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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  Special Interests - Groups & Societies  |  The Winchester Model 1876 (Moderator: Grizzly Adams)  |  Topic: Vintage Hunting and the 1876 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: Vintage Hunting and the 1876  (Read 103180 times)
Rowdy Fulcher
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« on: December 08, 2009, 08:36:30 pm »


Howdy Pards
Vintage Hunting and the 76 Winchester . They are the perfect way to spend a day . At a time when every magazine is selling all the new fangeled gadgets to hunt with . Have you read many articles on using BPC and dressing the part of a 1880 Hunter .
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Dirty Brass
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« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2009, 01:50:39 pm »

I suspect our DNR wardens would not look kindly on dressing the part around here. Blaze orange is pretty much required for everything but bird hunting as far as I know, here in Wi. Too bad - I'd enjoy it a lot!
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Grizzly Adams
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« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2009, 04:16:03 pm »

Hi, Rowdy.

I agree, there is no better way to hunt than the traditional way with traditional arms like the 1876. Smiley Smiley

I mentioned this thread to my bride, and she said something about any hunt that I go on is a vintage hunt! Grin

 Huh
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Rowdy Fulcher
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« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2009, 06:38:13 pm »

Howdy Pards
Well Deer season is over for rifle season , so it's time to try a little coyote hunting . This will be interesting as they are difficult critters to hunt .
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Grizzly Adams
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« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2009, 06:56:27 pm »

The only coyotes I ever shot were bandits hanging around the place.  Some are pretty bold, and come in very close trying to lure my dogs away.

I assume your planning on calling them into range for the 76?
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Will Ketchum
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« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2009, 07:13:53 pm »

Our late antlerless season was snowed out for me.  It started on Thursday and ran through tomorrow but Wednesday we received about 17" of snow and then it dropped to 20 below so there was no way I would be able to get up my driveway at my hunting cabin which is nearly a mile mostly uphill.  Oh well there is next year. Sad

Will Ketchum
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« Reply #6 on: December 13, 2009, 09:14:51 am »

Our late antlerless season was snowed out for me.  It started on Thursday and ran through tomorrow but Wednesday we received about 17" of snow and then it dropped to 20 below so there was no way I would be able to get up my driveway at my hunting cabin which is nearly a mile mostly uphill.  Oh well there is next year. Sad

Will Ketchum

Sorry to hear that Will. Some friends here in northern WI. got dumped on too - nearly 17" of the white stuff - but I don't think the temps got quite that cold for them. It can make a hunt difficult at best....

Rowdy, what do you hunt the coyotes with? I've never gotten any in close enough to even attempt a 45/60 or 45/75 shot at them up here. Usually resort to a .223, .243, or .204 for the Wiley Coyote  Smiley
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Rowdy Fulcher
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« Reply #7 on: December 20, 2009, 03:30:00 pm »

Dirty Brass
I have hunted Coyotes with muzzle loaders , lever action rifles and a Trap Door carbine . These are the weapon's I love . Most people would use a bolt gun in a bunch of different calibers . I enjoy calling a coyote in and using the ole Vintage guns . I plan on a coyote hunt over the holidays , and yes I will use my 1876 in 45-60 . I also enjoy using my Trap Door it's a real sweetheart to pack all day while walking . May have to hunt me up a 1876 Carbine for that reason .

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to everyone .
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Rowdy Fulcher
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« Reply #8 on: January 17, 2010, 01:58:00 pm »

Howdy Pards
Has anyone been Hunting ? Has anyone tried Coyote hunting with a 1876 ? Calling a coyote can be a fun filled day of hunting .
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shieldsmt
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« Reply #9 on: January 19, 2010, 10:15:29 pm »

Haven't been out for a while, coyotes are thick around this part of Montana now.  Been using a 17HMR.  It may be light, but it kills them, have taken several out to 120 yds.  I'd not hesitate to use my '73.  44-40 w/ 3Fg B.P.  I only shoot black in that gun anymore.  Fine on antelope and deer, certainly would be on coyotes.  Maybe you inspired me to try it.  The '76 seems like overkill, but if thats what you've got, use it.
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Joe Lansing
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« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2010, 01:52:27 am »

    Shieldsmt, overkill is when you can't find enough left to cook.

                                                          J.L.

                                               
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« Reply #11 on: January 20, 2010, 10:40:58 am »

Cook?  Shocked  I don't think I've ever seen a recipe for coyote stew, but then I'm sure someone has tried it, or knows of one. Heck - I had Possum once, so.........

I expect one could hunt them with a .375 H&H if they wanted to. I'd consider using a TD carbine - I put about 20 rounds through mine last weekend and enjoyed it immensely. But they would have to be real close for me to hit them with it  Grin
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Rowdy Fulcher
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« Reply #12 on: January 24, 2010, 06:47:21 pm »

Dirty Brass
How could you get past the smell to cook a coyote . They are stinky critters to say the least . But they have  nice fur on them in the Winter months .
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Grizzly Adams
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« Reply #13 on: January 25, 2010, 12:31:24 am »

Coyote, the other dark meat! Cheesy
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« Reply #14 on: January 25, 2010, 04:27:53 pm »

Grizzly, that's gross.
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larryo_1
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« Reply #15 on: January 26, 2010, 09:36:53 am »

Well  Fellers, The old time Indians did.  Mountain Lion, Beaver, Porky pine and Marmot aint too bad either.  I have ate them and especially liked the lion roasts.  Porky aint too bad either if you cook it on a rotissery slow like.  So don't say that coyote is yucky cause if you are hungry enough you can gobble near most anything like that. Wink
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Howdy, Pardner! Sacramento, Ca here ....


