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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  Special Interests - Groups & Societies  |  The Winchester Model 1876 (Moderator: Grizzly Adams)  |  Topic: Let's Start a List: Chaparral and Uberti Production Problems 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Poll
Question: Few replica rifles 'Out of the Box' do not have any problems with the rifle.  What problems have you had with your rifle, if any?
Cartridge Lip Missing on Bolt Base - 8 (5%)
Firing Pin Hole Not Cut Correctly - 6 (3.7%)
Carrier Block Droops Below Receiver - 8 (5%)
Excess Head Space - 11 (6.8%)
Spent Case Does Not Eject from Receiver - 5 (3.1%)
Magazine Ring Doesn't Fit Flush into Dovetail Cut - 7 (4.3%)
Magazine Plug Lip Doesn't Fit Flush into Barrel Cut - 9 (5.6%)
I had to Send the Rifle Back for Replacement - 14 (8.7%)
Other Problem(s) - 36 (22.4%)
My Rifle is Slick as a Whistle - 57 (35.4%)
Total Voters: 113

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Author Topic: Let's Start a List: Chaparral and Uberti Production Problems  (Read 111500 times)
Grizzly Adams
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« Reply #125 on: May 13, 2010, 08:02:22 pm »

I just received my Chaparral Winchester 1866 yellow boy in .357 mag, 24.25" bbl from Marstar. The fit and finish is excellent, the indentations on the primers are deep and centered.  I was shooting .357 cases with 158 gr LRN....worked everytime.  .38 spl must exceed 1.49" OAL.  The action was a little stiff at first however, it has slicked out after about 20 rds.  Great gun right out of the box.

Thanks for the post on your Chappie 1866.  Does the rifle have a steel receiver with brass plating, or is it brass like the Uberti?  Got a pic? Grin

GA
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« Reply #126 on: July 28, 2010, 12:17:22 pm »

Main spring too weak, had it replaced and now works fine!
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« Reply #127 on: July 29, 2010, 12:16:33 am »

Main spring too weak, had it replaced and now works fine!

Uberti or Chappie? Smiley
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« Reply #128 on: July 29, 2010, 07:57:59 pm »

I have a Chaparral in 45/75. I took it completely apart when I got it. It was very clean inside, and while not a good as my original it was really very nice. It shoots as well or better than the original, and after using emery cloth and buffing the links and bolt it is very slick. I hate the rear site. The front site was loose so I re soldered it and it is fine now. I purchased the tang rear site put it on and took it off. I will replace the rear site, and use the tang site on something else or sell it. I used the recommendations by OKDEE. Good fit just not for me. I use H4831 powder 46-50 grains and 350 grain bullet. I read about the guy who wondered what size of swaging die for 50-95. I don't size. Just mold and shoot. The rifle swages better than I do.  My lead is a little hard, but groups about 4-5 inches at 100 yards. I use Lee tumble lube, alox. Works good. I wish the wood was better and the rear site was better, but my original has a Marbles rear buckhorn site and it worked for GrandPa.
I like my Chaparrel. With better wood it would be a great rifle. Please remember that when you read about things that are wrong, people who love the rifle rarely write letters, people who have problems usually write several.
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« Reply #129 on: August 06, 2011, 01:31:56 pm »

I have had four Uberti lever action Rifles and one pump action Lightning by ASM. Both my 1866s the 1873 and my Henry (All from Uberti)were smooth and function well out of the box. The AMS Colt Lightning in 38Spl worked good if I didn't pump it fast. I was faster than the action it seemed and it stove piped the rounds. I sold it to a fellow who had some work done and it worked fine for him he said but he sold it also. I want a Chaparral 1876 in 45-60 but I have been scared off of it by all the problems I read about but the price is tempting at under $700.00 now.
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« Reply #130 on: August 06, 2011, 04:43:08 pm »

  I want a Chaparral 1876 in 45-60 but I have been scared off of it by all the problems I read about but the price is tempting at under $700.00 now.

The bitterness of a bargain remains longer than the sweetness. Wink  Be advised that there are NO parts on this side of the pond for the Chappie.

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« Reply #131 on: August 06, 2011, 05:08:04 pm »

Grizzly
I think Marstar out of Canada is importing them now Huh Do you have any information on this ?
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« Reply #132 on: August 06, 2011, 07:26:30 pm »

Grizzly
I think Marstar out of Canada is importing them now Huh Do you have any http://www.marstar.ca/gf-Chaparral/index.shtm on this ?

