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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  Special Interests - Groups & Societies  |  Cosie's Corner & Feed Bag  |  The Pantry (Moderator: Delmonico)  |  Topic: Recipes (Deserts) 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: Recipes (Deserts)  (Read 24906 times)
gophergrease
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« on: July 17, 2005, 08:58:53 pm »


Basic cake

½ stick butter   
1 cup sugar (white or brown)
2 lg eggs
2 teaspoon vanilla

2 tablespoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
2-4 cups all purpose flour
1 ½ cup milk

Beat the butter and sugar together till Stir. Beat in eggs.
Stir in milk
Add 1 ½ cup flour and baking powder beat well, at least 100 strokes by hand.
Add  rest of flour ½ cup at a time, batter should be a little thicker than the box cake mixes. A little thick is better than to thing.

Makes 2 8inch rounds or 1 12 inch shallow Dutch over.
Bake at 350 for apx 30 min, till knife come out clean.


I use this for most everything , you can add chopped fruit, spices, almost anything to it and have a different cake everyday.



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« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2005, 09:19:46 am »

Green tomato pie

Ingredients:
6 to 8 medium green tomatoes
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 teaspoon grated lemon peel
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
3/4 cup granulated sugar
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1 tablespoon butter
pastry to 9-inch 2-crust pie
Preparation:
Wash the green tomatoes well; peel and slice. In a saucepan, combine tomatoes with lemon juice, peel, salt, and cinnamon. Cook tomato mixture over low heat, stirring frequently. Combine sugar and cornstarch; stir into tomato mixture. Cook mixture until clear, stirring constantly. Add butter, remove from heat, and let stand until slightly cooled. Line a 9-inch pie plate with pastry; pour in tomato mixture. Cover with top pastry, seal edges, crimp, and cut several small slits in crust to allow steam to escape. Bake at 435° for 35 to 45 minutes, or until nicely browned. Serve warm or cooled.
Quiche Recipes and Tomato Pies

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« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2005, 11:56:01 am »

1 tablespoon cornstarch
1 cup water
3 cups of fruit with juice
1 cup flour
3 tablespoons butter
1/2 cup sourdough starter
1 tablespoon sugar
1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup milk
Cinnamon

Heat oven to 400. Mix sugar and cornstarch and gradually stir in water. Bring to a boil for 1 minute stirring constantly. Fold in 1 cup of fruit. Slowly fold in the remaining fruit. Pour into a 1-1/2 quart or 8x8-inch baking dish. Dot with butter. Sprinkle with cinnamon. Measure 1 cup of flour by dip method. Stir in sugar, baking powder, and salt. Cut in butter until mixture looks like meal. Stir in milk and sourdough starter. Add a Dash of cinnamon. Pore over or drop by spoonfuls over the hot fruit. Bake for 25-30 minutes. Serve warm with fresh cream or whipped cream.

Moderators note:

Not only PC but a very common chuck wagon recipe.  May I I make on sugestion, change the 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder to 1/2 teaspoon baking soda or as it was often called salertus.  The baking powder contains acid as the sourdough.  It will rise the same but will have less of the sour taste.

Period sourdough recipes use the soda, for some reason many modern sour dough cooks forget basic chemistry.   

When the acid is already there like sour milk, mollasses, butter milk and such reduce the baking powder about 1/3 to 1/4 and use soda instead.
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« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2005, 08:46:15 pm »

Got this one from my maternal grandmother, who passed on in 1973 at the age of 83.  Aunt Lillie was my maternal grandfather's sister.  The recipe, in my grandmother's handwriting, has this comment off the the side:  "GOOD!".   And she wasn't fibbin'.  It's very simple to make, requires nothing exotic, and has always been number one on my kids' request list.


1 cup milk
2 cups sugar
1 cup lard (I deviate here and use melted butter or cooking oil Wink)
3 cups flour
4 egs
3 tsp vanilla
2 tsp baking powder
1 tsp salt

Mix until smooth, and pour into a "lubed" pan ( I usually use a cast iron, or cast aluminum w/teflon Bundt pan.  Be sure to grease the pan, or you'll be digging the cake out in pieces. Cry)

Bake at 350 degrees for one hour.  Test with a toothpick - if it comes out dry, you're good to go.  Unless it is for company, I have to have some while it is still warm with a glass of milk.  As my grandma said, "Good!"  It can be iced if you desire, but I like it plain.  Also great with strawberrys or peaches and vanilla ice cream.