« Reply #16 on: January 26, 2010, 10:50:45 am »

I had to smile when International Orange was mentioned.  I was stationed on the water in Portsouth NH in the 'seventies; and during that time:

A ranger was hiding behind a bush watching two drunk hunters. He leaned back on his haunches and stepped on a twig. The hunter twirled around and shot the ranger through the bush, opening up his thigh. Writhing in pain, he heard the hunter say to his friend, "You cover him and I'll finish him off ....'

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In Maine, a store owner known for cutting up game for hunters was approached by two hunters ... they wanted to know how much to butcher their animal. How much does it weigh? the shopkeeper asked.

'Oh has to be about 1300 pounds' ... (they had shot a moose) ...

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Dairy Farmers in New Hampshire and Maine regularly spray painted "C -- O -- W" on their livestock during hunting season ...

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Not saying that I am anti hunting ... just that in some states, there is a very valid reason for that International Orange hunting vest ... LOL

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My moniker is my great grandfather's name. He served with the 2nd Florida Mounted Regiment in the Civil War. Afterward, he came home, packed his wife into a wagon, and was one of the first NorteAmericanos on the Frio River southwest of San Antonio ..... Kinda where present day Dilley is ...

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« Reply #17 on: January 26, 2010, 11:40:24 am »

larryo 1 mentioned porcupine as being good to eat.  I've not eaten any, but I have heard too, that this is quite good.  I've read many times about the fact that mountain men and frontiersman would never kill a porcupine just for fun.  They knew that if they were stranded in the mountains without a rifle and needed food, a porcupine could easily be killed with a stick or rock.
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larryo_1
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« Reply #18 on: January 26, 2010, 12:54:12 pm »

Buck:
You are absolutely correct.  Porkies are very easy to kill.  When I was with the Forest Service years ago, we had a fellow who liked to try different kinds of wild meat.  His porkies were cooked on a roterserie slow-like so that all that fat would drip off.  That was darn good meat and not gamey as one would think.  I got an hunch that was one of the ways that the mountain men ate theirs as like over a camp-fire which would like-wise cause that fat to drip off. Smiley
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Rowdy Fulcher
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« Reply #19 on: January 26, 2010, 07:00:08 pm »

Howdy Pards
Don't know about Porky Pine , We have had Beaver and it's good barbecue .And we have a season coming up in Feb where we can shoot them . I will leave my 76 at  home that is over kill .
    How many Beaver Hunters are out there .      Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin
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Joe Lansing
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« Reply #20 on: January 26, 2010, 07:57:29 pm »

    Porcupine liver sauteed in butter is out of this world. It puts calf liver to shame.

                                                               J.L.
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WaddWatsonEllis
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Howdy, Pardner! Sacramento, Ca here ....


« Reply #21 on: January 27, 2010, 12:45:29 am »

When I was in 'Rescue Training 1969-70 we were on our final field trip ... I was being caried in a litter with a blindfold on to give me an idea what it would be like to be totally dependent on my medical team. All of a sudden, our instructor, and old mountain man born 200 years too late, called, "Academic situation; get that armadillo!"

I was uncermonially dropped, litter and all, as the entire team (four people)ran after this poor little armadillo. When they caught it, it curled up into a ball and they used medical tape to force him to stay that way. Then they put it between my legs and we continued on ....

About 5 minutes later, the litter got very wet where the armadillo was ... it had peed on me, itself, and the litter!

But the end of that story was that we gutted it that night and threw it in the coals, using the bony plates as a roasting pot.

Now that armadillo must have been terrified and making adrenaline for hours. I just remember it tasting like very oily very tough chicken, and marking it down as one of those things I would use as survival food and not before ...

But like a porcupine, it is easy to catch and easy to cook. I think the next time I would parboil it in the shell with some rocks for several hours ... then throw away the armadillo and eat the rocks ....


* armadillo.jpg (3.81 KB, 130x86 - viewed 2120 times.)
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My moniker is my great grandfather's name. He served with the 2nd Florida Mounted Regiment in the Civil War. Afterward, he came home, packed his wife into a wagon, and was one of the first NorteAmericanos on the Frio River southwest of San Antonio ..... Kinda where present day Dilley is ...

"Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyway." John Wayne
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Rowdy Fulcher
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« Reply #22 on: January 30, 2010, 05:13:32 pm »

Howdy Pards
I have been sitting around the fire today eating Deer jerky , the Deer was taken with my 76 and using black powder ammo . Now if I take a coyote I will not make any jerky out of them they are NASTY little critters .
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Dirty Brass
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« Reply #23 on: January 30, 2010, 06:57:02 pm »

Dog-gone it Rowdy. I didn't isolate that little doe I got with the '76 or I could have done the same thing today. I did polish off a half dozen sticks of pepperoni venison sauage sticks, if that counts, but no fire and not taken with a vintaqe rifle. One of my distant neighbors made it from his venison. Oh well - it was still good.  Smiley

Double Ditto's on the coyote jerky! (I'm still searchin' for any kind of recipe that uses coyote - not too hard tho!)
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larryo_1
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« Reply #24 on: January 31, 2010, 09:09:38 am »

Dirty Brass:
A suggestion!  Go to any Book Store and see if they have a book entitled "The Road Kill Cook Book".  You might find what yer huntin for there.  Or go find an old Indian and see if they will tell you how their ancestors did it.  According to some of my old books, they ate one hell of alot of dog stew so that might be what you are hunting for. Wink
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