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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  Special Interests - Groups & Societies  |  Cosie's Corner & Feed Bag  |  The Pantry (Moderator: Delmonico)  |  Topic: Recipes (Meat dishes) 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: Recipes (Meat dishes)  (Read 24288 times)
Joyce (AnnieLee)
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« on: July 27, 2005, 02:27:29 pm »


Apple-Cherry glazed pork chops

Apple-Cherry Glazed Pork Chops
Makes 2 servings  
  

Apple-Cherry Glazed Pork Chop  
 

  Ingredients  
1/4  to 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme leaves  
1/8  teaspoon salt  
1/8  teaspoon black pepper  
2  boneless pork loin chops (3 ounces each), trimmed of fat  
 Nonstick olive oil cooking spray  
2/3  cup unsweetened apple juice  
1/2  small apple, sliced  
2  tablespoons sliced green onion  
2  tablespoons dried tart cherries  
1  teaspoon cornstarch  
1  tablespoon water  
      
 
 
 
  
1. Stir together thyme, salt and pepper. Rub on both sides of pork chops. Spray large skillet with cooking spray. Add pork chops. Cook over medium heat 3 to 5 minutes or until barely pink in center, turning once. Remove chops from skillet; keep warm.
 
2. Add apple juice, apple slices, green onion and cherries to same skillet. Simmer, uncovered, 2 to 3 minutes or until apple and onion are tender. Combine cornstarch and water. Stir into skillet. Bring to a boil; cook and stir until thickened. Spoon over pork chops.
 

I haven't tried it, but it sounds good!

AnnieLee
  
 
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« Reply #1 on: July 30, 2005, 05:30:34 pm »

I bet that got your attention, the subject of this recipe, the Green Sea Turtle is on the en-dangered species list. This could get you some serious jail time, but I bet it would be good eatin'.

Of course that might be one of the reasons they are endangered, they taste good. Recipes for Green Sea Turtle show up in almost any cook book of the time. Even then they were expensive, I have seen 30-50 cents a pound quoted for turtle steaks. Most hotel and fancy eatin' houses bought the whole turtle live and they could weigh up to 500 pounds.

This is how it is written up in my 1906 copy of the "Crosby Washburn Milling Companies "Gold Medal Flour Cookbook." This popular cookbok would later add the imaginary lady "Betty Crocker."

It is suggested by the book that one buys your turtle meat from one of these places, they often have some to spare. One would not want to buy a whole turtle for home use unless you were having a lot of guests.

Green Sea Turtle Steaks

Cut into slices about 1/2 inch thick. Rub them well with olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper 1-2 hours before cooking. Broil till well done.

It is my understanding that the steaks are cut from the large flippers and the rest of the turtle is used for soup and other recipes.

There is evidence that these turtles were packed in ice and shipped by rail to fancy places far inland in the 1880's and 1890's.

For my own protection, "Cosies don't try this at home, not only would you violate local, state and Federal laws, you would violate International Treaties.
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« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2005, 12:31:51 am »

PORK WITH APPLES AND ONIONS



This is one of those that can  feed two or twenty just as easy.
 
For every pound of pork chops or roast you need 1 med onion and 1 green apple.

Slice the onions and apples. If you are doing chops slice them thin, for a roast a bit thicker.
Season the pork with salt and pepper, sear in a little oil.
Add the onions and  some fresh thyme, sage and rosemary. Pour in  a little white wine, beer, apple juice or water .
Cover tight and bake at 300.
If you are doing chops add the apples when the pork is about half done. For a roast add them the last 30 min.
When done remove the meat and thicken the sauce with a bit of corn starch.
Served with cornbread dressing  and fresh green bean will make the pickyest  happy.


Annie this can be done on just the stove top with chops.
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Ruff Justice
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« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2005, 12:43:32 pm »

2 pounds fresh testicles   
1 cup floor
1/4 cup cornmeal
1 cup red wine
salt
black pepper
garlic powder
Louisiana Hot Sauce
cooking oil

With a very sharp knife, split the tough skin-like muscle that surrounds each "oyster". Remove the skin. Set the "oysters" into a pan with enough salt water to cover them for one hour (this takes out some of the blood). Drain. Transfer "oysters" to large pot. Add enough water to float "oysters" and a generous tablespoon of vinegar. Parboil, drain, and rinse. Let cool and slice each "oyster" into 1/4" thick ovals. Sprinkle salt and pepper on both sides of sliced "oyster" to taste.

