Javascript DHTML Drop Down Menu Powered by dhtml-menu-builder.com
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
November 22, 2017, 07:03:19 pm

Login with username, password and session length

Search:     Advanced search
* Home FlashChat Help Calendar Login Register
Currently there are 0 Users in the Cas City Chat Rooms!
Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  Special Interests - Groups & Societies  |  The Cutting Edge (Moderator: St. George)  |  Topic: Just a simple Russell knife. 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 [2] Go Down Print
Author Topic: Just a simple Russell knife.  (Read 37560 times)
1961MJS
Guest
« Reply #25 on: January 16, 2014, 10:40:46 am »

Hi

The two walnut handled blades I'm working on were sanded with 600 grit paper (the lightest Home Depot had), but they still show what look like knicks.  Should I be using Walnut wood filler on Walnut.  I'm sort of new to this and have worked with Maple, Pine, and Osage Orange before I tried Walnut.

Thanks
Logged
Camano Ridge
Top Active Citizen
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 557


« Reply #26 on: January 16, 2014, 11:39:25 am »

Show us some pictures if you can. You said you sanded with 600 grit. Did you start out with a courser grit first. Normaly I start out with 80 to 100 grit for shaping, move to 150 for smotthing and getting any smaller nicks left then 200, 400, by now yoou should have smotth wood starting to show a polish. 600 should start to show a very nice polish you can go higher if you want. If I am using Highly figured wood I will go 1500 grit or higher.

Because you say there are nicks my guess is you did not start out with course enough grit to take out the nicks and imperfections. On the other hand if these are Green river style knives and not a show knife you might want to leave the nicks alone to give the knife character.
Logged
1961MJS
Guest
« Reply #27 on: January 16, 2014, 01:35:54 pm »

Show us some pictures if you can. You said you sanded with 600 grit. Did you start out with a courser grit first. Normaly I start out with 80 to 100 grit for shaping, move to 150 for smotthing and getting any smaller nicks left then 200, 400, by now yoou should have smotth wood starting to show a polish. 600 should start to show a very nice polish you can go higher if you want. If I am using Highly figured wood I will go 1500 grit or higher.

Because you say there are nicks my guess is you did not start out with course enough grit to take out the nicks and imperfections. On the other hand if these are Green river style knives and not a show knife you might want to leave the nicks alone to give the knife character.


Hi

I started out with 80 grit on a belt sander to shape, and went down from there.  The wood feels VERY smooth.  Can I get 1500 grit sand paper from Jantz?  I hadn't looked.  Home Depot / Lowe's / Walmart are kind of sparse even on 600 grit sandpaper. 

I'll take a picture when I get home.  I experimented with painting a fairly thick layer of Tung Oil Finish on the top and letting it dry, but it didn't work that well.  If I can do it tonight I will, otherwise pictures will be next week.

The knives are for the Scout Patrol Boxes, and one for me so they'll eventually have lots of character.

Thanks
Logged
1961MJS
Guest
« Reply #28 on: January 21, 2014, 11:43:15 am »

Hi

I DID work out one problem.  I'm using the last bit of a pint of Tung Oil Finish and it's getting thick.  I'll put a couple of teaspoons of paint thinner in it tonight.  I figured this out by using a little of a new can and it's MUCH thinner.

Later
Logged
Bruce W Sims
Top Active Citizen
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 294


« Reply #29 on: December 21, 2014, 02:30:10 pm »

Hi, Folks:

I'm not here to rain on anyone's parade but I recently purchased a very nice "sticking knife" and am
looking to detail it a bit. That said I'm curious about the following.
a.) Since there is no guard on my double-edged knife I am particularly concerned about having a good grip so.
     1.) Why are you folks polishing these handles like they were Bowling Alleys?
      2.) I think a bound leather grip would be best but I can't find any info on how such is done. My knife has two slabs held in place by two brass rivets.
b.) I will hand-stitch a nice sheath for this but most of the patterns I am finding are for a single-edge knife or are
intended to be worn around the neck on a thong. I'd like to find a decent belt-sheath pattern for what is
essentially a spear-point knife.  Thoughts?

I don't need to age the blade or anything. I would just like it to fit-in a bit better with the rest of my 1870-s personna.

Best Wishes,

Bruce
Logged
Blair
NCOWS
Top Active Citizen
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 2231



« Reply #30 on: December 21, 2014, 03:23:05 pm »

Bruce,

Got photos you can post of what your talking about?
This may help folks address your questions.
My best,
 Blair
Logged

A Time for Prayer.
"In times of war and not before,
God and the soldier we adore.
But in times of peace and all things right,
God is forgotten and the soldier slighted"
by Rudyard Kipling.
Blair Taylor
Life-C 21
St. George
Deputy Marshal
Top Active Citizen
*
Online Online

Posts: 4510


NCOWS , GAF, B.O.L.D., Order of St. George, SOCOM,


« Reply #31 on: December 21, 2014, 09:07:58 pm »

Make your own pattern by using a piece of cardboard, folding it, and placing the blade where you want it, then mark off enough room for the lacing/stitching holes and belt loop.

Add decorations and fringe as desired.

And if you don't want a smooth handle and can't figure out something simple like wrapping wetted leather around it and securing it by pulling it through a loop until tight and letting it dry hard, then get a couple of high-topped brass tacks and put them in place to give you a grip - three per side should do it.

This isn't rocket science - any Boy Scout can show you how, or you can look at your public library under 'Indian Crafts' to see numerous examples of simple leatherwork.

