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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  Special Interests - Groups & Societies  |  Frontier Iron (Moderator: St. George)  |  Topic: S&W Schofield Modern 2000 model vs. the Imports 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: S&W Schofield Modern 2000 model vs. the Imports  (Read 25931 times)
Virginia Gentleman
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« Reply #25 on: October 05, 2010, 11:41:50 am »

My Taylor's & Co. Uberti built Schofield Wells Fargo 5" barrel has done very well too compared to the Navy Arms gun I have.  I don't see any huge differences in quality at all.
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RickB
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« Reply #26 on: October 16, 2010, 10:04:29 pm »

I have 2 schofield models of Italian decent. One is a Navy Arms Uberti model and it is a beautiful gun. The other is an Army San Marcos (sp?) wells fargo model and it is a great gun too. The Uberti is tight on fit and finish and has the full length barrel. The ASM of course has the 5 inch barrel and it too is solid as a rock. I've put a few thousand rounds through the ASM and it still is tight and reliable. So I don't know what someone ment by it being a piece of crap. Mine was a latter release before they went out of business. I would put them both up against any S&W Schofield in a shoot off. I think they are solid and well made guns.

I was lucky on cost too. The ASM only cost me about $500 new and the Navy Arms one cost me $750 used.

 Cool
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« Reply #27 on: October 17, 2010, 04:04:05 pm »

You're on!  That is, if we ever find ourselves at the same match.  I've had both the Uberti and the S&W and, while the Uberti is a good gun, there's really no comparison.  I still have the S&W, as well as a Uberti Russian, and the Ubertis both feel kind of clunky, compared with the Smith.  Also, the Smith is much better made.

One other thing about the S&W 2000, it's worth dressing up.  The usual asking price these days is $2k; I got mine for $1.3k, and I'm putting another $1.5k to $2k into it for grips, engraving and gold inlay.  That's not something I'd do for a mass-produced Italian of any make, and I can't see a Uberti as an heirloom.
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RickB
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« Reply #28 on: October 17, 2010, 04:47:52 pm »

Works for me.  Grin

If memory serves me correctly, S&W had either ASM or Uberti make the gun for them that S&W put their name on. I'm not 100% sure on that, but I do recall reading that a few years back. It might be worth checking into just to be sure.

I love my schofields either way. And though the ASM has gotten a bad rap, I'll stick by it. Mine might be a lucky one in that it is solid and has had no problems.
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« Reply #29 on: October 17, 2010, 10:41:51 pm »

As stated above - Smith & Wesson reverse-engineered a Schofield that belongs to Roy Jinks.

It was built entirely in-house, at the S&W plant.

There are zero Italian parts involved.

Vaya,

Scouts Out!

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« Reply #30 on: October 17, 2010, 11:50:40 pm »

I am in Southern California, Los Angeles area. I have a Uberti Schofield and would like another. I am offering a Stainless Old Model Vaquero plus $400.oo cash for one.
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FriscoCounty
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« Reply #31 on: October 19, 2010, 10:27:22 am »

Another point in S&W developing the Schofield cartridge is the larger rim diameter.  At the time of its introduction, 45 Colt cases were balloon heads.  This produced a rim with all rounded corners (see a 22 LR case).  S&W was trying to prevent the dropping of extracted brass between the star and the cylinder, an irritating and potetially deadly thing to the soldier in a fight.

The small rounded rim of the Colt was also the reason no-one chambered rifles in that caliber.  The modern made solid head cartridge case, with sharper corners, particularly at the base of the rim, will extract from a rifle, and will extract more reliably in the Schofield.  The 45 S&W case is still a bit better with its larger rim.

By 1887 the Colt .45 round was no longer a benet cup copper round.  It was a produced as a copper Berdan or Boxer primed brass cartidge with an extractor groove.  It did not provide any advantage over .44 WCF.  Winchester had no incentive to produce a rifle in a Colt caliber.
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RickB
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« Reply #32 on: October 20, 2010, 08:57:54 pm »

As stated above - Smith & Wesson reverse-engineered a Schofield that belongs to Roy Jinks.