Mix flour, cornmeal and some garlic powder to taste in a bowl. Roll each "oyster" slice into this dry mixture. Dip into milk. Dip into dry mixture. Dip into wine quickly (you may repeat the procedure if a thicker crust is desired). Place each "oyster" into hot cooking oil.

Add hot sauce to cooking oil (to taste). Cook until golden brown or tender, and remove with a slotted spoon or wire strainer. (careful the longer they cook, the tougher they will become)

Drain on paper towels and serve.
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« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2005, 12:23:33 am »

The story of this one was a day several years ago when two guys could not decide what to cook:

Take 10 pounds of chicken, we used hidequarters.  Get a large meat cleaver and chop into pieces, making loud thunkin' noises to impress the tourists who have come to watch.  Put the pieces in a fourteen inch 11 qt dutch oven, this is the deep one. Throw enough water on to cover, add some salt and blackpepper to taste.  Put it on a bed of coals and simmer.

While it is simmering sit and look at the oven.  Ask Gopher Grease "what are we going to make here?"   When he says "don't know, you decide."  When you take control of the situation, add several cans of 'maters or one #10 can.  As an after thought add a couple or more large double pinches of sweet basil.  (A common herb grown in many gardens of the time.)   

When it is almost done and the chicken is tender, Gopher Grease will realize there are a lot more folks than expected.  At this time one of the cosies should add half as much regular uncooked rice as liquid.

The folks who ate loved it.  When our dear friend Donna came up and gave us each a kiss on the cheek for such a wonderful dish, we named it "Donna's Chicken.

What makes it PC?  It uses common items avalible almost any where in the time period.
And I'll bet we wern't the first to put tomatoes in the "Chicken and Rice."



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« Reply #5 on: August 28, 2005, 08:46:53 pm »

Roast 4 lbs of chicken hind quarters, with salt and pepper.
When the meat is done, set to the side to cool, then remove from the bones.
In a 14 shallow oven the pre-cooked chicken is mixed with diced onion, carrots, potatoes and a turnip.
Add a big handful of flour, the broth from the chicken, a can of milk and water to just cover every thing.
Put this on to simmer slow till the vegetables where mostly cooked.
For the crust I use a basic biscuit dough.  Pat the crust by handfuls to about ¼ inch, laying the pieces on top.
Cook the crust with most of the heat on top till done and browned.





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« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2005, 02:37:14 pm »

This is another of I don't like that, pass me thirds dishes.  (All the time I hear I don't like kraut then they want thirds)

Amounts are not critical so we'll go basic and you make it to yer cook pot.

Take some pork, roast, steak, chops or such is fine.  The roast will just take a bit longer to cook.

Sear the pork in a heavy skillet or DU, add a bit of lard if the meat is real lean.  When it is well seared remove and brown 1 or more onions in the drippings.  Replace the meat and add about an inch of water to the pan.  Simmer for aprox. 1 hour for steaks and chops, 2 for roast.

Add some caraway seed tand black pepper to taste and enogh kraut to cover the meat, simmer 1 more hour or so till meat is tender. 

Mix 1 teaspoon brown sugar and 1/2 teaspoon flour for each 12 oz or so of kraut, mix in enogh water to make a thin paste and stir it into the kraut.  Return to simmer.

Now while doing this with the meat, boil several peeled potatoes.  Let cool and mash or rice.  (A potatoe ricer looks like a large garlic press.) Riceing is best.  Mix 1/2 and halve mashed potatoes and flour , before mixing add 1/2 teaspoon of baking powder to the flour or use self-rising flour.  Mix 1 beaten egg in for every 2 cups of mix.  If needed add abit of water and roll out by hand, dumplings 1/2-3/4 around and 3-4 inches long. 

Remove the pot from the fire and add the dumplings to the top.  Bring to a boil and cover for 15-20 minutes.  Serve with the sourdough Czech Rye bread and the kolach.  (I'll dig up a good period one)

Vita Vaas
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« Reply #7 on: September 06, 2005, 07:02:47 pm »

Ok they are scarce today, but related to doves, I just use two doves where the original recipe I looked at said 1 Passenger Pigeon.

Take the breast fillets from 6-7 doves.

Simmer with a little water, butter salt and pepper till tender.

Add a half pound or so of fresh mushrooms

Add 2 cups heavy cream and bring to a simmer.

Add to a 10 inch pie pan with yer favorite crust recipe on the bottom.

Add a top crust and make cute little birds for the vents.