Moderators note:  The original Pound Cake recipe:

A pound of sugar
A pound of flour
a pound of sour milk
a pound of butter
A couple of pinches of pearl ash (a type of high quality wood ash) or baking soda

Rose water or vannilla extract to taste (Optional)

Dates to at least the middle of the 18th century.


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Capt. Hamp Cox
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« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2005, 10:05:25 pm »

This is a good'un - I promise.

2 cups buttermilk
2 1/2 cups sugar
6 tablespoons flour
8 eggs, lightly beaten
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1/2 lb unsalted butter, melted and slightly cooled
2 nine-inch, deep dish pie shells

Combine susgar, flour, beaten eggs, vanilla, buttermilk and melted butter in a bowl.

Mix until smooth.  Bake at 425 degrees for 15 minutes, then lower to 350 degrees for 40-50 minutes until pie rises.  Pie will settle when cool.  Store in fridge or freezer.  Serve at room temperature with whipped cream.

                                                 ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

According to the info I have, this recipe was brought to the States in the 1820s by Chef Justin Bishop's Austrian great-great-great-grandmother, Elizabeth Stutz.
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Capt. Hamp Cox
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« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2005, 02:08:22 pm »

This old family recipe was handed down from my greatgrandmother (don't know where she got it), to my grandmother, to my mother, and finally to me,  As far as I can recall, I've enjoyed it every Christmas since I was old enough to eat food with nuts in it, must be goin' on 62 years now.

2 cups sugar
1/2 pound cut-up dates
1/2 cup evaporated milk
2 1/2 cups pecans (reckon any locally available nuts would work)
2 tablespoons butter

Mix all ingredients (except butter) together in heavy pot.  Bring to boil and add butter.  Cook, stirring constantly, until soft ball stage or 234 on candy thermometer or until mixture thickens.  Remove from heat.  Stir until real thick, pour onto wet cloth, roll up in cloth**.  When firm, unwrap and slice, and store in lidded container so that it doesn't dry out.


**A little difficult to explain this part.  Need to have a wet cloth (we still have some old flour sack dish towels my grandma made that we use for this) spread open on a hard surface that can handle that amount of heat ( large cutting board will work).  Pour the hot candy in a line (18-20" long) across the middle of the wet cloth.  Fold the top portion of the cloth over the hot candy, then the bottom portion up over the covered candy.  Being careful not to burn yourself, shape the cloth-wrapped "hot" candy until it resembles a small loaf (approx. 2" in diameter) of french bread (it is date LOAF, afterall). 
 

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« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2005, 08:07:45 am »


2 cups sugar
1 teaspoon soda
1 cup buttermilk
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons butter
2 1/2 cups pecan halves

In large heavy saucepan combine the sugar, soda, buttermilk and salt. 
Cook over high heat for 5 minutes (or to 210 degrees on candy thermometer) stirring and frequently scraping bottom of pan.  Add butter and pecans.  Continue cooking, stirring constantly and scraping bottom and sides of pan until candy reaches soft ball stage (234 degrees).  Remove from heat and cool slightly.  Beat until thick and creamy.  Drop from tablespoon onto buttered wax paper (this must be done quickly, as the candy will begin to harden very rapidly) and let cool.

This has been a family favorite Christmas candy for probably 45 years.  The original recipe came with Bordens Buttermilk distributed just prior to the Christmas season each year. If everything is done right, the pralines will come out firm,smooth and creamy.  If not cooked long enough, they will be more like the Mexican praline, soft, chewy, and sticky.  Either way, they are superb.  Just don't overcook Sad.
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gophergrease
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« Reply #7 on: August 07, 2005, 12:06:06 am »

Lemon Cream Tort


Starting with your basic white cake, add a little extra vanilla. Bake two round layers.

FILLING

Whip 1 cup of heavy cream. As it starts to thicken sift 1/3 cup of powdered sugar in slowly as you whip.
Set the cream in a cool place till needed.

In a double boiler melt 1 8 oz block of cream  cheese with 1 cup sugar and the finely grated rind of a lemon.
When this has melted whisk in 2 egg yolks. Continue whisking till the temp reaches 160. Remove from heat and Wisk in the juice of 1 lemon. Set aside to cool.

Note: if you cook the cream cheese before making the cake you can use the egg whites to replace 1 of the eggs. This will make a cake that is whiter.

When cooled but not cold, fold in the whipped cream.