Scouts Out!

Logged

"It Wasn't Cowboys and Ponies - It Was Horses and Men.
It Wasn't Schoolboys and Ladies - It Was Cowtowns and Sin..."
Camano Ridge
Top Active Citizen
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 557


« Reply #32 on: December 21, 2014, 10:04:35 pm »

I was going to suggest wrapping it in wet raw hide and using brass tacks . It would still be nice to see a picture to give you some more ideas espescialy for the sheath. Go to Chuck Burrows site http://www.wrtcleather.com/ and spend an hour or so looking at his knives and gallerys. Many of his might be a little over the top, however they can be simlified and will possibly give you some ideas.

Logged
Bruce W Sims
Top Active Citizen
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 294


« Reply #33 on: January 01, 2015, 07:57:54 pm »

[/URL][/img]

I'm posting a link to PHOTOBUCKET so you can get an idea of what I am talking about.
The knife is a double-edged spear-point with a simple wooden handle. I saw a very nice, simple
drop-loop sheath on

http://www.westernleatherholster.com/western-leather-holsters/
(See: KS-3; KS-6)

and I feel myself moving that way as there would be no problem with wearing it regardless of the belt. Of course the problem is that this little dandy is razor-sharp on both edges so I imagine a blade-catcher in my future.

Hope this helps.

Best Wishes,

Bruce
Logged
1961MJS
Guest
« Reply #34 on: February 19, 2015, 10:48:30 pm »

Hi, Folks:
...
I    1.) Why are you folks polishing these handles like they were Bowling Alleys?
...
Best Wishes,

Bruce

Hi Bruce,

I'll just comment on the one part above.  There are a few reasons:

1.  I put a lot of linseed and stung oil finish on my kitchen knives like the Russell Green River blades to make the handle somewhat water resistant.
2.  I also do it because it is prettier.
3.  I also guess I'm following the crowd, most knives pictures show finished wood.   Roll Eyes

Later
Logged
Bruce W Sims
Top Active Citizen
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 294


« Reply #35 on: February 21, 2015, 11:19:57 am »

Thanks, Mike:

After you do your treatment is there anything in particular you do to make sure you
have a good grip? Thoughts? I'm thinking of binding my handle with either a leather or
cord wrap....


Best Wishes,

Bruce
Logged
1961MJS
Guest
« Reply #36 on: February 22, 2015, 12:33:22 am »

Thanks, Mike:

After you do your treatment is there anything in particular you do to make sure you
have a good grip? Thoughts? I'm thinking of binding my handle with either a leather or
cord wrap....


Best Wishes,

Bruce

Hi Bruce

Not really, I was told on the Bullseye-L forum that even wood coated with Tung oil gave a good grip and so far that's been right.  Of course my 1911's grips are checkered, but they still grip when wet.  I've been using several of my knives and I'm confortable with the grip even when it's wet.

Just my $0.02
Logged
1961MJS
Guest
« Reply #37 on: July 06, 2015, 11:34:40 pm »

Hi

These two are a 7 inch Russel Green River Butcher blade and a 4 inch Ripper blade.  Both handles are curly maple treated with Aquis Fortis (weak nitric acid).  In order to get the darker color, you heat the wood.  I'm concerned that I've melted at least some of the epoxy in heating the handles.  Home Depot doesn't carry anything in the glue realm that seems to be heat resistant.

Any ideas?



* 20150705_122438_resized2.jpg (32.66 KB, 448x336 - viewed 194 times.)

* 20150705_122500_resized2.jpg (31.24 KB, 448x336 - viewed 194 times.)
Logged
Sir Charles deMouton-Black
THE ANCIENT SUBSTANCE ENDURES - ALL LESSER PROPELLANTS SHALL FIZZLE
NCOWS
Top Active Citizen
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 5813



« Reply #38 on: July 07, 2015, 10:01:48 am »

I saw a reference on "Ebonizer" (or Ebenezer??) in a PopMech article within the last month or so.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Steel-Wool-and-Vinegar-Wood-AgingEbonizingWeathe/

Sounds like "vinegaroon" used as a traditional leather dye? As a leather dye, I can vouch for it, but I have not tried it on wood. It sounds like it will work, after some trials on scrap
Logged

NCOWS #1154, SCORRS, STORM, BROW, 1860 Henry, Dirty Rat 502, CHINOOK COUNTRY
THE SUBLYME & HOLY ORDER OF THE SOOT (SHOTS)
Those who are no longer ignorant of History may relive it,
without the Blood, Sweat, and Tears.
With apologies to George Santayana & W. S. Churchill

"As Mark Twain once put it, “History doesn’t repeat itself, but it does rhyme.”
Camano Ridge
Top Active Citizen
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 557


« Reply #39 on: July 07, 2015, 02:40:04 pm »

Vinegaroon can be used on wood here is a thread from blade forum. Chuck burrows gives his recommendations. There are some examples of wood treated with Roon. http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/showthread.php/823443-Vinegaroon-on-wood
Logged
Slickshot
Top Active Citizen
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 175



« Reply #40 on: July 09, 2015, 11:51:25 pm »

Adirondak Jack,

Sir; might I ask how much it would cost me to have you make one of these knives you had pictures of "Just a Simple Knife"?

I truly am interested.

Thank you

SlickShot
Logged
Pages: 1 [2] Go Up Print 
Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  Special Interests - Groups & Societies  |  The Cutting Edge (Moderator: St. George)  |  Topic: Just a simple Russell knife. « previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.066 seconds with 22 queries.