Did a search and came up with this:  http://www.marstar.ca/gf-Chaparral/index.shtm

It appears that Chaparral is making a number is arms, Including an blued, iron frame 1866 which "is a faithful replica of the early production 1866 which featured an iron receiver and as a result was blued...." Shocked

If I had a Chappie, I think I would give these folks a call and see it they are stocking parts.  That would be good news for lots of folks!  Grin
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« Reply #133 on: November 06, 2011, 08:43:36 pm »

I'm in late on this, but it's relevant none the less. My Uberti has a dead soft uppper trigger which wore rapidly and failed causing the hammer to fall on cocking, always an exciting situation.  I have had this gun for probably 3 years and only had a couple sesions with it.....as it broke down it got put away  for a while. I bought a new upper trigger from VTI and of coarse lost it somewhere in our move last year. I plan on casenit'ing the existing too soft upper trigger and hope it works.
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Will Penny
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« Reply #134 on: April 27, 2012, 09:31:34 pm »

I'm in late on this, but it's relevant none the less. My Uberti has a dead soft uppper trigger which wore rapidly and failed causing the hammer to fall on cocking, always an exciting situation.  I have had this gun for probably 3 years and only had a couple sesions with it.....as it broke down it got put away  for a while. I bought a new upper trigger from VTI and of coarse lost it somewhere in our move last year. I plan on casenit'ing the existing too soft upper trigger and hope it works.

it worked Grin
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Thomas (Tom) Horn aka James Hicks
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« Reply #135 on: June 14, 2012, 12:24:41 am »

I have both the Uberti Centennial 1876 in 45-60 and a Chaparral 1876 also in 45-60. Both of these rifles are in the 28" barrel configuration. As they come ROB there is no comparison... the Uberti is light years ahead of the Chaparral as far as looks and craftmanship. But there is a LARGE price difference also, you get what you pay for. As far as the shooting... BOTH are the same, the Chaparral shoots just as good as the Uberti. When you disassemble these two rifles and look at the way they are made... then you see the BIG DIFFERENCE, kinda like drinking... some like scotch, some like Jack. Laugh The company that made the Chaparral it looks like they took shortcuts, whereas Uberti did not. I tried to see if parts were interchangable Uberti to Chaparral. The trigger parts seem to interchange but the other parts i.e., brass elevator, firing pin extension, bolt, hammer, lever, elevator follower arm would not interchange. The Uberti brass elevator will fit in the opening but will not work due to the way Uberti designed it vs the way Chaparral designed theirs. The Elevator Spring and the Lever Spring will work, at least it does in mine. My Chaparral looks as good as my Uberti NOW... but that is AFTER I refinished the wood stocks and forearm stock. ROB the Chaparral when levered sounded like an army tank running and it was HARD to lever and the trigger pull was way over 9 lbs. After much work on the action (a lot of sanding to weaken the springs, and sanding the cam on the lever, trigger spring had to remove a lot of metal to get the trigger pull down to a 2 lb pull) that solved the problem. Works great now. I did not have to do that to the Uberti, it was slick ROB. My opine: You get what you pay for. Do not expect the Chaparral's to look like the Uberti's when buying... there is about a $1000 dollar difference, depending on where you buy it. But looks is only skin deep. Kinda like lookin at a Rossi '92 vs a Uberti '73.
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« Reply #136 on: July 31, 2012, 08:06:45 pm »

I have a 28 in. 45-60 Uberti, after now about 200 rounds, I have no complaints. It seems to have gotten smoother after shooting, love it enough that I got it a little brother. A 1873 sporting in 45 colt, 24 1/4 in. barrel. I have tang sights on the way for both, Im not a competitor, nor do I play one on T.V. Just developed a new found appreciation, I was into the long range and ultra long range shooting gang for a long time.
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PJ Hardtack
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« Reply #137 on: September 04, 2013, 12:53:25 pm »

MarStar has an inventory of parts in Canada.

The bitterness of a bargain remains longer than the sweetness. Wink  Be advised that there are NO parts on this side of the pond for the Chappie.
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« Reply #138 on: January 16, 2015, 05:14:24 am »

Greetings folks, Smiley

I hope it is not to late to join into this very informative thread.

This week i bought a unfired Chaparral 1876 28inch in 45-60, from a German in Germany.