Slice the layers of cake in half.
Spread the layers with filling, about a half inch thick or 1/3 of the filling.

Chill before serving

Sift powdered sugar on the top just before serving.
If you grate the rind from a lemon into a cup of powdered sugar a day or so ahead, then sift it will have nice fresh lemon flavor.



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« Reply #8 on: August 12, 2005, 05:59:12 pm »

This is for those of you who truly, deeply HATE fruit cake.  It’s not like any other you ever tried.  I think you may like this one.

2 CUPS RAISINS

2 CUPS DATES

 3 CUPS WATER

1 CUP SHORTNING OR BUTTER (don’t really see any difference in this case.)

2 CUPS  GRANULATED SUGAR

2 TSP CINNAMON

2 TSP CLOVES

2 TSP GROUND NUTMEG

½ TSP SALT

2 SMALL JARS FRUIT MIX (or cut up gum drops. If you use gum drops DO NOT boil them.)

MIX INGREDIENTS IN LARGE PAN.

BOIL INGREDIENTS FOR A FEW MINUTES, THEN LET COOL TO LUKEWARM.

4 CUPS FLOUR

2 TSP SODA

SIFT THESE TWO INGREDIENTS TOGETHER.

2 CUPS CHOPPED WALNUTS, PECANS, or CASHEWS

2 CUPS GUM DROPS (SEE ABOVE)

MIX ALL INGREDIENTS ABOVE TOGETHER AND STIR THOROUGHLY.

ADD 2 TSP LEMON JUICE AND STIR IT IN.

PUT IN GREASED LOAF TINS OR WHATEVER.

BAKE FOR 1 HOUR AT ABOUT 325-350 FAHRENHEIT (If you use Centigrade you have to do your own math.)

COOL. EAT. ENJOY.

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« Reply #9 on: August 12, 2005, 11:54:18 pm »

New York Cheese Cake

Crust
1cup flour
½ cup powdered sugar
¼ cup melted butter  (may need more or less)

Mix the dry
Slowly add the butter till it turns to looking like crumbs ( kind of like a slightly wet pie crust)
Hand pat into 10” spring form pan. Let the crust come up the side about ½ inch.
Pre bake at 350 about 15 min, it will look a little dry and have a lite golden brown color.
Let cool.


Filling

2 lbs block Cream cheese 
2 cups sugar
1 Tbs vanilla

4 eggs
4 egg yolks
¾ cup sour cream
¼ cup heavy whipping cream
2 Tbs flour

Let the cream cheese come to room temp
Beat cream cheese, sugar and vanilla together. ( the longer and harder the better, I the big stand mixer go on high about 10 min)
Scope sides of bowl every minute or so
Continue to mix at low speed and add eggs and yolks one at a time
Scrape sides
Add flour and scrape sides again
Turn mixer off
Add sour and whipping cream mix in by hand (over mixing at this point will make the finished cake granting)

Fill pan with crust no more the 2/3 full
Set large pan of water on the lowest rack of oven
Bake cake on middle rack for 2 - 2 ½ hours at 250.
Test for doneness by gently shaking the pan, it should move as one mass.

Let cool remove for  pan and enjoy.

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Ruff Justice
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« Reply #10 on: September 18, 2005, 04:53:26 pm »

1 cup active starter
1 cup unbleached flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon cloves
1/2 cup white sugar
1/2 cup butter or margarine
1/4 cup dry skim milk
1 cup applesauce
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon allspice
2 teaspoons baking soda
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 each large egg, well beaten

Mix together the starter, milk, flour, and applesauce, and let stand in a covered bowl in a warm place. Cream together the sugars and butter. Add the beaten egg and mix well. Add spices. You may also add a half cup of raisins or chopped nuts, or a mixture of the two. Beat by hand until well mixed and no lumps remain. Bake at 350 degrees for half to three quarters of an hour. Test for doneness with a knife when half an hour is up. Allow to cool until cold before cutting and serving.
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« Reply #11 on: October 10, 2005, 04:13:14 pm »

Dump Cobbler               

 Recipe by: Ricky E. George Fort Worth Fire Department

1 stick of butter
2 cups of sugar
1 1/2 cups of flour
2 tsp salt
2 tsp baking powder
1 1/2 cups of milk
 2 cans pie ( apple, strawberry, blueberry, cherry or peach )
Melt butter in 8" x 16" pan. Mix all ingredients, except pie filling in a bowl. Pour mix into pan with melted butter. Add pie filling spread evenly throughout mix, bake at 350 degrees for approximately1 hour.
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« Reply #12 on: October 16, 2005, 02:55:28 pm »

With Christmas only a little over a couple months away I thought you might like this one.  This was one my Grandma Carman always baked at Christmas.  Dad thinks she got the recipe from her grandma.