Bake at 425 till the crust is a golden brown. 1/2-3/4 hour.

Serve either hot or cold.

This was a popular recipe for high class restaurants, the Passenger Pigeons where shipped in barrels in the modern refrigerator cars of the time period.  The ice was added at stops.


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« Reply #8 on: November 22, 2005, 04:06:02 pm »

Works good with any meat, beef being the second most common.

As many amounts used can vary, I like lots of meat and little broth.  What you need is maybe a pound of meat, cooked and deboned.  Add onions, garlic, celery, basis, parsley or what ever you desire for herbs.  When the meat is done you should have about a quart of stock to cook yer noodles in or even more if you want.  One can even leave the meat on the bone if desired, I often do this for large crowds using the cheap chicken hind quarters.  Increase the recipe as needed.  This amount works well in a 10 inch shallow oven or a 12 inch chicken fryer, cast iron of course. Roll Eyes

Noodle recipes vary, I make them one way, my wife does another.  She does them like a favorite Aunt, I do them like Grandma.  The best recipe is of course the one Grandma used. Grin

Glen's Noodles

2 cups flour
a pinch of salt
1 tablespoon of melted lard or salad oil (Olive oil is period correct)
4 egg yolks
2 whole eggs
a bit of water

Mix flour and salt and make a mound with a well in it. (Like mashed 'taters waitin' for gravy)  Add the oil and the eggs and yolks to this.  Mix well and add enough water to make a very stiff dough.  Knead well and cover for 1/2 hour.

Rita's Noodles

2 cups flour
a pinch of salt
2 whole eggs
a bit of milk

Mix salt and flour and make the well as before.  Add eggs and mix well, add enough milk to make a stiff dough and knead well, cover and let rest as above.

For either, take about 1/4 the dough and roll out thin on a well floured board. Make them thick, make them thin,but I cut them with a butcher knife, I make them thin, long and wide, Rita makes hers thick, narrow and short. 

Put a little flour in the bowl and toss them in as you cut, adding a bit of flour to keep from sticking.

When done. bring the meat and broth to a rapid boil and add a bit at a time and cover.  simmer 10-15 minutes or until tender. 

The extra flour will thicken the broth.  One can lay them out on a counter with out the flour if one does not want the broth thickened. Grin

One can also use a pasta machine if desired, simmilar gadgets were used in the period.

Thomas Jefferson had one, but his was smuggled in from Italy. Grin
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« Reply #9 on: November 24, 2005, 09:57:10 pm »

I found this in an 1870's cookbook, tried it and won't do one any other way, moist and a wonderful golden brown.

It is simple, get a large stock pot and boil it till it is almost done, but not quite falling apart.  Remove it, dry the skin with a towel and put it in an open top roaster.  I use a 15 inch cast iron skillet.  Pat it dry with a towel and brush the skin with melted butter.  Put a bit of broth in the bottom and turn the oven to 400 or so.  Put the skillet on the stovetop and bring the broth to a boil.  Pop it in the oven ald let it brown.  The white meat will melt in you mouth and there is plenty of broth for gravy, stuffing and for turkey and noodles the next day.
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« Reply #10 on: January 05, 2006, 12:19:11 am »

There was a discussion elsewhere and I was surprised that few folks know about this one.  I've never made it because I never seem to have all the proper ingreadients around handy.  Besides that there are several butchers in the area that make an exellant product.  Both spellings are accepted around here, it has to do with what can be a translation problem from Czech to English.  I've heard many variants on how to pronounce it also.  I figger my Czech friends come the closest although there is differeances from family to family.  It is sort of like eat-er-nitty, but I can't quite make it sound like they do. Grin

1 hog head, cleaned, scalded, but not skinned.
2 extra snouts
2-3 pork hearts
3 pork tongues
chunks of shoulder fat (3-4 about the size of your fist)
3 loaves of day old bread
6 cloves of garlic
3 tablespoons canning salt
1 large onion, chopped and browned
1 tablespoom marjoram
1 tablespoon black pepper
1 teaspoon allspice
1 teaspoon ground cloves
1 teaspoon ground ginger


Soak the meat in cold water over night.  Wash salt and simmer till tender.  Remove the meat from the head and grind all the meat.  Mash the garlic and mix all ingrediants together and stuff into casings.  Strain the stock and put in a large kettle.  Bring to a boil and cook sausages for 20-30 minutes.  Hang sausages to dry.  Fry very slowly till browned.

