle overnight in mineral oil about once or twice a year to keep it from drying out and cracking as much.

Beware that if you do ever decide to sell it, some states have passed laws banning all trade in any kind of ivory regardless of age or origin and the there is pressure on the US Fish & Wildlife Department to pass a nationwide ban on all types of ivory. Just recently at a trade show in NJ dealers had their wares confiscated because they contained ivory or were suspected to contain ivory.
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« Reply #8 on: January 20, 2015, 04:11:05 pm »

Walrus ivory was the only real "cash-crop" of the Norse Greenland colony. It was collected by the bishop and transported to Norway where it was marketed to help finance the Crusades. A little earlier than our period, but it was available

I have a modern made bowie style knife with mastodon ivory scales.
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Dusty Ed
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« Reply #9 on: February 02, 2015, 07:55:06 pm »

Howdy Fellers
Go on Ellen Hunting site She has Mammoth Grips for sale.
She has her shop in New Jersey.

Dusty Ed Wink
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Dusty Ed
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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  Special Interests - Groups & Societies  |  The Cutting Edge (Moderator: St. George)  |  Topic: Ed Kalfayan Bowie... love this knife. « previous next »
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