I did something few will do, I put this up as Grandma left it to us, but I did a little back engineering cause I know it has been updated because it calls for shortening.  My Grandmother would have understood, she loved history also.


    Orange Delight Cookies

3/4 cup shortening
1 1/2 cups brown sugar
2 eggs
1/2 cup sour milk
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 1/2 teaspoon grated orange peel
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons baking powder
3 cups flour
3/4 cup of English walnut meats finely chopped
1/4 teaspoon salt

Cream the shortening and brown sugar.  Beat the eggs, vanilla, orange peel, baking soda and sour milk creamed shortening.   Mix the flour, baking powder, salt and the nutmeats, stir into the mixture.  Make a drop cookie and bake in a 350 degree oven till done. (10 to 12 minutes)  While hot spread with the topping mixture.

    Topping
1 1/2 teaspoons grated orange peel
1/3 cup orange juice
1 cup white sugar

This will make a grainy topping.

More historically correct would be to use half lard and half butter.  My guess (educated?) it that this recipe evolved in the time just after the Civil War from a basic cookie recipe, most likely with black walnuts.  The added orange and the English walnuts adds to my theroy that it was developed for a Christmas treat when these became some what easy to obtain over in wester Iowa.  My Grandmother never made it with black walnuts even though she raised them in the orchard.

The original cookie most likely used baking soda or even pearlash, depending on the time period it was used.  The extra baking powder raises it even more, making it cake like.

If my grandmother got this from her grandmother, she may have been the originator of it.  My grandmother passed on in 1991 and was born in 1904, her grandmother should have been about the right age to have originated it, becuse the oranges would have been hard to get in the US till about the time of the Civil War.

I have never seen another recipe quite like this one, if your family has a similar one or you try it and enjoy it let me know
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« Reply #13 on: October 16, 2005, 02:59:09 pm »

A little over 2 months to go, get to bakin'.  Anise cookies have been a tradition in many parts of the world for many years.

To those who don't know, anise is a seed of the anise plant, part of the parsley family, a relative of carrot and dill.  Even though the taste is similar to licorice, it is not the same, licorice flavor is from the root of the licorice plant, this is a legume, a relative of the pea and bean.  So don't be callin' these licorice cookies or I'll have to go inta one of my frothin' rages, not good when makin' cookies, maybe ok fer meringue pie cause no one would notice.

This one has also been in our family for many years and I would say it dates to at least before the Civil War by many years cause it uses 1/4 teaspoon cream of tarter and 1/2 teaspoon bakin' soda (salertus).  One can just use 1 teaspoon bakin' powder for the same results.

     Anise Snaps

1 1/2 cups flour
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cream of tarter
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup butter
3/4 cup white sugar
1 beaten egg
1 tablespoon anise seed

Mix together dry ingrdieants, Cream butter and sugar.  Add dry mixture and anise seed.  Mix well until blended.  Chill for at least 2 hours.  Heat oven to 350. (Medium Hot)  Roll dough 1/8 inch thick and cut into desired shapes.  Bake 12-15 minutes on ungreased baking sheet.

This next ones are of German origin.

     Springerle

2 eggs
1 cup white sugar
2 1/4 cups flour
anise seed

Beat egg and sugar for 5 minutes, mix in enough flour to make a stiff workable dough.  Cover and chill for 2 hours

Roll out 1/8 inch thick, cut and sprinkle with anise seed, let dry 10 hours and bake in 325 degree (medium hot) oven on ungreased baking sheet, 1/2 inch apart for 12-15 minutes.



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« Reply #14 on: November 12, 2005, 12:53:17 am »

Dried fruit was a common item on the overland trails and in chuck wagons, canned fruit has been around since the late 1830's, but besides being more expensive that dried it also added much more weight from both the liquid and the can. 

In fact this is said to have come from the overland trail days:

Spit in my ear and the'll me lies,
but don't make me eat no more dried apple pies.

Apples, prunes and raisins were the cheapest and most common dried fruit.

Apricots in my opinion are the best dried fruit and today I decided to make a cobbler out of some, it was so good I had to have seconds.