(Note this is important because burnt jandernice is a bit nasty Tongue)

Some variants of this use barley or oatmeal instead of the bread.
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« Reply #11 on: November 13, 2006, 04:42:37 pm »

Could be spoiled if not done right, but mince meat was a way of preserving meat.

Two from the 1906 Crosby Washburn Gold Medal Flour Cookbook.   

Mince Pie, Plain

Two coffee cups chopped beef and small piece, about four ounces of salt pork, four coffee cups sugar, one nutmegone coffee cup molasses, two lemons, rind and juice, or sour orange, four teaspoons salt, two cups cider, boiled with the molasses, four teaspoons cinnamon, four cups chopped fruit (raisins, citron, currents), one cup suet finely chopped.  Mix and scald, pack down in jars and pour a little brandy one top.  When used add six cups of chopped apples.

Mince Pie, Richer

One pound fresh beef, one pound tongue, one half pound salt pork (scalded) chopped very fine, one pound large seeded raisins, one pound Sultana raisins, one pound currants, three-quarter pound "A" sugar, three quarters pound granulated sugar carmel, one pint rich stock, one pint boiled cider, fruit juice or soft jelly, simmer till well blended, two teaspoons cinnamon, one teaspoon allspice, one teaspoon clove, one teaspoon mace, one teaspoon nutmeg, one-half pound citron shredded.  Cool and taste, and some more seasoning if desired.  Pack in glass jars, pouring two tablespoons of brandy one top of each.  When ready to use, add two annd a half cups of raw chopped apples to each cup of the mince:  partly cook and put in the pies hot, adding lemon (grated rind and juice) and rose water if liked.


Some notes, I would not store this in a cupboard like they did, the sugar and spices are to preserve it, but I would make it up just a couple days before needed and store in the ice box just to be sure.   

Sultana raisins are a small seedless raisin as are the currants used in this context.  (Currants are also a berry similar to goose berries)

One coffee cup is 12 ounces not 8.  When is says cup instead of coffee cup it is 8 ounces.

The tougue in the second recipe would need scalded and skinned first.

"A" sugar is just good quality white sugar, all we get today would be called "A" sugar back then.

This is writted as published, the commas are all as the original text.
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« Reply #12 on: December 02, 2006, 11:28:28 pm »

Sausage Gravy and Biscuits

Basic Backing Powder Biscuits

2 cups all-purpose flour
3 teaspoons Baking Powder
1 teaspoon salt

Mix well

Cut in 1/4 cup lard or 1/3 cup shortening

I just cut it in by working in with my hands till there are no clumps of the lard.  (Note the reason it takes more shortening is that lard works better and since the are almost equal in good/bad cholesterol, you are better off with lard for baking)

3/4 cup of milk

Mix in and knead just enough to make sticky dough.  Pat or roll to about 1/2 thick and cut with a biscuit cutter, empty can or just pinch off and make them by hand.  Bake in a 450-degree oven for 10-12 minutes.  Makes 18 two-inch biscuits.


Get some sausage fried up all crumbly, I prefer "Farmland brand "Bacon and Sausage" sausage, it has 25% bacon ground up in it and is made in Crete Nebraska, about 25 miles from Lincoln and also I have a brother-in-law who works there.  (If anyone remembers Brewer and Shipley and their song "Tarkio Road", Crete Nebraska is where they were headed to play a concert one time and were waylaid for some sort of a herbal problem before they got there.)

Any way get your sausage done amount can vary a lot as desired, for this lets just say do a pound.  if you have a lot of grease, pour off some excess and either brown 1/4 to 1/2 cup of flour in with it or as I do, I just keep already browned flour in the cupboard in a container.  (Make this in a 350-degree oven stirring once in a while)  By browning the flour you get away from the raw flour taste you can get.  When the flour is browned, turn off the heat, let cool for 2-3 minutes, this can help prevent lumps.  Add one quart of whole milk, turn on the heat and stir with a whip till smooth.  Let come to a slight boil, stirring once in a while and when it boils, turn off the heat, it will thicken as it cools.  This will make about a quart and a half of gravy.