Barrel markings are: "Chaparral Charter 2000 Shelton C.T.  IT DE 10"  Serial no. W7606XX

After reading this thread i am in total panic, but after inspecting my 1876 i am much more relaxed Roll Eyes

1. Muzzle crown is absolutely sharp edged instaead of a phase, but should be ok
2. Front sight nicely made and correct alligned, however i changed to a Buffalo Beach Combination front side, which fits in the slot perfectly
3. Tube latch end does not fit in the barrel slot and the tube ring are loose in the barrel like many other Chappies
4. I use shortened starline 45-70 brass and i can not locate a head space issue so far.
5. Rear sight is realy junk and i have this air gap in the slot as well. I replaced the junk with a Lyman 16B folding leaf rear sight which fits perfectly.
6. The lever action is going acceptable for me, maybe i will polish the internal parts a bit.
7. I installed a Lyman no 2 tang peep sight for winchester and Browning replicas 1886 with no problems. It is true i have to find a new place for my thumb  Undecided
8. Wood appearance and fitting is not bad at all

9. Saturday is show time with 320grain lead bullet, BP swiss 2 and a thin card wad between, minimal compressed  on 100 yards Cheesy Cheesy

Some first pictures:

If you like i keep you informed about my progress.

Mine has a pretty low serial no. concerning your experience it should be crap at all but it isnt...

regards from Bavaria

Tom


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Gabriel Law
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« Reply #139 on: January 17, 2015, 01:18:13 pm »

I bought my Uberti Centennial 1976 in December 2013, and since then have fired over 500 rounds through it.  My rifle functions flawlessly though I took Tom Horn's advice and replaced the lever safety spring, lightened the trigger spring, and the mainspring.
But it does have an issue - and a serious one at that...the barrel leads up destroying accuracy after only a few shots.  I have gone through a regime of polishing the bore, casting bullets soft, medium, and hard, lubed with several mixtures settling on SPG, shooting a variety of powders including Swiss 1 1/2 Fg.  When I clean the rifle, I feel a 'loose' spot about 8" up from the breech, and I suspect I'm getting gas cutting which leaves lead in my bore.
My current attempt to remedy this is to fire lap the bore using Wheeler Engineering compounds: 220, 320, and 600 griit.  At the velocities this rifle likes (around 1200 fps), I don't think I should be getting any lead, yet here we are.
I'll let you know how I make out.  Weather's mild enough to shoot the rifle tomorrow...
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matt45
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« Reply #140 on: January 18, 2015, 12:01:29 pm »

Did you ever try the gas checks?
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Gabriel Law
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« Reply #141 on: January 18, 2015, 12:05:46 pm »

No one makes a gas check bullet in 300 grain.  So no, I haven't used them.  Are you suggesting that I gas check my BACo459300 bullets?
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Gabriel Law
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« Reply #142 on: January 18, 2015, 05:52:13 pm »

Belay that last post...found a nice RCBS double cavity 300 gr. gas-check bullet mound through Precision Reloading, and will order it ASAP.  Now, regarding gas checks themselves...Lyman or Hornady?  One better than the other.?  Hornady is cheaper by a lot.

I've cleaned my rifle after fire lapping this morning.  After 90 rounds without cleaning during the process, I had a very small amount of leading.  But the bore is noticeably improved.  Prior, the bottoms of the grooves were quite rough with longitudinal machining marks, and those are all but gone.  Too, the edges of the rifling are far more polished than before.  I can still feel the 'loose' spot but it feels less than before.

Now to load some more real ammo and try it again...

Oh, by the way, I re-crowned the muzzle while I was at it, using a ball bearing SS to a 1/4" rod in an electric drill turned slowly, and the lapping compounds.
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« Reply #143 on: January 18, 2015, 06:24:01 pm »

Hello Gabriel! I have been following your post about your difficulties with your barrel leading and most interesting the loose spot ! May I ask ,how many of each grit compound did you fire ? Was it more  of the 220- 320 or the 600? Or equal amount of each I have no experience  in fire lapping ,but have in the past had very good luck lapping rough bore rifles with valve grinding compound and a poured lead bore plug. Each time that a rifle bore was lapped in such a manner ,I saw great improvement in accuracy and the ease of clean-up .I hope you the best and look forward to see if the fire lapping has helped .,,,,,DT
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« Reply #144 on: January 18, 2015, 07:07:49 pm »

Hey Gabe,
     I've never noticed a difference between the Hornady or the Lyman gas checks. 
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Gabriel Law
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« Reply #145 on: January 18, 2015, 07:46:05 pm »

Thanks for your thoughts guys.  This is a process that is going to require the expenditure of some time, and a lot of patience.  I will test the results of today's exercise with some of my best loads, and report on the outcome.

I know very well the benefits of actual lead lapping a rifle barrel, having been around muzzle loading rifles for a lifetime.  I am not above disassembling my rifle and lapping the bore to remove the 'loose spot'.  It actually feels like three little bumps when I run a tight patch down the bore.

I'm also going to run some jacketed bullets through the rifle, and some gas-checked bullets too, just to see what potential the rifle has.  I have arguably the best sights one can acquire, and a stock that fits me wonderfully, so I have high hopes.  My goal is to achieve 2 MOA accuracy with reliability.

