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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  Special Interests - Groups & Societies  |  Cosie's Corner & Feed Bag (Moderator: Delmonico)  |  Topic: I know British foods have a bad reputation, but..... 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: I know British foods have a bad reputation, but.....  (Read 10111 times)
Forty Rod
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« on: July 21, 2014, 10:43:51 am »


....., while I have to agree for the most part, there are some Brit food products that I wouldn't like to be without.

HP brown sauce is better than A-1 or any steak sauce for some things.  I prefer it on any pork and in things like a beef stew.

Norfolk Manor malt vinegar is the best for breaded or fried fish, except trout and salmon, and is terrible on any shell fish.

Coleman's powdered hot mustard is for stew and a dash in scrambled eggs before they are cooked.  Be careful.  Coleman's can go from just right to way too hot in a hurry.  Also like a small amount in curried chicken or pork.

Coleman's also make a great horse radish sauce that I use instead of American style processed horse radish for some things, but not for everything.

Garibaldi raisin filled biscuits at Christmas.  I was raised on them and still love them once a year.

Lea and Perrins worcestershire (old spelling)  sauce is still the best.

They still make Ovaltine the old way over there, like when I was a kid.  No high fructose anything and the formula tastes better.

Gale's lemon curd on toast or breakfast biscuit is tied for America's King Kelly orange marmalade for my breakfast toast.  Grant's also makes a suitable lemon curd if Grant' isn't available.

Finally, Rose's lemon and lime marmalade is an acquired taste but I'm glad I acquired it.

How about British / English / Irish / Scottish/ or Welch foods or condiments that you like.  Must be some things out there.

Seems I recall someone with an Irish soda bread recipe, but I can't find it.

BTW, even though I have a high percentage of Scottish blood I can't stand their oatmeal and haggis is crap.
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Delmonico
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« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2014, 11:36:07 am »

I'll try remember to get you the soda bread recipe when I'm at home with my files.  If someone offers you one that uses baking powder or sultana raisins instead of currents be polite, say thank you and toss it in the trash. Grin
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Mogorilla
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« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2014, 07:12:41 am »

Just got back from across the pond.   Spent 8 days in england and 6 days in Paris.  I thought the food was great in both countries, but the French have the Brits beat on Bread and Coffee.   We drove from London to Cornwall, stopping in Salsbury plain to visit Stonehenge and Glastonbury, seeing all the southern King Arthur related sites (my first and foremost historical passion is King Arthur).  Brits love their breakfast.   i sampled blood pudding and bangers where ever we stayed.    I think the rural local brands were better than what we had in London.   I have always been an anglophile, so I agree with most of what you listed 40R.   Probably sacrilege, but I use Colemans powdered mustard in my Hot German Potato salad.   (will try and remember to post that recipe too.  I like it 50-50 beets and potatoes, great combo).   I love all types of marmalades, will have to find some lime to try.   Love Garibaldi biscuits.  They are really similar to a Christmas cookie my grandmother made, called fill cookies.   The filing in those was a mincemeat/nut combo that was rich unto itself and made the best mince pie immaginable.  Speaking of, Brits know their Mince pies!   

Now I want to go back, oh wait I woke up that way.
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Slowhand53
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« Reply #3 on: August 13, 2014, 04:06:18 pm »

My late Australian brother in law got me hooked on Cornwells Lancashire Relish. Has a sort of fruity taste and goes good with steaks & stews.
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Forty Rod
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« Reply #4 on: August 13, 2014, 04:51:01 pm »

Worth a try.  Thanks.
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Mean Bob Mean
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« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2014, 07:19:13 pm »

Great stuff:

I make Caul Stew, the Welsh "national" dish and I have a terrific recipe for scones that is nothing to make and they are better than any I have ever purchased here or there.  

I like Roast Beef and yorkshire pudding, we have Bubbles and Squeak on boxing day and we all love Mince and mashed with peas.  

Moma used to make the most fantastic steak and kidney pie, I am trying to come up with a suitable recipe.  

Shortbread, Walker's cookies, great stuff.  

Many great recipes for Chutney out there which is wonderful on pork and venison. 

