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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  CAS TOPICS  |  The Leather Shop (Moderators: Marshal Will Wingam, Ten Wolves Fiveshooter)  |  Topic: Hand Stitching Leather 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: Hand Stitching Leather  (Read 58288 times)
Massive
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« Reply #125 on: February 05, 2014, 10:36:06 pm »

By the way, they have more sizes and colours on their main site.  I prefer to buy off the ebay site.  But they have a lot of sizes from 69 on up 400s and for colours white, beige, brown, black.
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« Reply #126 on: February 06, 2014, 09:06:17 am »

Thanks, everyone for your help, . . . one wouldn't think just finding a spool of thread would be this exasperating, . . .

So far, every thing else I have tried, . . . to me it does not LOOK right, . . . and the white thread I'm getting from Tandy actually does not like the dye.  It will take it, . . . but it would look better if the thread were colored first.

I do that sometimes by dying the thread itself ahead of time, . . . but I just hate to spend that extra effort and time if I could somewhere / somehow find the right thread so I don't have to.

This waxed thread pulls tight and stays tight for my Boss, . . . even if every now and then I have to take 15 minutes and clean the wax off the thread route.

May God bless,
Dwight
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« Reply #127 on: February 06, 2014, 10:37:27 am »

http://www.thethreadexchange.com/miva/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Category_Code=waxed-thread
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« Reply #128 on: February 06, 2014, 07:15:02 pm »

I use Tandy's waxed braided thread but I only hand stich.  Comes in several colors like black, brown, beige, white, red and blue.  It threads on the needle easy.  Looks much better on a finished project for me.

AC
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« Reply #129 on: February 07, 2014, 09:19:23 am »

Hey all,
I use Tandy's as well, but lately I have found their quality went down, the thread having unexpected weak spots.  So, I am looking about.   I am curious, does anyone know what ply of thread Tandy's is?  There are variety of plys and thicknesses and sometimes I have wanted thinner thread and ended up trying to unwind the Tandy stuff.   I would like to know more about the differences.

Thanks
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« Reply #130 on: February 07, 2014, 10:53:08 am »

Zack White Leather has heavy waxed thread in White, Brown and Black.
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Massive
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« Reply #131 on: February 07, 2014, 05:05:00 pm »

This waxed thread pulls tight and stays tight for my Boss, . . . even if every now and then I have to take 15 minutes and clean the wax off the thread route.

May God bless,
Dwight

Dwight, if you are using the Boss, why aren't you using the Tippman thread that I suggested.  That is designed for use in your machine, and comes in useful colours.  I ask because I was thinking of getting it the next time around. I like Z thread, and the price for the size, and their shipping up to here is all good for me.  But if you are running a Tippman machine, and don't like their thread, that would be important info before I invest.

The only company I know that sells thread heavy enough for our work in fancy colours is Weaver (not that you asked).  They now have a retail site, though I am still hoping they list some stuff on ebay.

Also, why are you using 347 thread.  Most people seem to use 270.  I just mention it because 270 and 205 are a lot more common, and they are more than strong enough.  I have some designs where I may have to go to 205 on the bobbin to hide the stitches in thinner material.
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Ray
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« Reply #132 on: February 12, 2014, 04:19:27 am »

Only hand stiching after deep grooving with two needles. Holes made by hand chisel pliers and awls and - if nothing helps - with a drilling machine.

When the sewing is done I lock the last two backstiches with a drop of glue (becomes invisible when dry) and finish it with an oversticher for an even look.

Best regards!
Ray
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« Reply #133 on: February 12, 2014, 12:31:19 pm »

I use this nylon thread in a brown color for nearly everything, unless I want to use artificial sinew. It's tough, it's pre-waxed and it comes in brown. If it comes off the spool with too much wax, I just run it over my thumbnail to scrape off the excess.

http://www.tandyleatherfactory.com/en-usd/home/department/lacing/threads-sinews/1227-038.aspx
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« Reply #134 on: February 12, 2014, 12:55:51 pm »

I'm going to merge this thread with out hand-stitching thread that's linked to in the FAQ thread. It's good information and that will put it all together.
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« Reply #135 on: December 29, 2014, 06:43:39 pm »

I use a drill press and a 1/16 bit to do the holes, I made a pony on the concept of the one posted on the first page, use 1x3 pine added a bit to the jaws and some leather so as not to scratch projects, I use a chunk of 4" pvc pipe with a slot as a spring, then hand stitch with 2 needles
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Massive
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« Reply #136 on: January 06, 2015, 09:30:19 pm »

http://www.mainethread.com/product10.html


These threads can be twisted to a "bristle", and the whole thing will sew like threading show lace, no struggle.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6OjahbhHGlY
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Skeeter Lewis
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« Reply #137 on: November 12, 2015, 04:03:36 pm »

