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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  Special Interests - Groups & Societies  |  Cosie's Corner & Feed Bag (Moderator: Delmonico)  |  Topic: I could not believe they were giving them away 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: I could not believe they were giving them away  (Read 6267 times)
Mogorilla
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« on: September 30, 2014, 07:24:55 am »


Went to the farmer's market here two weeks ago and one of the beef sellers had a list of prices.  Next to Tongue it said FREE!   Well I said Wahoo! and asked for two, buying some other items out of guilt.   I cooked them up this weekend and am now eating Lingua Tacos.  MMM MMMM Good.   

Lingua Tacos
1 beef tongue
2 carrots chunked
1 onions quartered
2 stalks celery chunked
2 cloves of garlic.

Place above items in a stock pan and cover in cold water.  Bring to a boil and simmer for 3 to 4 hours, checking periodically to ensure the tongue still covered with water, supplementing as needed.
Remove tongue from broth and place in an ice water bath, makes it easier to handle quicker.   Reserve 1 cup of broth.  Toss the veggies, they have given their all.   If you have a pooch, they will thank you for the broth with many kisses and tail wags.

Pull tongue from ice and pull off the skin.  These are the taste buds.  Should come off easy, use a small knife to help if needed.  Through that stuff away.  You now have a nice piece of very tender meat.   Slice and put on a sandwich (that is where one of mine went).

2 tablespoons oil
1 ancho pepper
1 new mexican dried chili.
1 cup stock
1 onion, sliced
1 green/red pepper diced
1 jalapeno seeded and chopped
2 cloves garlic, crushed
2 teaspoons cumin
1 teaspoon fresh oregano
salt and pepper to taste
1 beef tongue diced or shredded

I like to seed the two dried chilis to control the heat.  heat them in a dry skillet, then add the 1 cup of stock.  Bring to a boil and remove to a bowl to allow to soften.   Dry pan.   Return to heat and add oil.   Saute onions and peppers.  When onions are translucent, add garlic cumin and oregano.   cook for 30 second or so, then return the stock/pepper mix to pan.  Bring to a boil and remove from heat.   Place the hot mix into a blender or food processor and very carefully blend until smooth.   taste for seasoning, adding salt and pepper as needed.    In pan heat tongue and add your sauce to coat the meat.   serve with tortillas.


Good stuff.   You will be amazed at the flavor and texture of the tongue.
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NCOWS #3297
dusty texian
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« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2014, 06:33:41 pm »

Hey Mogorilla, that sounds like some Dang Good eating. Thanks for the recipe . Have you been back to the farmers market for another round? ,,,,,,DT
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Mogorilla
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« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2014, 08:09:42 am »

I did  Grin   Went back and got two more, in the freezer.   Ready to fix another around the holidays.   
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NCOWS #3297
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« Reply #3 on: November 19, 2014, 09:57:08 am »

Sounds good! Beef tongue use to be a dish served around my home growing up on a special cook out. Have not had it in quite some time. We would boil the tongue then skin the outside membrane off and then roast them down in a black iron pot in the oven. I sure miss eating that. Thanks for the reminder About time I teach the Grandkids that dish.,,,,DT
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Shotgun Franklin
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« Reply #4 on: November 19, 2014, 10:00:24 am »

Tongue is also excellent as a sandwich meat.

There is a story about a Cowboy, not from Texas Lord help him, who while visiting went to a Taco Joint for breakfast. He saw a sign            ' Breakfast Special - Lingua Tacos'. He asked his Waitress what Lingua was? She told him 'Cow Tongue'. He rolled his eyes and told her, 'I ain't eatein' nothing out'a no cow's mouth. Just give me two eggs instead'.
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Mogorilla
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« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2014, 08:17:36 am »