Any one who has seen me knows I seldom use measuring devices so I sometimes have trouble writing down recipes after I experiment, but I can duplicate them in the kitchen.  You don't have to be real exact on many things so I'll write this as a 19th century cook book would with explanations.

Take 2 handfuls of dried apricots ('bout 2 cups) and put them in an enameled sauce pan. (cast iron will darken the fruit)  add a half handful of brown sugar ('bout 1/2 cup) cover with water and simmer till plumped. ('bout an hour, add water if needed)  Let cool while making the crust.

Take 2 handfuls of flour ('bout 2 cups)  and add about a heaping teaspoon of backing powder. (2 teaspoons) mix and also mix in a handful of brown sugar. ('bout a cup) Cut in a hunk of butter the size of 2 walnuts. ('bout a half stick)  Mix in enough milk to make a sticky dough.  ('bout 2/3 cup)  Mix but do not knead.  Take a heaping teaspoon of flour (yep 2 teaspoons) and mix in enough water to make a thin batter. ('bout a 1/3 cup)  Mix with the fruit and put the fruit in a deep 9X9 dish. 

Flour the rolling surface and the top of the dough lightly and roll out 1/4 to 3/8 inch thick.  The dough will be hard to pick up in one piece so just pick up pieces of it and cover the fruit.  Take a half handful of brown sugar ('bout half a cup) and a hunk of butter the size of a walnut ('bout a 1/4 stick) and mix well and sprinkle on the top. 

Bake in a hot oven (375-400) for 'bout 30-45 minutes or until the crust is browned.

Brown sugar was more common because it was cheaper.

Second Version:

Tried a different version of this today.  Prepare the fruit as before but for the crust, take:

1 12 oz can of milk (fresh will work but scald the milk and let it cool)
2 eggs (beaten)
3-4 cups of flour
1 package of yeast
a bit of salt (optional)
1/2 cup brown sugar

Dissolve the yeast, sugar and salt in the milk, add the eggs and stir.  Add enough flour to make a stiff dough and knead well.  Let rise till double, ('bout an hour)  Knead well again and take half the dough and roll it out about 1/4 to 3/8 inch thick.  Cover the fruit in a 9X9 dish.  Let rise till double and bake at 375 for 30-40 minutes or until nice and brown.  When slightly cool take 1/2 cup powder sugar and enough water (2-3 teaspoons) to make a thick past, drizzle it on top and let cool.

Since I use canned milk we have dough left over, you can cut it in half with fresh milk.  What I did was roll out the dough about 1/4 inch thick.  I then coated it with melted butter, spread brown sugar on it and sprinkled it with cinnamon.  I rolled it up, sealed it and when it rose I baked it with the cobbler, add 1/4 cup more powdered sugar to the frosting and frost it also.  Slice and eat.  Two desserts and not much more work than one.
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« Reply #15 on: January 25, 2006, 08:01:36 am »

In my cook book, it is labeled Mom's bread pudding, but I think it was my Grandma's recipe.   I loved this stuff on a cold winter's night. 

Mom’s Bread Pudding
 
8 slices raisin bread
3 cups 2 % milk
½ cup sugar
5 large eggs
1 tsp vanilla extract
1/4 tsp cinnamon
 
Mix together and put in large casserole pan.  Place pan in a larger pan of water and bake for l hour at 350 degrees, or until knife inserted comes out clean.
 
Sauce
 
2 T. margarine
3 T. all purpose flour
½ cup sugar
1 cup hot water
1 tsp vanilla extract
 
In a sauce pan, Make a roulx, then add thehot water and sugar.  Stir until mixture bubbles.  After it cools a little, add the vanilla. Stir.
 
**Mom didn't do the water bath, but I do, and instead of using 5 eggs, you can use 5 egg whites and get the same results.  Mom always just made this a few hours before we would eat it, so it was always still warm.   


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« Reply #16 on: February 09, 2006, 01:09:06 pm »

This has been in my Family for years and is a favorite of my wife's

Oatmeal Cake

1 ½ cup of boiling water
1 cup rolled oats
1 stick butter (½ cup)
1 cup brown sugar
1 cup white sugar
2 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 ½ cup of flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon salt

Add boiling water to oats and allow to soak for 20 minutes.   

Cream butter and sugars in large bowl.   Add eggs, vanilla, and cinnamon, mix until smooth. 
Sift dry ingredients together and add dry ingredients and oats to butter.   Mix batter until just blended.

