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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  GENERAL TOPICS  |  Books & Movies (Moderator: Marshal Halloway)  |  Topic: Photographic goofs in westerns 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: Photographic goofs in westerns  (Read 24833 times)
Dances With Coyotes
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« Reply #25 on: January 10, 2011, 09:37:23 pm »

I've seen the original True Grit I don't know how many times but someone pointed out that Roosters eyepatch switches eyes in the final shootout scene in the meadow. I'd never noticed that before.
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« Reply #26 on: January 25, 2011, 07:54:34 pm »

Don't know if someone already posted on this .....

In 'Dances With Wolves', Kostner is waving around his Henry, dropping great shaggies while the mag follower is down at the bottom of the tube - empty! First thing I noticed.
As a 44-40 Uberti Henry shooter, I have reservations about shooting puny pistol loads at a bison. I have baby sat a friend's buffalo ranch on a few occasions. They got to know me and were relaxed with me. One time I walked into their midst when the calves were their odd orange colour and they were in a dust wallow, rubbing off their winter coats.
I was surrounded and my Henry slung on my shoulder seemed awfully small. The bulls remembered me and didn't regard me as a threat, but the greater danger was from the cows protecting their calves. They eyed me up pretty closely and I was a little nervous for a bit.
Another time, I was baby sitting them over Xmas/New Year and they took off on a 'walk-about' as they are wont to do. I kept tabs on them (to record the damage they did) and they split  into two groups. I lost one group in the fresh falling snow and was about to quit when I checked a likely spot. Sure enough, they were bedded down, covered over and stood up one by one, shaking the snow off.
I was surrounded again. I backed off and threw down some hay from my truck and had to walk through them to get in. They were too busy to pay me any attention. Sorry - got carried away with the memory .....
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Coal Creek Griff
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« Reply #27 on: February 03, 2011, 06:48:31 pm »

I had to break out my copy of "True Grit" to check out the eye-patch switch.  There is a brief shot that appears to be "mirror-imaged".  The eye patch, guns and clothes are all switched. I guess they didn't think anyone would notice--and they were pretty much right.
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« Reply #28 on: February 03, 2011, 07:01:11 pm »

This site is great for not only finding out the guns they used it also points out a number of problems with the choice of guns. http://www.imfdb.org/index.php/Main_Page There is a lot of historical mistakes in The Good, The Bad and the Ugly besides just wrong guns used not created at the time the movie was supposed to be happening.
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Joe
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« Reply #29 on: March 29, 2011, 05:37:10 pm »

The 92 Winchester was made long after "Statecoach" was set. 

I remember an old Audie Murphy western.  He's given a Henry rifle.  He's told he'll enjoy the gun once he gets used to the heavy recoil.

Of course all of the old Civil War movies that use Trapdoor Springfields as muskets.  Then there are the ones with flintlock like hammers welded to trapdoors.

All of the Hollywood created costums in "Gettysburg".  Lee's beard isn't right either.  The reinactors, while too well fed, wore the best uniforms in that movie.

 
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« Reply #30 on: March 29, 2011, 06:07:15 pm »

I watched "Santa Fe Trail" last week (1940, with Errol Flynn, Olivia de Haveland and Ronald Reagan).  this is set in the time period leading up to the Civil War.  Of course the "history" is all mixed up, but I thought the guns were interesting.  At the beginning of the movie, it looked like they all had muzzle-loaders and cap and ball revolvers.  I was kind of impressed.  As time went on, I started seeing more and more trapdoor Springfields.  Eventually, the guns all morphed into 1873 Colt revolvers and (mostly) trapdoors.  Sometimes it seemed as if they started a battle scene with an 1860 Colt Army and ended with an 1873 Peacemaker!  It is amazing how fast technology was developing at that time.

CC Griff
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« Reply #31 on: March 29, 2011, 07:19:05 pm »

The 92 Winchester was made long after "Statecoach" was set. 

I remember an old Audie Murphy western.  He's given a Henry rifle.  He's told he'll enjoy the gun once he gets used to the heavy recoil.

Of course all of the old Civil War movies that use Trapdoor Springfields as muskets.  Then there are the ones with flintlock like hammers welded to trapdoors.

All of the Hollywood created costums in "Gettysburg".  Lee's beard isn't right either.  The reinactors, while too well fed, wore the best uniforms in that movie.

 

It's Reenactors ....and everyone know the camera adds 25 lbs  Grin
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Johnny McCrae
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« Reply #32 on: March 30, 2011, 04:56:15 am »

In "The Searchers" John Wayne carries an 1873 SAA and an 1892 Winchester. The film appears to have taken take place just a few years after the end of the Civil War.
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« Reply #33 on: April 24, 2011, 04:47:47 am »

I was watching the Westerns Channel around a year ago with my youngest. I can not remember if it was a Gene Autry or the Cisco Kid, but there was a horse chase tat showed a closeup of the riders drawing and firing. We noticed that the riders passed the same wooden picnic table no less than twice in every close up scene.
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« Reply #34 on: April 26, 2011, 05:55:53 pm »

In "The Searchers" John Wayne carries an 1873 SAA and an 1892 Winchester. The film appears to have taken take place just a few years after the Civil War.