Growing up we had a few steers and pigs. (chickens and rabbits too).   Dad was adament we did not name them, they were food and when the time came he was also adament we were using it all but the oink and the moo.  So, tongue was definitely eaten.  Went to college and moved off campus with a few other lads.   We budgeted food to have enogh beer money, so we shopped at this Menonite market north of town.  They had tongue for a buck, so I bought some.  First time I cooked it, everyone said no.   Next time one of the guys said, "that looks normal" so he tried it.   By the time we graduated we were going through 5 or 6 a month.   Now 25 years later they can be expensive in some areas.  I was floored to find them for free.  I brought in the Lingua tacos to work, they were slow to go, but a few tried then a few more, then boom they were gone.
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NCOWS #3297
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« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2016, 04:44:46 pm »

I am amazed. I had the notion that buffalo tongue was considered a delicacy back in the day. So this present disdain of a similar product leaves me.  Huh
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St. George
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« Reply #7 on: March 22, 2016, 11:44:58 am »

A lot of tastes changed from 'back in the day'...

Folks got away from meats like that, along with calves' liver, tripe and head cheese - they just didn't hold an appeal, so when they were offered on a menu, they didn't sell, and as a result - many of today's adults didn't grow up in houses or eat in working man's cafes where those were common - their tastes went more for meatloaf, steaks and chops.

Today, folks are getting more adventurous - but those old-time and Depression-Era foods are going to take a long time before a resurgence.

Just for the sheer hell of it - 'try' finding a place where good, tender Liver and Onions are served - it's an adventure...

Good Hunting!

Scouts Out!
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It Wasn't Schoolboys and Ladies - It Was Cowtowns and Sin..."
Mogorilla
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« Reply #8 on: March 22, 2016, 02:26:33 pm »

Amen to that St. George.   Grew up in a frugal household.   Still love liver and onions.   I have to say though my new favorite way to eat liver is take some calf liver and soak it in salt water overnight.  Change water once or twice.   Rinse and pat dry.   Fire up a grill with real wood, or charcoal lumps.  When the coals are just right, salt and pepper the liver and throw it on the grate.   Flip it in about 3 minutes.  As thin as they slice liver, it only takes about 5 minutes, but it gets a nice grilled smokey flavor that is great.   We had a 9 lb rescue poodle who was usually good as gold and as well behaved as the angel he was but when that liver was on the table, he was a right stinker wanting his share.   Can't eat it now without getting misty eyed!
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NCOWS #3297
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« Reply #9 on: March 22, 2016, 03:39:56 pm »

A lot of tastes changed from 'back in the day'...

Folks got away from meats like that, along with calves' liver, tripe and head cheese - they just didn't hold an appeal, so when they were offered on a menu, they didn't sell, and as a result - many of today's adults didn't grow up in houses or eat in working man's cafes where those were common - their tastes went more for meatloaf, steaks and chops.

Today, folks are getting more adventurous - but those old-time and Depression-Era foods are going to take a long time before a resurgence.

Just for the sheer hell of it - 'try' finding a place where good, tender Liver and Onions are served - it's an adventure...

Good Hunting!

Scouts Out!

I'm Portuguese and 58, all those things are just normal to me.
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St. George
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« Reply #10 on: March 22, 2016, 04:39:25 pm »

I've loved L&O since I was a little boy, and it's always a treat whenever my travels lead me to a diner.

When I was stationed at Fort Leavenworth, there was a cafe' in town that did it with 'mounds' of fried onions, smothering it, and then some, and I'd go down on Saturday afternoons, and partake.

Sometimes, we'd make a pilgrimage and there'd be a couple of cars full of guys remembering their childhoods.

They did one of 'the' best Chicken Fried Steaks ever, and of course, they closed...

Being brought up in the Mid-West - with all the war brides and their families of that era, the wide variety of 'international' dishes I enjoyed prepared me well for duty in Europe.

Vaya,

Scouts Out!
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"It Wasn't Cowboys and Ponies - It Was Horses and Men.
It Wasn't Schoolboys and Ladies - It Was Cowtowns and Sin..."
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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  Special Interests - Groups & Societies  |  Cosie's Corner & Feed Bag (Moderator: Delmonico)  |  Topic: I could not believe they were giving them away « previous next »
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