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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  GENERAL TOPICS  |  Saddlebag Tales  |  ST Comments  |  Topic: "The Last Patrol" Backstage! 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: "The Last Patrol" Backstage!  (Read 14995 times)
1stSgt Fritz King
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« Reply #25 on: January 01, 2010, 08:44:51 pm »

Happy New Year!
I'm sorry I've been gone for so long.  I will write the battle as journal entries, and add them into the thread.  I hope 2010 will be a very good year!
R/S
Fritz
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1stSgt Fritz King
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« Reply #26 on: January 06, 2010, 02:15:38 pm »

Before I forget, I'd like to thank Mr. Neil C. Mangum for his excellent book, "Battle of the Rosebud: Prelude to the Little Bighorn."  As the former First Sergeant of I Company, 2nd U.S. Cavalry, American Civil War Society, I was searching for a comprehensive history of the battle that my unit had taken part in.  This is it!  Though I have fictionalized some of the names and actions of the characters (mine included!), I've tried to remain true to the actions of my unit as they occured that fateful day in 1876.  The events of the Rosebud have been overshadowed by the disaster at the Little Bighorn several days later.  But this battle is unique in that it was the first in which the Indians fought as cohesive units, rather than individual fighters.  I hope you're enjoying the ride!
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Scarlet Angel
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« Reply #27 on: January 10, 2010, 01:11:57 pm »

If y'all didn't see the parade the float Ella helped on was spectacular!!!!
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"The Scarlet Angel, heaven and hell all rolled into one.... Id hate to be the one on the hell side. ~Patches McDuff

"Courage is being scared to death - but saddling up anyway." John Wayne

"Dance like nobody's watching; love like you've never been hurt. Sing like nobody's listening; live like it's heaven on earth."  Mark Twain

Elegant Ella
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« Reply #28 on: January 10, 2010, 03:58:02 pm »

Because I announced riding on the Odd Fellows Float to many people, including the Yahoo! group for my neighborhood, I got a call from an editor on the Palo Alto Weekly for more information.
The resulting story is here:
http://www.paloaltoonline.com/news/show_story.php?id=15046
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Elegant Ella
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« Reply #29 on: January 10, 2010, 10:54:05 pm »

Nice article...Thanks for sharing!

That must be some experience decorating a float...and riding on it too!
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"The Scarlet Angel, heaven and hell all rolled into one.... Id hate to be the one on the hell side. ~Patches McDuff

"Courage is being scared to death - but saddling up anyway." John Wayne

"Dance like nobody's watching; love like you've never been hurt. Sing like nobody's listening; live like it's heaven on earth."  Mark Twain

Elegant Ella
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« Reply #30 on: January 13, 2010, 01:03:21 am »

I think the one of the biggest differences between then and now is the speed of communications.
We pick up the telephone or send an e-mail, and reach someone in minutes. 

Back then, the fastest communication was the telegraph. It was pretty close to instantaneous from telegraph station to telegraph station, but there would be some time getting the message from the telegraph station to the recipient. The cost of a telegram discouraged long messages and long conversations. 

General Crook's camp on Goose Creek was less than 100 miles away as the crow flies from the battle of the Little Big Horn, but the only way for General Crook to communicate with General Custer or General Gibbon would have been to send a dispatch rider south back to Fort Fetterman, where a telegram could be sent to Fort Lincoln (from whence a dispatch rider could head west to find Custer) or Fort Ellis (for a dispatch rider to ride East to find Gibbon).

Nowadays, a letter only takes a few days to get to its destination anywhere in the United States, flying over vast distances. Back then, it took longer. A letter from Fort Fetterman, which did not have a post office, had to travel on the supply wagon back to Fort Laramie, which had the closest post office. From the post office, the letter would probably go to Cheyenne and the railroad system. For the story, I guessed that a letter from Fort Fetterman would spend a full week in transit to Boston. 

People traveled slower as well. Most track had a top safe speed under 50 miles per hour, and trains paused for water every 50 miles or so.
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Elegant Ella
1stSgt Fritz King
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« Reply #31 on: January 18, 2010, 01:14:52 pm »

Dear Readers,

Like the song says, "what a long, strange trip it's been."

Thanks for your patience while this old Jar-Head told his tale.  I started this story in conjunction with my own retirement from the Corps.  It hasn't been easy for me, as I'm sure it won't be easy for Fritz.  There were a few dark days in there.  I'd like to thank Scarlet and Ella for keeping the thread rolling while I fought some demons.  I'd also like to thank my muse, Cori, for kicking me in the ass hard enough to get me writing on this story again.  I tried to keep the story as historically accurate as posssible, as far as the actions of I Company, Second Cavalry was concerned.  I used the names and characters of my reenactment unit in California in lieu of the actual participants.  Thanks to them as well for fostering my interest in this subject.  I hope I did honor to those brave men and women in "Dirty Shirt Blue" who fought and died on the Plains, as well as the Native American Warriors who fought for home and hearth.    

I look forward to the next time the "Petticoat Posse" saddles up.  It's a pleasure riding with such companions.
R/S
Fritz  

 
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El Peludo
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« Reply #32 on: February 14, 2010, 01:01:17 pm »

So, have y'all wound this one down to it's final post?  It's been a long one, but good.  Thanks for the entertainment.
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El Peludo (The Hairy Man)
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Lucky Irish Tom
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« Reply #33 on: February 14, 2010, 08:26:41 pm »

It was an excellent story, the Petticoat Posse did a fine job!
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Slo' Poke Pete
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« Reply #34 on: May 18, 2010, 08:51:20 am »

Great story, read it twice.  Ready for another.

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Cas City Forum Hall & CAS-L  |  GENERAL TOPICS  |  Saddlebag Tales  |  ST Comments  |  Topic: "The Last Patrol" Backstage! « previous next »
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