It was built entirely in-house, at the S&W plant.

There are zero Italian parts involved.

The reason I brought it up is a gun dealer friend of mine told me that the old ASM version of the schofiled was originally built to fill an order with S&W to reproduce their schofiled. It was built to be the same size as the original (from what he told me) and was modified to take the .45 colt round.

I guess I have a little bit of a hard time believing S&W would spend all the money to tool up and produce a limited edition gun and then not keep producting htem if they have the machines to do so. A bit difficult to understand whey the would do that.
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« Reply #33 on: October 20, 2010, 10:45:35 pm »

Simple - price...

Italian clones started flooding the market as Smith & Wesson introduced their Schofield and folks just wouldn't pay for them.

I know a few of the guys on the design team that worked the Schofield project - Italian sub-contracting wasn't even a thought, since the idea was a 'real' Schofield - built by the originators.

S&W tried lowering the overall price by eliminating the Oak display box and accessories - and packaging the weapons in decorative cardboard boxes - but the price wasn't low enough - and by that time, folks were looking at the weapon as a collector's piece - something that'll never happen with the Italian stuff.

With a 'very' limited clientele, and dwindling sales - they shut down their production line - though all CAD drawings could be used if there was a real need to produce more.

Vaya,

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RickB
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« Reply #34 on: October 21, 2010, 12:31:34 am »

Thanks for the info. Always nice to find out the history of the guns available.
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« Reply #35 on: November 12, 2010, 02:03:19 pm »

Enough of my BP pards have told me of their fits with the new repro No. 3's and Schofields that I won't buy them.

I did have a pair of 44 Russian No. 3's a few years back and they were beautiful guns that I loved shooting - but I was still shooting smokeless back then.

Maybe when I make O-6 and the kiddos get scholarships to college - I can find some original No. 3's that were well cared for and fire them with the one true powder.  I have seen shooter quality N0. 3's go for much less than the slighty used S&W 2000 schofields - and they will work with BP!

PR
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« Reply #36 on: November 25, 2010, 09:35:53 pm »

As a side note, S&W used a Mountain gun cylinder which is larger in diameter than the original. Also, as many know they eliminated the gas collar as well. The ASM was THE most authentic as it was exactly the size as an original but they lengthened the cylinder for the .45 Colt thereby eliminating the gas collar as well.
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RickB
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« Reply #37 on: November 26, 2010, 04:50:27 pm »

As a side note, S&W used a Mountain gun cylinder which is larger in diameter than the original. Also, as many know they eliminated the gas collar as well. The ASM was THE most authentic as it was exactly the size as an original but they lengthened the cylinder for the .45 Colt thereby eliminating the gas collar as well.

Thanks. That confirms what I heard about the ASM version. Maybe I got lucky with mine. It is solid and has never had a problem. The only complaint I have on it is the latch to release the barrel to allow reloading is still so stiff it pretty much requires both hands to open it. My Navy Arms model can be opened with one hand. I think the stiff one on the ASM was a fix to the initial problems with guns that popped open when fired. It sure worked in my guns case.
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« Reply #38 on: February 13, 2011, 01:11:29 am »

S&W shot themselves in the foot with the high cost of the product and not chambering it to .45 Colt which really limited its appeal compared with the Italian made guns.  I have shot a modern S&W since making this post and I could tell it was a bit lighter than the Italian guns, but it had a gritty trigger and action compared to the clones I own.  I don't see the justification for buying the modern S&W and the added cost.  Folks want $1800-2200 for them now! Tongue
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Virginia Gentleman
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« Reply #39 on: February 20, 2017, 01:40:05 am »

The cost is now a bit lower for used pieces.
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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  Special Interests - Groups & Societies  |  Frontier Iron (Moderator: St. George)  |  Topic: S&W Schofield Modern 2000 model vs. the Imports « previous next »
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