I actually enjoyed the fire lapping shooting this morning...I needed something to shoot at just to make it interesting, so I picked a steel hanger (about the size of a robin) at 200 meteres, and blazed away at it offhand.  I made an interesting mess in the snow all around the 'bird'.  The weather here has been crazy warm...right at the freezing point, so I've been able to continue this exercise throughout the winter, when we usually have -35 C at this time of year, and obviously, no shooting.  I understand the rest of the continent is not so fortunate.

And to answer the question (better late than not at all), I fired 30 rounds of each grit, letting the barrel cool often, but never cleaning throughout the process.  I was amazed at how little lead fouling I had.
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« Reply #146 on: January 19, 2015, 03:44:57 pm »

A couple of people have had the barrels on their Uberti 1876s rupture.  I think the rupture occurred about 8" from the receiver, but not positive about the location.  Both shooter said there were no obstructions and the loads were mild.  If you have the means to bore scope the barrel it may show a weak spot in the barrel.  Just a thought.

Silver Rings
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Gabriel Law
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« Reply #147 on: January 19, 2015, 06:26:32 pm »

The thought has occurred to me as well.  I don't have access to a bore scope.  But I checked out the serial numbers of the disaster rifles and compared it to mine, and mine is a much newer rifle with a far greater serial number.  You'd think that for $1800 CDN, you'd get a rifle with a decent barrel, wouldn't you?

I have tested the rifle again, after fire lapping the bore yesterday morning.  I loaded 50 rounds with 14 gr. Trail Boss and BACo's 459300 bullet:  15 rounds in pure lead, left over from the lapping exercise, and 35 bullets in B 12.1 alloy, about wheel weight hardness.  After the first est with pure lead, I ran a dry patch through, and got no lead, then a patch wet with lead removing solution, and got the finest little dust of lead, but nothing like I had got previously.  I then fired 15 more rounds at a new target, using the harder lead, and got a pretty decent target at 50 meters...less than 2" and in the black.  So I continued to fire the rifle with these loads at 100 meters until I had shot off the entire 50 rounds without cleaning thoroughly.  when I got home, I cleaned the bore, and again came up with some very fine lead dust, but nothing to write home about.  The fire lapping certainly did polish the bore, and made a profound difference in both the accuracy, and the ease of cleaning.

More testing to follow...
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« Reply #148 on: November 20, 2015, 10:33:29 am »

Ive finally gotten around to making brass and shooting my .45-70 1876 RCMP Chappy src. My problem is the headspace is too tight. Using a feeler gauge i get .059, the head thickness on a 45-60 is supposed to be .063. Ive trimmed the bases of a few RP cases down to .058 which eliminates the headstamp with the primer still below flush. I would need to go to .056 to have no resistance when i close the lever. Other than that and some stiffness when cycling the rifle is fine. The wood to metal fit is good and the finish is ok. I think i will enjoy shooting it when it breaks in.
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« Reply #149 on: November 20, 2015, 04:35:52 pm »

The thought has occurred to me as well.  I don't have access to a bore scope.  But I checked out the serial numbers of the disaster rifles and compared it to mine, and mine is a much newer rifle with a far greater serial number.  You'd think that for $1800 CDN, you'd get a rifle with a decent barrel, wouldn't you?

I have tested the rifle again, after fire lapping the bore yesterday morning.  I loaded 50 rounds with 14 gr. Trail Boss and BACo's 459300 bullet:  15 rounds in pure lead, left over from the lapping exercise, and 35 bullets in B 12.1 alloy, about wheel weight hardness.  After the first est with pure lead, I ran a dry patch through, and got no lead, then a patch wet with lead removing solution, and got the finest little dust of lead, but nothing like I had got previously.  I then fired 15 more rounds at a new target, using the harder lead, and got a pretty decent target at 50 meters...less than 2" and in the black.  So I continued to fire the rifle with these loads at 100 meters until I had shot off the entire 50 rounds without cleaning thoroughly.  when I got home, I cleaned the bore, and again came up with some very fine lead dust, but nothing to write home about.  The fire lapping certainly did polish the bore, and made a profound difference in both the accuracy, and the ease of cleaning.

More testing to follow...
Normally firelapping is done with 200, 400, 800 and finally 1200 grit commercial grade lapping compound. Four rounds are fired with each grit starting with the most coarse and cleaning after every shot. To combat gas cutting use some wads cut from 100% cork gasket material, slightly oversized. NECO Industies is where I got my firelapping kit from. You can do many guns with one kit.  wM1
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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  Special Interests - Groups & Societies  |  The Winchester Model 1876 (Moderator: Grizzly Adams)  |  Topic: Let's Start a List: Chaparral and Uberti Production Problems « previous next »
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