For me the most glaring Wayne film in terms of anchronisms is The Comancharo's

Wayne states he is a Texas Ranger in the service of Republic of Texas ... "which existed from 1836 to 1846."
The film while set in 1843 .... characters all use  Winchester 1892 lever action rifles and 1873 Colt Peacemaker pistols.
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The Elderly Kid
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« Reply #35 on: April 27, 2011, 10:44:09 am »

It's been pretty rare for Hollywood filmmakers to pay much attention to the proper dates for firearms. The important thing has always been: will they shoot the 4-in-1 blanks used throughout the film industry? If they would, and they looked vaguely 19th century, they got used.
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« Reply #36 on: April 27, 2011, 01:03:36 pm »

The 5-in-1 is designed to function in .38-40 and .44-40 rifles and .38-40, .44-40 and .45 revolvers.
Head stamped 5 in 1...I lost a lot of them in my Building fire.   Sad

They had about 3 doz. Springfield Trapdoor Rifles rented from Western Costume LA.
these had a protuberance of a mock flint hammer....on "13 days to Glory" Pretty lame pieces  Roll Eyes
I've had seen the like in Disney's  "Swiss Family Robinson" 
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Shotgun Franklin
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« Reply #37 on: April 27, 2011, 02:46:40 pm »

In the John Wayne 'Alamo' there's a Mexican Infantryman wearing a wrist watch.

There's a great old movie, 'The Light That Failed' set in England and North Africa.
The whole British Army is armed with Trapdoors.

I vey many of the old Oaters the 'Indians' all speak Spanish I don't care
where they happen to be.
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« Reply #38 on: April 27, 2011, 04:10:27 pm »

I just caught one in the Eastwood movie "For a Few Dollars More". I've seen this movie at least 15 times over the years but the first time I notice Indio smoking a filter cigarette. The way he holds it hard to see but brown filters on white paper cigarettes didn't exist till the 1900's. Filters where new when I was a kid and even them few brown filter ones.
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Joe
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« Reply #39 on: April 27, 2011, 07:39:06 pm »

I got the impression Indio was smoking dope.
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joec
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« Reply #40 on: April 27, 2011, 08:00:20 pm »

I got the impression Indio was smoking dope.

It looked like a Marlboro to me.  Cheesy
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Joe
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« Reply #41 on: April 28, 2011, 10:14:44 am »

In the John Wayne 'Alamo' there's a Mexican Infantryman wearing a wrist watch.

There's a great old movie, 'The Light That Failed' set in England and North Africa.
The whole British Army is armed with Trapdoors.

I vey many of the old Oaters the 'Indians' all speak Spanish I don't care
where they happen to be.

There are a number of goofs in this one
In one scene of a Mexican charge ..you can see Production Trailers and in another a pickup truck w/ dust billowing behind.

I remember when The Alamo came out I when to see it first run at the Roosevelt Theater on Miami Beach
I bought the Show book and the cased Bowie
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Shotgun Franklin
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« Reply #42 on: April 28, 2011, 10:36:53 am »

I was told that not all the final copies of JW's 'Alamo' were exactly alike? I assume that they would be but was told that some didn't quite match up on all the scenes.
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« Reply #43 on: April 29, 2011, 02:45:49 pm »

Saw another minor one yesterday, I believe it was on Maverick. There was a character named Shotgun Sparks. His weapon of choice was a doubled-barreled, pistol-gripped shotgun with about a 18-20 inch barrel which he carried in a pistol holster not unlike Steve McQueen in Wanted, Dead or Alive. In one scene, after using the shotgun, he jams it in the holster and takes off running for his horse. As they show him running, there is no shotgun in the holster. He then jumps on the horse and in the next scene, he is on the horse with the shotgun back in the holster. Guess somebody realized that jumping on a horse with shotgun hanging down might cause you to start singing soprano.
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« Reply #44 on: April 29, 2011, 02:56:25 pm »

I'm actually watching one right now called the Long Riders about the James and Younger brothers. All the pants have both suspenders and belts with loops. I might add though most are carrying vintage single and double barreled shot guns with a few Henry repeating rifles Frank Younger is carrying a Marlin 1894 model.
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« Reply #45 on: May 02, 2011, 10:39:54 pm »

Durango Flinthart,

If yer still followin' this thread, I b'lieve I can explain Little Joe's horse's spots moving around.

I was doing some work at Mike Landon's house back in the Seventies. (Dated his kids' nanny, briefly.) He was very friendly and accessible. His poolhouse was the "Bonanza Room", full of mementos from the series. He told us that he had had two horses during the series, sequentially. It seems the first one died suddenly, and was replaced by the second. The first one died because some very sicko low-life scum broke into the barn where the Bonanza horses were kept and cut off and stole the horse's p....  Yeah, that!! Left the horse to bleed out and die...

He said they never had a clue who dunnit.

Non-linear story/filming schedules would have the spots moving around, I guess.
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Durango Flinthart
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« Reply #46 on: May 03, 2011, 05:12:59 pm »

Hard Mouth,

Thanks for the info, I just figured they had a remuda of horses and the continuity guy wasn't paying attention. I hope that karma caught up with the S.O.B. who would do that to an animal just for perverse pleasure.

Watch your top knot,
Durango 
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Drayton Calhoun
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« Reply #47 on: June 04, 2011, 09:15:50 pm »

Once Upon a Time in the West. They even pointed it out in the script. Henry Fonda is talking to his informant and points out that he's wearing suspenders and a belt and asks the guy "How can I trust a man that can't even trust his own pants?"
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« Reply #48 on: June 04, 2011, 11:51:46 pm »

Once Upon a Time in the West. They even pointed it out in the script. Henry Fonda is talking to his informant and points out that he's wearing suspenders and a belt and asks the guy "How can I trust a man that can't even trust his own pants?"

Eli Wallach did the same thing in The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly. In an oblique way he was making fun of the way Sergio Leone was dressed.
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« Reply #49 on: June 05, 2011, 07:09:59 am »

Eli Wallach did the same thing in The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly. In an oblique way he was making fun of the way Sergio Leone was dressed.
How is the belt AND suspenders a goof ? Some people dress that way ?
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