Had a recipe for leek and rabbit pie . . .
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Reverend P. Babcock Chase
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« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2014, 09:25:40 pm »

Howdy Anglophiles (Isn't that what you use for truing up dovetails?0,

What about Irish Black and White pudding(s) (sausages)?

Reverend Chase
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Ol Gabe
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« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2014, 08:53:02 am »

Yummm!
Don't forget about Tatties & Neeps, Welsh Rarebit, Cockaleekie (sp?) Soup and a nice bit of 'Spotted Dick' to go with it all?
OK, now I'm getting a case of the mid-morning munchies!
Best regards and keep on cookin'!
'Ol Gabe
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Mogorilla
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« Reply #8 on: August 15, 2014, 04:47:35 pm »

I tried several varieties of black puddings along southern England this summer.  Also had Welsh Rarebit.  Grew up with that as it was often breakfast on a cold winter morning.   Especially loved it when the cheese got good and brown.    From Central Illinois originally, so we have our own version of Rarebit, but more artery clogging.   Man I could murder a horseshoe and nails about now!
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« Reply #9 on: August 15, 2014, 06:43:16 pm »

Spotted Dick.....
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Skeeter Lewis
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« Reply #10 on: August 16, 2014, 04:43:15 am »

Spotted dick! Now you're talking! Our puddings are great.
As a Brit, I'm delighted to see so many of you enjoying our terrific foods. Anyone tried Toad in the Hole?
 If you're ever over here, try our cheeses. They're the equal (or superior) of French cheeses.
Skeeter

PS The original name is Welsh rabbit but at some point it got gentrified to 'rarebit'.
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Major 2
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« Reply #11 on: August 16, 2014, 05:27:13 am »

Catch me up here Morg... Smiley 

Horseshoe & nails ?   I'm thinking its a sandwich  Undecided  Ham & fries with melted Welsh rarebit cheddar.


I'm fond of Fish & Chips , and Bangers & Eggs  Smiley

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Mogorilla
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« Reply #12 on: August 16, 2014, 09:19:16 am »

yup.  Horseshoe and nails, invented in and around Springfield Illinois.   Open face sandwich, toasted thick bread on either side of the plate, topped with traditionally ham, but you can get turkey, beef and hamburger now, fries in the middle covered in a welsh rarebit sauce.   tasty once a year
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« Reply #13 on: August 16, 2014, 10:05:44 am »

I was in Springfield a few years back , stayed in Riverton actually, for the National Arab horse show, Daughter was entered...

There was restaurant/bar we went to, they serve the classic Horseshoe & nails .... it was great !
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Mean Bob Mean
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« Reply #14 on: August 17, 2014, 12:56:02 pm »

Spotted dick! Now you're talking! Our puddings are great.
As a Brit, I'm delighted to see so many of you enjoying our terrific foods. Anyone tried Toad in the Hole?
 If you're ever over here, try our cheeses. They're the equal (or superior) of French cheeses.
Skeeter

PS The original name is Welsh rabbit but at some point it got gentrified to 'rarebit'.

Oh yeah, toads in the hole or "eggy basket" is a long time favorite as is beef Wellington and a properly made trifle.  Love me some Scottish smoked salmon as well.
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« Reply #15 on: August 17, 2014, 02:32:01 pm »

My mom's heritage is Yorkshire toned down with Ontario in the 1830's and Saskatchewan in the 1906-1936 timeframe.  Mom's best meal was roast beef and Yorkshire pudding. Her gravy was to die for. Off days, when a quick meal was required was usually toad in a hole. Emergency food, when a pack of tired and hungry kids needed feeding could be a large pyrex pie plate with eggs broken in and covered with grated cheddar then baked.

Boiled and mashed turnip can be surprisingly good, especially when carrot and parsnip are included. Sweetened up with brown sugar was routine.
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Forty Rod
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« Reply #16 on: August 17, 2014, 03:18:47 pm »

My mom's heritage is Yorkshire toned down with Ontario in the 1830's and Saskatchewan in the 1906-1936 timeframe.  Mom's best meal was roast beef and Yorkshire pudding. Her gravy was to die for. Off days, when a quick meal was required was usually toad in a hole. Emergency food, when a pack of tired and hungry kids needed feeding could be a large pyrex pie plate with eggs broken in and covered with grated cheddar then baked.