Do pards know of an off-white linen thread that wouldn't look too new? Trying to get that old-time look.
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ChuckBurrows
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« Reply #138 on: November 12, 2015, 04:59:38 pm »

Barbour's Red Hand Linen comes in a light gray/natural unwaxed linen - Last time I bought some from Campbell-Randall, you might also check Ebay.
For period pieces I use 3 cord (mine is 20/3), and it also comes in 18/3, 25/3, and 30/3 - the higher the first number (the gauge) the thinner the individual cords. I stitch at 8-12 SPI, which is typical for the era we try to emulate.
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« Reply #139 on: November 12, 2015, 05:07:38 pm »

Chuck, I've been using the Barbours natural thread, but that's pretty much white. I wondered if there was something with more of an aged look, maybe with a touch of tan, the way you see in PI.
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« Reply #140 on: November 12, 2015, 07:38:24 pm »

Much of the color you see in PI is primarily due to aging. When I want a tan colored thread I dunk the whole roll in thinned down brown dye.
Another option the high quality waxed French linen thread which is offered in various colors.
http://www.fineleatherworking.com/linen-thread   not cheap but really nice pre-waxed thread.
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Cliff Fendley
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« Reply #141 on: November 12, 2015, 08:12:42 pm »

Skeeter, When waxing the thread just do it with dirty hands or gloves. Naturally aged linen thread Grin

No joke, I've actually done that when stitching pre dyed leather and don't want the thread real white looking.

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« Reply #142 on: November 12, 2015, 09:03:13 pm »

Thanks, pards.
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1961MJS
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« Reply #143 on: February 24, 2016, 03:16:35 pm »

Hi

I"m starting on a 3 knife case, I've done a few sheathes, but none this thick.  It is suggested in this thread, that I use a drill press to make the holes for sewing.  I THINK someone mentioned, not turning on the drill, but just pressing through because you want the leather pushed out of the way, not taken away.  I didn't see it though.  Is that right or not?  I'm really trying hard to get the holes straight for once...

Thanks

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« Reply #144 on: February 24, 2016, 05:02:51 pm »

Can you chuck up your awl in a drill press and punch the holes with the drive turned off? Every hole would be exactly the same angle that way.

When I worked in the saddle shop, we would sometimes punch holes with a sewing machine that had no thread in it when we wanted a nice even hand stitch through numerous layers.
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Cliff Fendley
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« Reply #145 on: February 24, 2016, 06:11:01 pm »

Sometimes a drill press wants to pick up the entire work piece if you use just and awl or don't turn it on where a stitching machine has a presser foot holding the work down. I use a finish nail and turn it on and let it just punch a starter hole. Then I can push an awl through by hand while sewing.

I actually have done the stitching machine trick but it's easy to tell if the hole was made with a regular harness awl or machine awl or needle so I figure I just as well let the machine do the rest of it.

The nail in a drill press doesnt alter the look of a hand stitch if you chase the holes with an awl while stitching. It just makes it much easier on old tired hands.
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« Reply #146 on: February 26, 2016, 03:15:17 pm »

Hi

Thanks, both of you.  I'll try both the awl and I'll get a few finish nails to try also. 

Later
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Blair
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« Reply #147 on: February 26, 2016, 04:12:30 pm »

I have not read through all of these 6 pages, so I don't know if I am covering old material.

When I build a holster, I use 8-9 oz. leather. This runs about 1/8 inch thick, so when sticking two pieces of 8-9 oz. leather together, they are about 1/4 inch thick.
I like to use a 5 or 6 threads per inch indicator to mark out my stich seam to run my awl through the leather for this weight leather.

The hand awl does very nice to create the holes all by itself.
Hole punches and/or drills remove leather from the area of the stich. An awl just  spreads the leather leaving maximum amount of leather and strength around each stich.
My best,
 Blair
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« Reply #148 on: February 26, 2016, 10:06:56 pm »

Blair, that's why I just poke a hole with a tiny finish nail and then the awl follows that hole very nicely and you are not removing any leather. It comes out the exact same as using just the awl except it saves my hands.
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« Reply #149 on: February 27, 2016, 04:57:40 am »

When faced with a particularly hard piece of leather, I stick an old broken needle or ask blade in my drill press and use it to punch my holes. I don't turn it on, I just use the downward force of the press. It will make mincemeat out of the toughest leather.
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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  CAS TOPICS  |  The Leather Shop (Moderators: Marshal Will Wingam, Ten Wolves Fiveshooter)  |  Topic: Hand Stitching Leather « previous next »
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