Options at this point:  Leave as is; mix in 1 cup chopped nuts (floured);mix in 1 cup dried fruit (floured, my preferred is chopped dates); or my favorite, a mix of chopped walnuts and dates.   It is very flexible.

Pour batter into a 9x13 pan and bake in a preheated 350º oven for ~30 minutes or until a tester inserted in middle of cake comes out clean.   For a bundt pan, cooking time is extended by ~15 minutes.

For icing, I just mixed powdered sugar, vanilla and a little milk.


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« Reply #17 on: January 13, 2007, 09:50:35 am »

Sweet Corn Cake Recipe
 


*Note on Masa:
You can buy prepared masa dough at most Mexican and specialty food markets.
Or you can readily purchase Masa Harina (made by Quaker Oats)
which is dried corn that has been ground and treated.
It is the basic ingredient used in making tamale dough (also called masa).

**Note on steamers:
You can also improvise a steamer by placing a rack on cans in a large stockpot
 or Dutch oven with a tight-fitting lid.



1/2     cup butter, softened   
1/3     cup masa harina       
1/4     cup water     
1 1/2   cups frozen corn, thawed       
1/4     cup cornmeal   
1/3     cup sugar     
2       tablespoons heavy cream       
1/4     teaspoon salt 
1/2     teaspoon baking powder

Blend butter in a medium bowl with an electric mixer until creamy.

Add the masa flour and water to the butter and beat until well combined.

Put defrosted corn into blender or food processor and with short pulses,
 coarsley chop the corn on low speed.
You want to leave several whole pieces of corn.
 
Stir the chopped corn into the butter and masa harina mixture.
 Add cornmeal to the mixture and combine.

In another medium bowl, mix together the sugar, cream, salt, and baking powder.

When the ingredients are well blended
(NOTE: It turns out much better if you blend till it's thick & creamy),
 pour the mixture into the other bowl and stir everything together BY HAND.
 
Pour corn batter into an ungreased "8x8" baking pan.
 Cover the pan with aluminum foil.

Place this pan into a "9x13" pan filled 1/3 of the way up with hot water.

 Bake for 50-60 minutes or until the corn cake is cooked through.
When the corn cake is done, remove the small pan from the larger pan
 and let sit for at least 10 minutes.

To serve, scoop out each portion with an ice cream scoop or rounded spoon
(NOTE: 1/4 or 1/3 measuring cup works great, press "cake" in cup to form
before placing on plate) .


From Delmonico:

I'm gonna jump in here a bit and explain masa a bit more and even risk gettin' skilleted cause the Marshal'ette made one minor mistake, the corn is treated and then ground, but that is what makes it masa.  Masa is a very old item, maybe 5,000 years old.

The dried corn is soaked in lime, (Calcium hydroxide) this removes the outer hull and made it easier to grind.  this of course is just another form of hominy.  But lime process adds about 750% more calcium to it than just ground corn.  Also the process makes the Niacin in the corn be able to be absorbed into your body rather than passing on though.  This prevents a disease called Pellagra, a problem that was common among folks who eat a lot of corn bread and little else in food containing Niacin.  This was a common disease among the people in the southern US for many years.
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« Reply #18 on: August 13, 2007, 11:55:08 am »

These are out of the 1956 Betty Crocker Cookbook.  To make ther period correct just replace the shortening with a 50/50 mix of butter/lard.






Plus:

12 Tbl (1 1/2 sticks) UNsalted butter
1 cup white sugar*
1/4 cup molasses
1 egg
1 3/4 cups all purpose flour
1/2 tsp ground cloves
1/2 tsp ground ginger
1 tsp ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp baking soda

Preheat oven to 350F.  Melt butter, add sugar and molasses and mix thoroughly.
Lightly beat egg & add to mixture; blend well.
Sift flour with spices, salt and baking soda.  Add to first mixture; mix.  Batter will be wet.
Lay a sheet of foil on a cookie sheet.  Drop tablespoons of cookie batter on foil, leave about 3 inches between cookies.  These will spread during baking.  Bake until cookies start to darken, 8-10 minutes.  Remove from oven while still soft.  Let cool on foil.

Makes about 24 large flat cookies.  They stay moist in an airtight container for about 1 week.

*for richer cookies use 1/2 cup white sugar & 1/2 cup brown sugar.