Boiled and mashed turnip can be surprisingly good, especially when carrot and parsnip are included. Sweetened up with brown sugar was routine.

No it can't.  I grew up on that stuff and would rather starve than let any get in my mouth.
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« Reply #17 on: August 17, 2014, 04:51:22 pm »

I used the term "surprisingly" deliberately. As it is an acquired taste, but I did enjoy it.  Nowadays, its hard even to find parsnips.
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Forty Rod
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« Reply #18 on: August 17, 2014, 05:30:44 pm »

In my case I'd be surprised if I could choke it down.   Cheesy
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« Reply #19 on: August 17, 2014, 06:56:10 pm »

Funny how that works. Some folks are nostalgic for he foods the grew up with while others are glad they don't have to eat that crap.  For me it's pinto beans & fried potatoes.  Lived on em as a kid & I could still eat em day in & day out. My sister can't gag em down.
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« Reply #20 on: August 18, 2014, 05:38:45 am »

I'm the same way... turnips, parsnips & rutabaga , I could never tolerate. My Sister on the other hand liked them  Roll Eyes
I was the same for Okra....

My Granddad, used to say " the only way he liked OKRA, was dipped in egg , rolled in cornmeal, fried in butter and thrown the HELL out ! "
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Stu Kettle
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« Reply #21 on: August 18, 2014, 06:52:16 am »

That's the only way I like okra too Tongue
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Forty Rod
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« Reply #22 on: August 18, 2014, 09:12:09 am »

Funny how that works. Some folks are nostalgic for he foods the grew up with while others are glad they don't have to eat that crap.  For me it's pinto beans & fried potatoes.  Lived on em as a kid & I could still eat em day in & day out. My sister can't gag em down.

I feel the same way about potato soup.  I enjoy potatoes almost every other way, but I'd starve in a swimming pool full of potato soup rather than eat any.
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Forty Rod
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« Reply #23 on: August 18, 2014, 09:14:47 am »

I'm the same way... turnips, parsnips & rutabaga , I could never tolerate. My Sister on the other hand liked them  Roll Eyes
I was the same for Okra....

My Granddad, used to say " the only way he liked OKRA, was dipped in egg , rolled in cornmeal, fried in butter and thrown the HELL out ! "



Terrible waste of egg, cornmeal, and butter.

Okra isn't food.  Okra is what food eats..... like hogs and cattle and chickens, etc. can turn okra into something truly delightful.  Grin
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Ol Gabe
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« Reply #24 on: August 18, 2014, 09:50:35 am »

What Forty Rod just said, with a Norwegian twist...
Ten plus years ago I stumbled onto a post from a Norwegian CAS Pard, we traded laughs and suchlike and I said if he was ever in the States to give me a "Hi, Ho!" and we'd find a Shoot to get to so he could experience our style of CAS.
Well, 6 months later he called and said he was heading my way, we got him situated in our cabin out back in our forest and then we proceeded to swap stories and pics of his Norwegian CAS events. The next day my Shooting Pard, our guest & I headed out for an NCOWS event in Northern Iowa, we dressed him in a slouch hat, boots that surprisingly fit, an old shirt and a duster...he was in Pig Heaven! he used our gear and had a great time. That night we went to my Pards house and he fed our guest some Iowa gourmet...fresh garden tomatoes, green beans, late Summer greens, 'taters, Summer squash, steaks and plenty of good libations.
As he started to chow down, he kept avoiding the greens and other garden goodies, only tucking into the meat and 'taters. When asked if he didn't like the veggies, he looked us straight in the eye and said "I don't eat what my food eats!" We laughed as he explained he meant that he didn't eat greens as that was what was fed to hogs and cattle in his country to fatten them up.
Cultural differences are always interesting. He joked as how he wouldn't eat much when he went to England on business either, sticking to sausage or steak sandwiches.
Best regards and good eats!
'Ol Gabe
P.S. Do they use Okra to fatten up hogs in the South?
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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  Special Interests - Groups & Societies  |  Cosie's Corner & Feed Bag (Moderator: Delmonico)  |  Topic: I know British foods have a bad reputation, but..... « previous next »
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