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« Reply #13 on: January 29, 2007, 09:19:51 pm »

Breakfast Sausage
  
2 pounds pork roast, diced into 1/4-inch pieces (these are fairly lean)
6 oz. Salt Pork, diced into 1/4-inch pieces
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 1/2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
½ teaspoon dried sage
½ teaspoon dried thyme
½ teaspoon dried savory
1 tablespoon light brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon fresh grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper

Special equipment: meat grinder


Combine diced pork with all other ingredients and chill for 1 hour. Using the fine blade of a grinder, grind the pork. Form into 1-inch rounds, or stuff in small size casing.   Refrigerate and use within 1 week or freeze for up to 3 months. For immediate use, saute patties over medium-low heat in a non-stick pan. Saute until brown and cooked through, approximately 10 to 15 minutes.
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« Reply #14 on: March 17, 2008, 11:32:49 pm »

Meatballs (Boullettes)

2 lbs lean hamburger
2 medium onions
diced salt
pepper
2 tbsp flour
Mix hamburger, onions and flour
Season to taste with salt and pepper
Make into meatballs about 2 inches in diameter
Place in pot of boiling water for about 1 hour.



Wild Rice and Prairie Chicken (Partridge)

1 cup cooked wild rice
1/2 cup margarine
breast of one partridge
1/4 cup onion minced
1/4 cup chopped celery
1 can chopped mushrooms
season with salt, pepper and season salt.

Fry onions, celery and mushrooms in margarine until lightly browned. Add all ingredients. Cook about 10 minutes (you can add soy sauce if you wish). Stuff partridge with wild rice mixture and wrap partridge in tin foil. Roast until done.


Tourtiere (meat pie)

Pastry: 5 cups of flour, 2 teaspoons of salt, 4 teaspoons of baking powder, 1 lb of lard, 1 cup of hot water, 4 teaspoons of vinegar, 1 well-beaten egg. Measure flour, salt and baking powder into large bowl. Stir together to distribute all ingredients. Add lard. Cut into pieces with knife. With pastry cutter, cut in lard until whole mixture is crumbly. Mix hot water, vinegar and well-beaten egg together. Pour slowly over flour mixture stirring with fork to distribute. With your hands, work until it holds nicely together. Filling: 5 lbs of ground pork, 2 lbs of lean ground beef, 6 medium onions, salt and pepper to taste, and 3 garlic cloves Place all ingredients into extra large saucepan. Add water to cover about 3/4 of the meat mixture. Bring to a boil and simmer for approximately 30 minutes. Stir occasionally. Cool slightly. Line pie with pastry. Fill with meat mixture. Dampen outer edge with water. Cover with pastry (make slits in top crust). Press edges to seal. Bake in 350 F oven until golden brown. These freeze well and may be left in the freezer for 4-5 months. This recipe makes approximately 7 pies.


Pemmican
2 lbs. of lean buffalo or beef 1/4 cup dried berries (blueberries or saskatoons) 5 tablespoons of animal fat
Cut the meat into long strips and hang in the sun to dry for several days. When completely dry, pound each strip until broken into flakes then mix together the flakes and dried berries. The meat, berries and melted fat can be mixed into a bowl. When the fat has cooled the ingredients can be rolled into large balls and stored into plastic bags. Pemmican can be eaten as is, cooked like hamburger, or boiled with flour and water to make soup.


Roasted Muskrat

Remove the ribs, head and white gland (sacs) from around the back legs. Boil water and place the muskrat in the boiling water until they are cooked. Remove the muskrat and heat a frying pan with lard. Place the muskrat in the frying pan and add salt and pepper for taste.

Chicken Croquettes

One solid pint of finely chopped cooked chicken, one tablespoonful of salt, half a teaspoonful of pepper, one cupful of cream or chicken stock, one tablespoonful of flour, four eggs, one teaspoonful of onion juice, one tablespoonful of lemon juice, one pint of crumbs, three tablespoonfuls of butter.  Put the cream or stock on to boil.  Mix the flour and butter together, and stir into the boiling cream, then add the chicken and seasoning.  Boil for two minutes, and add two of the eggs, well beaten.  Take from the fire immediately and set away to cool.  When cold, shape and fry.  Many people think a teaspoonful of chopped parsley an improvement.

(What’s funny is it didn't say what to do with the other two eggs ….?)
 

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« Reply #15 on: March 17, 2008, 11:38:25 pm »

SAUSAGE GRAVY


   There is no standard recipe for this classic "soppy" and you may use any kind of loose sausage you have.  My favorite, however, is 75% ground Moose mixed with about 25% ground pork.  Then it should be highly seasoned with sage, cayenne, salt, and black pepper.