Plus from Top Kick Ken:
Soft Molasses Cookies

1 cup Molasses
1 Tbsp Ginger
1 Tsp Soda
½ Cup Butter, Melted
2 Tbsp. Milk
Flour

Combine the melted butter, molasses and ginger, and mix well.  Dissolve the soda in the milk and add to the first mixture.  Sift into the liquid mixture, sufficient enough flour to make dough stiff enough to be rolled.  Chill.  Roll out to ½ inch thickness.  Cut with a cookie cutter and bake on a greased cookie sheet in a moderate oven (350 degree) for about 10 minutes.
 
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« Reply #19 on: February 17, 2009, 05:45:37 pm »

Mince Meat for Pie

Mince Pie, Plain

Two coffee cups chopped beef and small piece, about four ounces of salt pork, four coffee cups sugar, one nutmegone coffee cup molasses, two lemons, rind and juice, or sour orange, four teaspoons salt, two cups cider, boiled with the molasses, four teaspoons cinnamon, four cups chopped fruit (raisins, citron, currents), one cup suet finely chopped.  Mix and scald, pack down in jars and pour a little brandy one top.  When used add six cups of chopped apples.

Mince Pie, Richer

One pound fresh beef, one pound tongue, one half pound salt pork (scalded) chopped very fine, one pound large seeded raisins, one pound Sultana raisins, one pound currants, three-quarter pound "A" sugar, three quarters pound granulated sugar carmel, one pint rich stock, one pint boiled cider, fruit juice or soft jelly, simmer till well blended, two teaspoons cinnamon, one teaspoon allspice, one teaspoon clove, one teaspoon mace, one teaspoon nutmeg, one-half pound citron shredded.  Cool and taste, and some more seasoning if desired.  Pack in glass jars, pouring two tablespoons of brandy one top of each.  When ready to use, add two annd a half cups of raw chopped apples to each cup of the mince:  partly cook and put in the pies hot, adding lemon (grated rind and juice) and rose water if liked.


Some notes, I would not store this in a cupboard like they did, the sugar and spices are to preserve it, but I would make it up just a couple days before needed and store in the ice box just to be sure.   

Sultana raisins are a small seedless raisin as are the currants used in this context.  (Currants are also a berry similar to goose berries)

One coffee cup is 12 ounces not 8.  When is says cup instead of coffee cup it is 8 ounces.

The tougue in the second recipe would need scalded and skinned first.

"A" sugar is just good quality white sugar, all we get today would be called "A" sugar back then.

This is writted as published, the commas are all as the original text.
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« Reply #20 on: February 17, 2009, 06:01:31 pm »

Oatmeal Cake

From Mo Gorrila

This has been in my Family for years and is a favorite of my wife's

1 ½ cup of boiling water
1 cup rolled oats
1 stick butter (½ cup)
1 cup brown sugar
1 cup white sugar
2 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 ½ cup of flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon salt

Add boiling water to oats and allow to soak for 20 minutes.   

Cream butter and sugars in large bowl.   Add eggs, vanilla, and cinnamon, mix until smooth. 
Sift dry ingredients together and add dry ingredients and oats to butter.   Mix batter until just blended.

Options at this point:  Leave as is; mix in 1 cup chopped nuts (floured);mix in 1 cup dried fruit (floured, my preferred is chopped dates); or my favorite, a mix of chopped walnuts and dates.   It is very flexible.

Pour batter into a 9x13 pan and bake in a preheated 350º oven for ~30 minutes or until a tester inserted in middle of cake comes out clean.   For a bundt pan, cooking time is extended by ~15 minutes.

For icing, I just mixed powdered sugar, vanilla and a little milk.
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« Reply #21 on: February 17, 2009, 06:03:27 pm »

Bread Pudding

Another from Mogorrilla

In my cook book, it is labeled Mom's bread pudding, but I think it was my Grandma's recipe.   I loved this stuff on a cold winter's night. 

Mom’s Bread Pudding
 
8 slices raisin bread
3 cups 2 % milk
½ cup sugar
5 large eggs
1 tsp vanilla extract
1/4 tsp cinnamon
 
Mix together and put in large casserole pan.  Place pan in a larger pan of water and bake for l hour at 350 degrees, or until knife inserted comes out clean.
 
Sauce
 
2 T. margarine
3 T. all purpose flour
½ cup sugar
1 cup hot water
1 tsp vanilla extract
 
In a sauce pan, Make a roulx, then add thehot water and sugar.  Stir until mixture bubbles.  After it cools a little, add the vanilla. Stir.
 
**Mom didn't do the water bath, but I do, and instead of using 5 eggs, you can use 5 egg whites and get the same results.  Mom always just made this a few hours before we would eat it, so it was always still warm
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« Reply #22 on: February 17, 2009, 06:06:28 pm »

Pound Cake

One by me from several historic cook books.

You've all heard of and most likely ate pound cake, but do you know why it is called pound cake, look over this recipe and see if you can figure it out.

Pound Cake

1 pound of flour
1 pound of sugar
1 pound of eggs
1 pound of butter

Cream and beat the butter well adding the sugar till well mixed.  Add one egg at a time and beat each well before adding the next, when done and it looks like yellow cream. 

Sift and stir the flour in, bake in a moderate oven for 30-40 minutes

Translation:

2 cups flour
2 cups sugar
10 eggs
and of course a pound of butter.

Bake at 325-375 for 30-40 minutes.

This is a bit heavier cake than most modern recipes.  The beaten eggs are the leavening.  This recipe seems to date to around 1750, or so sources indicate.  Buy the time of the Civil War, baking powder was being added to lighten it, ad 3-4 teaspoons of it if you want a lighter one.  Some old recipes add rose water for a bit more flavor, if your local grocery store does not carry it a couple teaspoons of real vanilla extract can also be added.  This also shows up in some versions of the recipe.
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« Reply #23 on: February 17, 2009, 06:10:23 pm »

Grandma Ted's boiled fuit cake

From Forty Rod


This is for those of you who truly, deeply HATE fruit cake.  It’s not like any other you ever tried.  I think you may like this one.

2 CUPS RAISINS

2 CUPS DATES

 3 CUPS WATER

1 CUP SHORTNING OR BUTTER (don’t really see any difference in this case.)

2 CUPS  GRANULATED SUGAR

2 TSP CINNAMON

2 TSP CLOVES

2 TSP GROUND NUTMEG

½ TSP SALT

2 SMALL JARS FRUIT MIX (or cut up gum drops. If you use gum drops DO NOT boil them.)

MIX INGREDIENTS IN LARGE PAN.

BOIL INGREDIENTS FOR A FEW MINUTES, THEN LET COOL TO LUKEWARM.

4 CUPS FLOUR

2 TSP SODA

SIFT THESE TWO INGREDIENTS TOGETHER.

2 CUPS CHOPPED WALNUTS, PECANS, or CASHEWS

2 CUPS GUM DROPS (SEE ABOVE)

MIX ALL INGREDIENTS ABOVE TOGETHER AND STIR THOROUGHLY.

ADD 2 TSP LEMON JUICE AND STIR IT IN.

PUT IN GREASED LOAF TINS OR WHATEVER.

BAKE FOR 1 HOUR AT ABOUT 325-350 FAHRENHEIT (If you use Centigrade you have to do your own math.)

COOL. EAT. ENJOY.
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« Reply #24 on: February 17, 2009, 06:13:52 pm »

New York Cheese Cake

From Gopher Grease

Crust
1 cup flour
½ cup powdered sugar
¼ cup melted butter  (may need more or less)

Mix the dry
Slowly add the butter till it turns to looking like crumbs ( kind of like a slightly wet pie crust)
Hand pat into 10” spring form pan. Let the crust come up the side about ½ inch.
Pre bake at 350 about 15 min, it will look a little dry and have a little golden brown color.
Let cool.


Filling

2 lbs block Cream cheese 
2 cups sugar
1 Tbs vanilla

4 eggs
4 egg yolks
¾ cup sour cream
¼ cup heavy whipping cream
2 Tbs flour

Let the cream cheese come to room temp
Beat cream cheese, sugar and vanilla together. ( the longer and harder the better, I the big stand mixer go on high about 10 min)
Scope sides of bowl every minute or so
Continue to mix at low speed and add eggs and yolks one at a time
Scrape sides
Add flour and scrape sides again
Turn mixer off
Add sour and whipping cream mix in by hand (over mixing at this point will make the finished cake granting)

Fill pan with crust no more the 2/3 full
Set large pan of water on the lowest rack of oven
Bake cake on middle rack for 2 - 2 ½ hours at 250.
Test for doneness by gently shaking the pan, it should move as one mass.

Let cool remove form pan and enjoy.

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The time has passed so quick, the years all run together now.
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