Ingredients

    - 2 pounds (more or less) seasoned sausage meat
   - 1/4 cup of flour (approximate)
   - 2 to 3 pints of sweet milk

Preparation & Cooking

    Crumble and fry the sausage over medium heat.  If sausage meat is "dry" add 2 or 3 Tbl of bacon fat or oil.  When the meat is browned, gradually add some of the flour and rub it into the hot fat until well blended.  Slowly add the milk, stirring all the while, and simmer to desired thickness.  Serve bubbling hot over broken open biscuits.

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« Reply #16 on: January 02, 2009, 12:22:14 pm »

The swamp deer around here leave a lot to be desired, gamey tasting swamp critters that they are. Nothing like those fat and tasty Yankee deer!

Anyway, to insure your venison is tender and edible without knowing the quality, I would make it into Sauer Braten as that is what I sometimes do to the deer meat from around here. Now, Sauer Braten recipes are numerous as recipes for beef stew and spaghetti sauce, but here is one I learned from a crazy German woman. It works well and is traditional to boot!

Take about 5 to 10 bay leaves and throw them in  a dish.
Add a large chopped onion,
1 teaspoon of pepper and a teaspoon of salt.

Throw the meat in there and toss it around then cover the chops with clear vinegar, or German spiced vinegar if you find some and toss it around some more.

Cover and let it set in the refrigerator for 3 days, turning the meat once every day.


Preheat oven to 350

Pull out the chops (throw away the marinade) and place them in a covered baking dish and bake 1 to 1 1/2 hours or till tender (depending on thickness of chops)

Drain the juice into a two cup measure, scraping the pan if need be and add enough cream (or skim milk if you want)
to make 2 cups. Pour it in a small pot. Add a little parsley for color if you want

Pulverize into powder 5 ginger snaps and stir them into the sauce. This is to thicken it

Stirring constantly on high heat, bring it to a boil.

Stir in more ginger snaps if it is not thick enough and return it to a boil.

Salt and pepper to taste.  Other spices may be added, but go easy!

Pour the sauce over the chops on a serving dish

Serve with egg noodles.

By the way, like spaghetti sauce and beef stew, it tastes better reheated the next day. Good Luck!

From Delmonico:
Any way you'd cook pork chops is good, but keep the heat down and do them slow.  I just brown them in butter and braise them myself, I make cream gravy out of the drippings and put it over the meat and biscuits.  My favorite meal in the whole world.

From Rowdy Fulcher:

I love to cook deer meat over a wood fire and I like to have some sassafras burning . Cook it slow and some salt and peper and it's GREAT . The key is the smoke .

From Ranch 13:

Thaw them out, get all the blood drained out.
 sprinkle with Mrs. Dash, salt and a couple dollops of Lea&Perrins Worchestire
 Dredge in floor.
 Hot skillet with a tad of oil (crisco, lard, bacon grease etc) throw them in, sear and brown both sides. turn the heat down,add just a bit of water,cover and let them simmer until done.
 Make gravy from the fixins in the skillet, serve with taters, and bisquits .

From DRcook:

For future reference, it's best to debone venison, instead of cutting through it with a meat saw. The
bone marrow in deer goes rancid on being exposed to air, and imparts some of the so-called "bad,strong
or gamey" taste to deer.

Additionally, if you scrape off all the fat, that helps also

I like to take bacon and wrap the deer meat with it and broil it, or grill it, etc. The bacon fat puts some
of the lost moisture back into the deer meat, keeps it from drying out and getting tough and adds
some flavor.

The last time I went hunting, I hauled out a couple does that must have weighed over 300 lbs. My
dogs weigh over 100, and they were at least 3 times as big as my dogs. Corn fed does are superior
in taste to a buck that is all nasty tasting from being full of testosterone.

From Pony Express:

Dave's right, de-bone it before you freeze it, and remove as much fat as possible. I don't cut mine that thick, either, just about 3/4" for mine.If it's a trnder cut, just salt pepper and fry a little bit in a little oil. Can dredge in flour, or not, I do it both ways.My wife, who is from Philippines, likes to marinate it in a bit of soy sauce-vinegar-lime juice, and then sautee some onions in the leftover mixture to serve with it. They call that "bistek" when done with beef, I guess this would be "Venstk"


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« Reply #17 on: August 08, 2010, 01:13:06 pm »

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Mongrel Historian


Always get the water for the coffee upstream from the herd.

Ab Ovo Usque ad Mala

The time has passed so quick, the years all run together now.
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« Reply #18 on: August 14, 2010, 04:52:23 pm »

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Always get the water for the coffee upstream from the herd.

Ab Ovo Usque ad Mala

The time has passed so quick, the years all run together now.
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